Loew's Capitol Theatre

1645 Broadway,
New York, NY 10019

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Showing 26 - 50 of 879 comments

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on May 14, 2018 at 3:23 pm

I’m pretty sure it’s at the Village East only.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on May 14, 2018 at 2:18 pm

Hello-

oops! I meant to say Cinema 1 not “here”.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on May 14, 2018 at 2:18 pm

Hello-

another thought on the 50th Anniversary. no matter how WOW the new print supervised by Nolan is are they opening it here or the Village East because the Loews auditorium at the Lincoln Square and auditorium 12 at Regal 42 St. can’t show 70mm?

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on May 13, 2018 at 4:26 pm

A live clip of the credits and applause for Nolan and the daughter of Mr. Kubrick

https://www.pscp.tv/w/bcjAKTFZTEVKbk56UkxERU58MUJkeFlSWURXZVFLWP7R1USP3gyh-bn_zyGAWXLLcQcgR9FEXkrCrZvTwoEQ?t=55s

Cinema70
Cinema70 on May 13, 2018 at 3:28 pm

Monday, 14 May 2018

Reporting from Cannes 2001: a space odyssey screening completed yesterday (13 May 1968) at 21:27. Late getting this out. You will enjoy this as I have 50 years after several screenings at various USA locations in Cinerama/70mm from 1968-1970. Debussy Theatre, Cannes, France

Best wishes to all.
Thanks for your dedication and
enthusiasm.

walterk
walterk on May 11, 2018 at 12:43 pm

2001 will have what appears to be a one day showing at the Grand Lake Theatre in Oakland on August 24th, tickets not yet on sale.

Grand Lake website can be viewed here.

markp
markp on May 11, 2018 at 10:48 am

If it gets to the Regal E-Walk or AMC Lincoln Square, then I get to project it.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on May 10, 2018 at 7:31 pm

Two more “2001” 70mm engagements noted:

June 13-19: Santa Monica – Aero Theatre/American Cinematheque

July 26-August 5: New York – Museum of the Moving Image

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on May 9, 2018 at 12:34 pm

Awesome. Thanks!

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on May 9, 2018 at 12:27 pm

To answer another part of your question, IAMMMMW was filmed in Ultra Panavision 70, which used anamorphic lenses. The lenses for Super Panavision 70, the system used in 2001, are spherical, not anamorphic.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on May 9, 2018 at 12:20 pm

Unlike IAMMMMW, I don’t believe there were ever any rectified prints struck for 2001 to be shown on the deeply curved Cinerama screens during its initial run. And even had there been, without any curved screens in existence today (save for the Cinerama Dome in LA or Martin Theatre in Seattle), it would make no sense to have the new prints rectified for the curvature.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on May 9, 2018 at 12:13 pm

Okay, my brother asked me this and I have no idea of the answer. Anyone?: Was 2001 filmed in anamorphic 70mm ala “Mad World”? And, if so, are the new prints the same or are they adjusted optically to a non-anamorphic/flat image? He wants to know if what we see now is really the same as what we saw in 1968 at the Cinerama theatre. Thanks for any insight!

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on May 8, 2018 at 2:35 pm

Bigjoe…. The new 70mm print is NOT remastered or restored in anyway. As we’ve been discussing at some length, these showings will be of a few fresh prints that have been struck from the interpositives, which themselves were made back in 1999. Of course it would be wonderful if every city had a screen as big as those of yore (or even the Ziegfeld) but these prints should look pretty fantastic – and completely analog – on any size screen. Go find the biggest screen you can, grab a seat dead center and close up, and enjoy the ride!

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on May 8, 2018 at 1:58 pm

Hello-

to markp thank you your reply. as I said in a recent post unless the newly remastered 70MM print of 2001 personally supervised by Nolan is shown in a theater with a really big screen why bother? to repeat myself its like showing a newly remastered 70MM print of Lawrence of Arabia at the Cinema 2.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on May 8, 2018 at 9:12 am

The LA Times piece doesn’t say that the original negative no longer exists. It says that the interpositives (I’ll have to look that up) used to make the new prints were made from the original negative in 1999.

stevenj
stevenj on May 8, 2018 at 8:52 am

Here is one of the articles I mentioned that I had read on the new 2001 70mm prints. LA Times May 3

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on May 8, 2018 at 6:15 am

Cinema70… I’m interested in knowing what happened to the original camera negative for 2001? You mean to say MGM and Kubrick allowed the negative to be mishandled or destroyed? That’s almost unthinkable!

markp
markp on May 8, 2018 at 4:46 am

bigjoe59, thank you for your comment regarding showing 70MM at the Lincoln Square and Regal E Walk. As you may or may not know, when a 70MM film comes into those venues it is myself and my team that does the projection. I have been in contact with Warner Bros who told me if it gets booked into either venue I will be called. As of now their plan is to only book it thru summers end, but it could go into the fall. I still hold out hope. I’m also keeping tabs on the upcoming reissue of Sound of Music in 70MM. I only want to give the public the best presentation they deserve.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on May 7, 2018 at 6:36 pm

The only unanswered question is whether we should smoke a little something before seeing the movie.

Cinema70
Cinema70 on May 7, 2018 at 6:11 pm

Greetings and Thank You every one for your interests in motion picture theatres past and present, and certain important films in the history of the cinema. Referencing “2001: a space odyssey”: No original Super Panavision and Todd-AO 65mm camera negatives exist. The internegatives, labeled per shot number and referenced to the script, are separately on core and stored in corresponding number cans. An internegative is a contact print made with positive reversal film. A second internegative is produced for editing of final proposed release print. There are instances when three black and white color sensitive (cyan, yellow and magenta) are made for preservation/archival purposes. When articles state “original camera negative”, they are not being used for this facsimile of a 70mm release print. To be authentic, the 70mm prints would use magnetic tracks that provide better sound, especially the missing acoustic sound element that digital erroneously attempts to create in the amplification process. Now regardless of the source materials for this 50th presentation, I am so glad to see your excitement concerning such. You deserve this momentous point in time and the special journey each of you take through the “star gate” of past, present and future. Your a great crew on a great website. Best wishes.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on May 7, 2018 at 4:23 pm

When a film is restored and remastered, these days, the process generally entails digitally scanning the original negative into a computer at very high resolution (I think 4K is the current standard) and then digitally restoring the image frame by frame using professional computer applications. I also believe the negative, if not well cared for, is physically “cleaned” in some chemical way before the scan. In the case of 2001, I’m guessing the original negative has been through a cleaning process last time there was a BluRay release, and more likely than not, it is already maintained in pretty good shape. Nolan is bypassing the digital restoration (and any restoration for that matter) for these screenings, and striking new 70mm prints from that original camera negative. No digital interference at all.

stevenj
stevenj on May 7, 2018 at 3:50 pm

I have read on several sites that this new 70mm print of 2001 is “unrestored”. A remastered, restored blu ray is going to be released later this year but what I took from the articles I read was that new 70mm prints have been struck from the original camera negative. Wondering if someone who knows more about the difference in these processes than I can explain.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on May 7, 2018 at 1:30 pm

Hello-

to Bill H. I recently saw Ready Player One at the main auditorium of the Village East. it didn’t impress as being anywhere near the size of screen at the Ziegfeld. since the Ziegfeld is no longer with us the place to show Nolan’s personally supervised frame by frame digital restoration of 2001 in 70MM would be the Loews auditorium at the Loews Lincoln Square or auditorium 12 at the Regal 42 St.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on May 7, 2018 at 12:52 pm

Mike: when a 70mm screening of 2001 is on a less-than-really-big screen, like at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, which shows it every summer, I head straight for the front row. I once saw it from the front row at the Uptown in DC and it was literally overwhelming, though maybe not the best way to see it for the first time. Lots of head-turning was involved, but I had seen it many times before.