Paris Theatre

4 West 58th Street,
New York, NY 10019

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Showing 51 - 75 of 187 comments

LuisV
LuisV on February 20, 2008 at 2:08 pm

Thanks LI, that makes me happy. I think New York has the best chance of keeping the Paris as an active movie house when it’s in the hands of a billionaire who has lots of other money and doesn’t need another source of major cash.

I kind of have the same thoughts about the Fisher family owning the Ziegfeld. I would hope that they realize what a treasure that theater is and would not sell it or gut it just for profit. I understand that it is under a long term land lease, but I’m not sure how long it is for. I guess that is for discussion on The Ziegfeld’s page. I would just hope that it is landmarked before that lease is up.

longislandmovies
longislandmovies on February 20, 2008 at 11:36 am

Solow does still own tbe theater.It is managed by Jacobs Entertainment.

LuisV
LuisV on February 20, 2008 at 9:18 am

So is this theater still operated by Solow? The site of the Paris has to be one of the most valuable retail sites in the city; especially now that the Plaza has been redone. The Solow Tower gets some of the highest office rents in the city and it is obvious that Solow (if in fact he still runs the Paris) he is not totally focussed on money. Anybody else who held the Paris probably would have sold out to retail a long time ago. Hopefully, The Paris will be around for decades to come. Like many comments above, I agree that this small house shows that you don’t have to be big to be a palace. This intimate theater is about understated elegance and it is a pleasure to see a film in.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on February 3, 2008 at 5:37 am

This obscure film from Italy (La Fuga, about a lesbian relationship), played here in March 1966.

dave-bronx™
dave-bronx™ on February 2, 2008 at 9:39 pm

The lease had expired and the landlord had no intention of negotiating a new one with Pathe, he had made a deal with Loews. I was the manager at the time and I handed the keys over to the Loews people. Pathe had intended to open up at a different location and use the Paris name there, and they removed their signs from the 58th St. theatre which we donated to the Museum of the Moving Image over in Astoria. Sheldon Solow and Loews (landlord and partner) re-named the theatre Fine Arts. Pathe’s local representative was scouting out locations. Shortly thereafter, Pathe in France, fell on hard times and the French equivalent of bankruptcy and reorganization. Their plans for a replacement outlet in New York were scrapped and their local representative let go. It was after this that the Paris signs went back up at the theatre at 4 W. 58th St. Still later, the Loews/Solow partnership broke up, and Solow went solo with the Paris.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on February 2, 2008 at 6:41 pm

Loew’s Paris Fine Arts Theater in 1994 according to this NY Times review of the “Browning Version” on October 12, 1994.

This stately, prettily photographed “Browning Version,” which opens today at Loew’s Paris Fine Arts Theater, does not have the sharpness of Mr. Figgis’s “Internal Affairs” or the atmospheric style of his “Stormy Monday.” The camera relies on a clumsy, blunt way of capturing the most obvious reactions.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on February 2, 2008 at 6:25 pm

url=http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C0CE2DB1338F932A3575AC0A966958260&scp=1&sq=Pathe+FINE+ARTS+theater&st=nyt]Here[/url] is one NY Times article dated September 1, 1990 that mentions Loews Fine Arts. In case the link doesn’t work, here is portion of the article.

The 586-seat theater, which was a favorite among generations of foreign-film enthusiasts and a familiar feature of the midtown cityscape, will remain open – at least for the short term – under the management of Loews Theaters as the Loews Fine Arts. But representatives of Pathe Cinema, which operated the theater, charged that the building’s owners forced the Paris out in order to negotiate a short-term lease that would allow them to convert the theater into retail space within a few years.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on February 2, 2008 at 5:43 pm

Pathe did not return.

Loews renamed their theaters Sony after its owner, but after merger with Cineplex Odeon, the Loews name returned. So, Sony and Loews was the same operator. I think Loews stayed longer. My notes indicte maybe until 1997. When Sony Lincoln Square opened, arthouse movies often began there.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 2, 2008 at 5:38 pm

In September of 1990 Pathe lost their lease at this location. They decided to re-open elsewhere so they removed the marquee and moved out. Loews took over and renamed the location LOEWS FINE ARTS.

In late 1992 it became LOEWS PARIS FINE ARTS and by summer 1993 it was the PARIS once again without Loews' involvement. Either Pathe returned or the landlord bought the rights to the name, as it never did open elsewhere.

Advertisements and the marquee were changed and news stories are available along with a “goodbye” ad in the NYT from Pathe when they lost the lease.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on February 2, 2008 at 5:33 pm

It is no secret, but well known. I think it was after Pathe’s lease was up, when Sony leased it that Fine Arts was the name.

longislandmovies
longislandmovies on February 2, 2008 at 5:29 pm

i can find out monday as there film buyer books my theater..

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on February 2, 2008 at 4:49 pm

What is your evidence to support “Fine Arts” as an alternate name? Advertising? News report? I don’t recall the name change, nor does it even make sense to me why that would have been done.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on February 2, 2008 at 1:34 pm

Fine Arts should be listed as an alternative name for this location although it was only for a short time in the early nineties.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on October 11, 2007 at 11:56 am

Warren, I wrote World Premiere. When it was posted by the editor Premiere became Premier. I understand the spelling has since been changed. As to caps, I like it that way.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on October 11, 2007 at 9:45 am

And one should never start a sentence with “And” either but who really cares.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on October 11, 2007 at 9:29 am

Howard, the term is “world premiere,” without capitals. And in the introduction to the Loew’s State listing, you have it as “World Premier,” which is also incorrect. It should be “world premiere,” not “world premier.”

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on October 10, 2007 at 10:04 pm

That’s a shame. I wonder if a theatrical run of CE3K will happen at all for the anniversary. Perhaps the strong numbers for the “Blade Runner” engagement at the Ziegfeld will encourage a booking. Perhaps even via Digital Cinema Presentation (though I know Spielberg is a big proponent of film). Better still would be a 70MM run, but I doubt we’ll be so lucky..

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on October 9, 2007 at 11:14 pm

A week and a half ago, I saw “The Rape of Europa.” Don’t miss! It is a great film. You learn much, but it is also more entertaining than many current commercial feature films!

Ed, I asked about “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” Staff told me it isn’t going to happen despite earlier expectations or hopes. Hmmm…that film had its World Premiere at the Ziegfeld…..

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on September 8, 2007 at 12:43 am

I wonder what’s going on with plans for a 30th anniversary theatrical run of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” here. According the theatre’s website, the documentary “The Rape of Europa” will start a run at the Paris on September 14th, right after the current engagement of “La Vie En Rose” ends its long run. No word on CE3K at all at the website.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on July 23, 2007 at 11:15 pm

When I saw La Vie En Rose a month ago, which is still playing, the Paris leaflet stated Coming Soon: Close Encounters of the Third Kind-30th Anniv engagement- 2 WEEKS ONLY!, and Youth Without Youth, Francis Ford Coppola’s first film in ten years, an extraordinary love story wrapped in a grand mystery.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on July 18, 2007 at 9:06 am

The Paris, Loew’s Paradise, and an unnamed Times Square cinema are prominently mentioned in this article from yesterday’s New York Times: www.nytimes.com/2007/07/17/nyregion/17ink.html?

dave-bronx™
dave-bronx™ on July 5, 2007 at 1:24 am

Jacobs is the last name of the guy who booked the Angelika for Joe Salah. Salah, btw, apparently passed away in April in Paris (sounds like the name of a song…). Thanks to CT member astrocks for that info.