Loew's Capitol Theatre

1645 Broadway,
New York, NY 10019

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Showing 1 - 25 of 974 comments

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 22, 2019 at 2:38 pm

Hello-

to vindanpar- if you got the same Blu-ray of The Fall of the Roman Empire that I did you’re bound to ne disappointed since its not in the correct aspect ratio.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on September 20, 2019 at 1:17 pm

WTF. PLSWATGI. TAU-FWTAS…

(What the f-ck. Please let’s stop with all the goddamn initials. There are user-friendlier ways to abbreviate something…)

vindanpar
vindanpar on September 20, 2019 at 12:52 pm

I got that TFOTRE bluray. Haven’t seen it yet.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 15, 2019 at 1:10 pm

Hello-

to Ken Roe thanks for the info. I got the Blu-ray you made note of and was rather disappointed by the incorrect aspect ration. a botched job just like The Hallelujah Trail. all the other Blu-ray discs I have of films shot in Ultra Panavision 70 are in the correct 2.75.1 aspect ratio.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on September 14, 2019 at 6:23 am

bigjoe59: “The Fall of the Roman Empire” was released on Blu-Ray in the UK in 2.35.1 aspect ratio. Anchor Bay Entertainment/The Weinstein Company Home Entertainmet.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 13, 2019 at 3:46 pm

Hello-

to vindanpar- I am one of those fans that was rather disappointed by Kino Lorber’s recent blu-ray of The Hallelujah Trail. aside form the fact the perfect image was a bit off its was in the 2.35.2 aspect ratio not 2.75.1 since it was as you stated shot in Ultra-Panavison 70. if a blu-ray disc of The Fall of the Roman Empire ever comes out it had better be in the 2.75.1 aspect ratio.

vindanpar
vindanpar on September 13, 2019 at 3:07 pm

As per CC’s new photo I wonder if The Hallelujah Trail negative still exists in the UA Archive or at least a Super Panavision print. I understand the bluray was taken from a 35mm print and is supposedly very poor and a big disappointment. One wonders why they waste such an opportunity and anger fans and lessen the possibility of a better release in the future.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 13, 2019 at 2:35 pm

Hello-

to Bill H.– its highly possible I saw the original cut. I bought my ticket when the box office first opened.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 12, 2019 at 4:38 pm

The timetable is from Jerome Agel’s 1970 book “The Making of Kubrick’s 2001”.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 12, 2019 at 4:36 pm

According to this 2001 timetable, the long version was shown at the Capitol for only three days.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on September 9, 2019 at 1:01 pm

The Life magazine article about the cuts is also included in the Photos section

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 9, 2019 at 11:42 am

Hello-

to Bill H.– its my understanding that the original cut of 2001 did play for a short time after opening night premiere but for how long?

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on September 8, 2019 at 11:30 pm

Those Variety scribes sure knew how to write a socko review…

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 8, 2019 at 5:45 pm

Here is Part 1 of a 3-part clipping of the Variety review from August 1939 mentioned by Comfortably Cool (Judy Garland-Mickey Rooney stage show). All 3 parts are in the Photos section.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 8, 2019 at 4:53 pm

Thanks, bigjoe. If I was a few years older than 13 in 1968, I would have gone back again and again. I still have my program also, though it’s a little frayed around the edges. I remember it cost $1. Unless you saw it about two or three days after opening day, you saw the version with 19 minutes removed from it by Kubrick. A college film student, who later went on to be a Hollywood producer, wrote an angry letter to the New York Times complaining that the studio had butchered the film, not knowing that it was done by Kubrick himself in an effort to improve it.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 8, 2019 at 3:55 pm

Hello-

I got a kick out the caption for the ad for 2001 on pg.1 of the photo page. well I can go one better. one of the good things about being 68 is having seen 2001 not once but twice during its roadshow engagement at this theater in Cinerama. the visual and audio experience was !!! WOW !!!. I still have the beautifully designed souvenir program. now whether in either of my 2 viewings I saw the original cut before Kubrick tweaked it I have no idea.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on September 8, 2019 at 3:14 pm

I just happen to have that issue lying around… wait, it was here a minute ago, let me check…

Comfortably Cool
Comfortably Cool on September 8, 2019 at 1:20 pm

Each “Oz” stage show ran for about half-an-hour, including a 5-minute overture by a 21-piece orchestra. There were from five to seven stage performances daily, depending on the day of the week. Mickey Rooney finished on August 30th, replaced by Ray Bolger and Bert Lahr until the engagement closed on September 6th. A lengthy review of opening day can be found in weekly Variety’s issue of August 23rd, 1939.

vindanpar
vindanpar on September 7, 2019 at 6:27 pm

So how many shows per day? Seven days? How many weeks? How many songs did Garland sing in a show? I’m sure Rooney was climbing the proscenium at every one of them.

MarkDHite
MarkDHite on August 14, 2019 at 2:16 pm

First, but not only. Thanks for the reminder!

Comfortably Cool
Comfortably Cool on August 14, 2019 at 1:21 pm

August 17th will mark the 80th anniversary of the legendary launching of “The Wizard of Oz” at the Capitol Theatre, which included a special stage revue starring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney. It was the first and only “live” offering at the Capitol since the theatre switched to movies only in 1935. Advertisement displayed here

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 17, 2019 at 12:59 pm

If you look at the diagram for the screens at the UA Cinema 150 in Long Island in its photo section you will see that the D150 screen is larger than the Todd AO/70mm screen.

This is the only reason I can figure out why that the first presentation of 2001 was so much more impressive. It might have been on the D150 screen rather than the 70mm screen. Obviously the same screen but as I stated above with different apertures.

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 16, 2019 at 9:35 pm

Yes. I’ll never forget it. One of my all time great cinema experiences. Just too young to have seen it first run at the Capitol or Warner Cinerama.

I believe it was Columbus Day of ‘77. It played at the Rivoli twice. First time the print said Cinerama at the end. Second time the print said Super Panavision 70. The Cinerama print was so much more spectacular. I know this is confusing and obviously the Rivoli did not play Cinerama films but I’m sure Martin Hart would know why different 70mm prints would have different film process logos on them.

And then somebody once said the Rivoli had two different 70mm screen apertures. Ok I know this sounds crazy but you paid more money for the larger one which was the D150 screen. He said Universal refused to pay for the larger screen so Sweet Charity played on the smaller one. So I’m assuming the first 2001 print played using the larger aperture. Perhaps the difference was slight but I do remember during the second run it was less visually imposing. Or was it that the first impression was so overwhelming the second viewing couldn’t live up to it? Well it was over 40 years ago and the Rivoli is long gone so now who knows.

Al Alvarez
Al Alvarez on June 16, 2019 at 5:51 pm

You saw it at the Rivoli?

vindanpar
vindanpar on June 16, 2019 at 5:44 pm

Which is why I haven’t seen 2001 since I last saw it at the Rivoli decades ago. What’s the point? Love reading about it and watching youtube docs about it though. I guess you get the experience going to the Cinerama theaters on the west coast but it seems like it will never happen again in NY. I bet the Capitol Cinerama screen was larger than those anyway.

Interesting that the actor who was so brilliant as the voice of HAL Douglas Hain considered the two day recording session a joke and never bothered seeing the film. Huh? At least that’s what I found out on the internet. He died last year.