34th Street East Theatre

241 East 34th Street,
New York, NY 10016

Unfavorite 3 people favorited this theater

Showing 26 - 46 of 46 comments

KenRoe
KenRoe on May 2, 2006 at 11:26 am

Just looked up the 34th Street Theatre and found its listed in Film Daily Yearbook’s from 1926, 1927, 1930, 1941 and 1943. Same address and seating capacity as posted above by William. Strange it is currently not listed on Cinema Treasures.

William
William on May 2, 2006 at 11:12 am

Well the FDY; 1944 edition lists the 34th Street Theatre, 162 E. 34th Street with 600 seats.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on May 2, 2006 at 10:41 am

I think that 34th Street Theatre was near Macys and I have some signs of it being opening 1949-1950. It tracks where Wendy’s is now.

241 East 34th Street is the 1963 Walter Reade house which was Head Office when I worked for Cineplex Odeon.

KenRoe
KenRoe on May 2, 2006 at 9:54 am

Al; The Film Daily Yearbook;1950 edition lists a 34th Street Theatre, 162 E. 34th Street, New York, NY with 720 seats.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on April 23, 2006 at 8:49 am

Does anyone have any information on a “34th Street Theatre” that appears in the NY Times 1948-1949? I am not sure where on 34th Street it was.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on March 3, 2006 at 4:48 am

I neglected to mention that the brand-new theatre shared the American premiere engagement of “This Sporting Life” with the Little Carnegie Theatre (on West 57th Street). However, the 34th Street East had a gala invitational opening the night before, with attendees including one of the film’s stars, Rachel Roberts, and her then husband, Rex Harrison.

longislandmovies
longislandmovies on February 24, 2006 at 5:53 pm

the district office was in the 34th st east in the late 80s for cineplex odeon as was the Biograph booking dept.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on February 23, 2006 at 12:54 pm

The theatre was built by Walter Reade-Sterling and first opened in July, 1963 with the American premiere engagement of “This Sporting Life.” John J. McNamara was the architect. It was a conversion of a building that had once been an electrical power sub-station. The auditorium seated 410, including a loge section. Above the theatre were three floors of offices that became HQ for Walter Reade-Sterling.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on June 24, 2005 at 6:57 pm

barrygriffin, I suspect they are probably still there as Cineplex Odeon was quite un-interested in the prints. The Toronto office was dismissive of Sterling which was still operating as a service to schools and universities. I don’t know who owns these film rights today but there were some 35mm prints of high profile titles such as ROOM AT THE TOP and TEOREMA.

bgriffi
bgriffi on June 24, 2005 at 1:51 pm

Al Alvarez, I am looking for a title that would potentially have been in that basement full of Continental film prints from the Walter Reade era. Would you have any idea where they may have moved them or would you know who I could contact that may be able to help me? For more details, you can contact me

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on June 10, 2005 at 7:38 pm

You are correct BR. It was early 1990. Cineplex was trying to save money after the Garth Drabinsky debacle and did not have to pay extra rent here.

br91975
br91975 on June 10, 2005 at 8:53 am

Wouldn’t Cineplex Odeon have moved its offices to the 34th Street East Theatre building in the ‘80s (or maybe early '90s)? They didn’t enter the NYC marketplace – at least not formally – until 1987.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on June 4, 2005 at 4:26 pm

Walter Reade had its offices here until the New Ziegfeld opened when they moved there. Cineplex Odeon eventually moved their offices back here in the seventies and shut down the West 56th Street offices as well as the Ziegfeld office.

When I worked for Cineplex the basement was full of Continental Releasing film prints, Sterling Film 16mm documentaries and other relics of the Walter Reade era.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on April 7, 2005 at 12:16 am

Hardbop, that was the Murray Hill Cinema. (q.v.)

hardbop
hardbop on April 6, 2005 at 9:05 pm

There was a theatre on East 34th Street where part of the ceiling collapsed. I don’t think anyone was seriously injured. It was during the 1980s. I think it was this theatre. Anyone remember this?

RobertR
RobertR on April 4, 2005 at 7:31 pm

This was always a class house.

rcdt55b
rcdt55b on March 6, 2005 at 5:48 pm

That could be so. Cineplex had their offices there when they ran it. This theater had most of the orignal equipment in operation when it closed.

Astyanax
Astyanax on February 13, 2005 at 12:28 pm

I believe Walter Reade Organization headquarters were in offices above the theatre.

SethLewis
SethLewis on February 13, 2005 at 10:41 am

This was a Walter Reade theatre which shifted over to Cineplex Odeon during the 1986-7 buyout…It was a pretty safe bet in the 70s to day date with an 86th St and a Broadway Loews house for a first or showcase run…

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on February 13, 2005 at 10:03 am

Decades ago I used to go to this theatre from time to time when in New York. My stronget memories go back to the summer of 1965 when AFFS (the American Federation of Film Societies) had a number of special morning 35mm screenings at this then-very-spiffy place for members during one week. Among the films I saw there in those screenings were Munk’s “The Passenger,” Bertolucci’s “Before the Revolution,” Buñuel’s “Nazarin,” and Rossif’s “To Die in Madrid.” They were all revelations. The AFFS also had 16mm screenings that year in a room at the U.N. building.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on February 13, 2005 at 9:04 am

The address used by Yeshiva University is 239 East 34th Street. It is on a real estate listing as “Geraldine Schottenstein Cultural Center; a former movie theater turned into an auditorium by Yeshiva University”. The building is listed as being built in 1963. I don’t know if that coincides with the opening year of this theater.