State Theatre

703 S. Broadway,
Los Angeles, CA 90014

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Showing 51 - 75 of 127 comments

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on February 26, 2008 at 7:15 am

Here is a January 1935 ad from the LA Times:
http://tinyurl.com/23sge8

stevebob
stevebob on February 21, 2008 at 10:35 am

It’s a convention here at Cinema Treasures to list a theater by the name by which it’s currently, or was most recently, known. (Not everyone agrees with the sensibility of this policy; a post on the Loew’s Capitol page points out, for instance, that it was known simply as the Capitol for most of its life until the final few years.)

Consistency, though, would seem to suggest that this theater be listed here as “The State” and, secondarily, also known as “Loew’s State.” It passed into Metropolitan’s hands nearly 50 years ago, after all, and at that time all indications of the former association with Loew’s were removed. Signage from that point forward read “The State,” and — so far as I am aware — it became generally known thenceforth as “The State.”

While those who share our special interest know this theater was once Loew’s State, there are generations of people now who never knew it by that name and quite possibly never even heard it referred to as such.

Patsy
Patsy on February 1, 2008 at 9:50 am

In the current issue of Reminisce there is a letter on the Reminisent page that talks about this theatre. It reads as follows: “Clayton Durbin, a Los Angeles native now living in Wichita Kansas, added that the Loew’s State Theatre on the left of the photo (photo in the Aug/Sept issue) and the KRKD radio tower on the right are still on Broadway. He noted that many dignitaries were honored in parades through that intersection.”

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on October 19, 2007 at 7:29 am

Here is a 1954 ad from the LA Times:
http://tinyurl.com/25mvlx

William
William on September 14, 2007 at 7:43 am

At different times during it’s history the State Theatre was operated by different chains while being known as the Loew’s State. Fox West Coast Theatres operated and booked other UA Theatres during the 30s & 40s till the 1950’s. The United Artists Theatre Downtown was operated by Publix Chain.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on September 14, 2007 at 7:11 am

Here is a 1953 ad showing the State as part of the UA chain:
http://tinyurl.com/265sz3

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 19, 2007 at 6:22 pm

Here is a July 1957 ad for the United Artists State from the LA Times:
http://tinyurl.com/2crl3l

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 11, 2007 at 12:10 am

It looked to be in good shape when I was in there last month.

LAOPERAMAN
LAOPERAMAN on August 10, 2007 at 11:15 pm

I heard it through the grapevine that when the Cult’s, er, I mean Church’s lease it up, the Owners do not intend to renew it. Rumor has it that the owners intend on a major restoration/renovation on this theatre to make it a major road house for touring musicals……
Hmmmm……………

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 3, 2007 at 4:20 pm

OK. There are some errors in the database.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on August 3, 2007 at 4:15 pm

Ken,
Spellbound was made in 1945. The photo has to be from at least 1945.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on July 18, 2007 at 6:53 pm

Here is an article from the LA Times dated 11/13/32. Mr. Wright’s age at his passing hit a little too close to home, for me at least:

Homer Wright, Former Theater Manager, Dies

Stricken with a sudden heart seizure and hour or so after he had retired for the evening, apparently in excellent health, Homer B. Wright, 46 years of age, former manager of Loew’s State and Chinese Theaters, died early yesterday at his home. He was a Mason and a Shriner.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on July 17, 2007 at 3:12 pm

I was inside this theater today. I tried to ask permission to take photos, but no one spoke English. I took that as a negative affirmation. The theater is very well kept inside. My camera has a weak flash, but hopefully the pictures will be OK when I post them later.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on May 29, 2007 at 2:31 pm

The information accompanying this photo gives the date as 1955, but looking at the cars on the street I’d guess it’s as much as a decade earlier- probably the early post-war years. Anyway, here’s a view of Broadway with the Loew’s State vertical sign prominently featured.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on May 25, 2007 at 4:50 pm

Here is a blurb from the LA Times on the State’s opening, dated 11/12/21:

DOORS TO OPEN TONIGHT.
State Theater Will be Honored by Presence of Many Stars of Stage and Screenland. STATE THEATER OPENS TONIGHT. Distinguished Guests, Will View First Program
Screen Stars to Appear in Impromptu Stunts
“Liliom” in Film Version is Headliner. Playing Leading Roles in Housewarming. STATE THEATER OPENS TONIGHT.

With Gov. Stephens in one box and Mayor Cryer in the other, and Marcus Loew, together with at least thirty noted motion-picture stars in the audience, Loew’s State Theater will open its doors tonight. A feature program is announced, to be preceded by many clever impromptu stunts in which some of the most prominent members of the local theatrical world will appear.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on May 19, 2007 at 9:22 am

I immigrated to LA from New Jersey in 1984. On my first night here, I stayed at a fleabag hotel at 13th and Olive, across from a fire station, which of course meant no sleep. The next morning, I perambulated down Olive to Broadway. It was appalling. I almost called a cab and went back to the airport.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on May 18, 2007 at 7:40 pm

Ken mc: By 1966 the State had been part of the Corwins' Metropolitan Circuit for at least a few years. The photo is interesting for other reasons too, though. Look how tidy the street and sidewalk are. There are a couple of scraps of paper in the gutter, but those white spots on the sidewalk are probably from dust specks on the photograph negative. That’s how I remember Broadway and most of downtown being through the 1960s. When I returned in the early 1980s, after more than a decade’s absence, the street was one long strew of trash, most of it from fast food places, and somebody had virtually paved the sidewalks with dried chewing gum.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on May 18, 2007 at 1:03 pm

Here is a 1966 photo. It’s interesting because Loew’s has been taken off the marquee, and it just says “The State”. Perhaps a change of ownership:
http://tinyurl.com/ytgne9

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on May 4, 2007 at 5:15 am

Clifton’s is still open, I think. Their jello is top shelf.

reluctantpopstar
reluctantpopstar on May 4, 2007 at 4:27 am

I saw a couple of shows here in its very last days of movies, probably 1995, because the film was MONEY TRAIN with Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson. I think they were doing second run at that point. The second feature was ACE VENTURA: WHEN NATURE CALLS, which was so bad I walked out and had dinner at Clifton’s.

I’m very upset that I didn’t come down to downtown more often and take in some more shows while they were still going on. Now I live here, but at that time I lived in the Valley and it was somewhat of a trial to get down here.

At that point, the only other operating theater in downtown was the Palace, who were showing English films with Spanish subtitles. I saw something there at least once, maybe it was “The Net” with Sandra Bullock? The subtitles were really distracting.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on March 3, 2007 at 3:19 pm

Here is a larger version of the photo at the top of the page:
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics32/00065592.jpg

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on December 7, 2006 at 2:55 pm

Robby the Robot made a personal appearance here in March 1956 to promote “Forbidden Planet”, but to refer to him as a “monster” as it does in this L.A. Times ad is not only inaccurate, but more than a little insulting :)

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