Comments from Simon L. Saltzman

Showing 76 - 100 of 123 comments

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 9, 2005 at 10:29 am

Vincent, you must not be watching the TCM channel. “H.M Pulham,Esq” is a charming and witty film directed by King Vidor and based on a story by John P. Marquand. It stars the gorgeous Hedy Lamarr as the woman who encourages proper Bostonion Robert Young out of his shell. It received rave reviews and did excellent business.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 9, 2005 at 9:34 am

Hey Vincent, this will clear up your question whether the Christmas show always played through the New Year. In 1935, “The Littlest Rebel” played only 11 days (split week)Dec 19 -29 with “Magnificent Obsession” opening on the 30th, also playing 10 days (another rare split week). In 1936, “Rainbow on the River” played Dec 17 – 30. The Girl from Paris (Lili Pons) opened on the 31st. In 1937, “I’ll Take Romance (Grace Moore) played Dec 16 – 29. "Tovarich” opened on the 30th. In 1938, “A Christmas Carol” played one hot week Dec. 22 – 28. “Topper Takes a Trip” opened Dec 29 also for just one week. In 1939, “Balalaika” played Dec 14 – 27. “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” opened on Dec 28. That of course, brings us back to “No No Nanette.” However, in 1941, “ HM Pulham Esq” played Dec 18 – 30. “Babes on Broadway” opened on Dec 31. Anyway that sort of establishes that the Christmas show didn’t always make it into the New Year.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 8, 2005 at 1:42 pm

The opening of “Kiss Me Kate” was very well timed and thought out. It played 4 very satisfactory weeks during November 1953 and over the traditionally slow Thanksgiving season. That primed it for its wide Christmas release. It followed a hugely successful 5 week run of “Mogambo.” The stage show with “Mogombo” was a salute to air-travel and featured the simulated flight of a huge jet liner across the stage. Does anyone remember more detail?

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 8, 2005 at 10:43 am

The Bette Davis film that BoxOfficBill refers to is “Payment on Demand” (not “No Down Payment). Also the original and long publicized title of the Davis film was "Story of a Divorce.” It was changed just before the opening.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 8, 2005 at 6:59 am

Can any of the projectionists remember this. I seem to remember (or am I dreaming?) that showings of “Kiss Me Kate” were projected in both 3-D and regular…either alternately on the same day or every other day.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 7, 2005 at 11:28 am

More trivia: The executive entrance on 50th Street was also used by guests of the management, celebraties, and preferred patrons, who could walk down a few steps, be greeted at the desk then escorted by an usher on to the executive elevator and taken directly to the first mezzanine.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 7, 2005 at 10:36 am

I’m wondering if the RCMH patrons who had first mezzanine reserved seats could enter that way and avoid the crowds, lines and general chaos of the lobby. The Metropolitan Opera also allows patrons who have dinner reservations on the Grand Tier to use the entrance located in the underground shopping and garage area.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Feb 6, 2005 at 5:00 pm

The underground boxoffice was also very useful in that large prepaid -groups could be guided there to gain entrance to the theater and avoid conflict the patrons waiting in the street line. However, as far as my memory serves, the underground boxoffice was closed to individual patron ticket sales when there was a street line. As you can surmise, it would have been unfair to allow admittance to the theater by this little known route while others (possibly)were waiting in the rain and snow.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 30, 2005 at 3:33 pm

It’s interesting that during all this talk about the Christmas show, no one has mentioned another seasonal and religious-oriented tradition: “Kol Nidre” that was presented every September (app.)during the high Jewish holy days. Like the “Nativity,” it preceded a regular show with the Rockettes, ballet, choral ensemble and symphony orchestra. The traditional “Kol Nidre” melody was played by a solo cellist at stage left and sung in cantorial style by a solist (seen) the choral ensemble (unseen). The backdrop was simply rolling clouds. There was no accompanying narrative, but it was reverential, brief, and tasteful. I can’t tell you when it began or how many years it remained a tradition.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 4, 2005 at 4:19 pm

Thanks BoxOffice Bill. However when “Anastasia” played there, the house had already converted to an “all ice” program sans Ave Maria. However the stage show at the time Anastasia played was quite lovely and featured a Christmas in Japan finale that featured a stunning backdrop of Matsumoto mountain.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 4, 2005 at 2:47 pm

Does anyone remember the “Ave Maria” prologue that the Roxy Theater presented each Christmas season? Of course, it could not compete with the Music Hall’s more spectacular “Nativity,” but it was (almost) a tradition there.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 2, 2005 at 10:28 pm

BoxofficeBill is right. I remembered it (incorrectly)as part of the stage show (the film was Executive Suite)whose theme was Cherry Blossom time in D.C. and featured the corps de ballet.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Jan 2, 2005 at 12:49 pm

Does anyone remember the stunning tapestry-like “Cherry Blossom” curtain – a gift from Japan – that was also featured in many shows during the 1950s?

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 22, 2004 at 10:52 am

Don’t forget that that in 1933 this was the very first Christmas show and was not yet a traditon, nor was the holiday time off as extended for school children and workers as it soon became. Also Fred and Ginger didn’t even get top billing in “Flying Down to Rio.” The stars were Raul Julian (?) and Dolores Del Rio. They didn’t sell tickets on their own until “The Gay Divorcee” opened in 1934 and grossed “$96,800 and $80,000 in its two week run Nov 15 – 28. "Roberta” was their next hit there..also two weeks $99,000 and $90,000 (March 7 – 20, 1935). “Top Hat” went through the roof in 1935 with $134,000, $115,000, $98,900 from Aug 29 – Sept 18. Nothing came close in attendance or gross for many years. “Follow the Fleet” and “Swing Time” were also mammoth 3-week hits in 1936. Getting back to “Little Women,” it got raves and was a classic with a waiting public. There were no extra performances, however mornings and afternoon shows were always sold out due to large family attendance. Sorry about the last line in my note above. “Cavalcade” also was a huge hit during Easter week of 1933 grossing $100,00.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 21, 2004 at 7:43 pm

Answer to Joe Vogel: The RKO Roxy opened on Dec 29. It was soon renamed the Center Theater following a law suit between the orginal Roxy Theater at 7th Ave and 50th Street and the new management at RKO Center (what we now know as Rockefeller Center). The Center theater had 3,700 seats and was operated as a presentation house i.e. film and stage show. The opening attraction was “The Animal Kingdom” starring Leslie Howard and Ann Harding and was a great success grossing $71,000, $60,000 and $40,000 during its three week run. (Most films that opened at the RCMH during the first couple of years rarely went past one week. However all subsequent films died at the Center Theater when the RCMH switched to films and stage shows beginning January 11, 1933. (It was also the Depression).It’s interesting to note that the Center Theater with almost half the seating capacity of the RCMH drew bigger crowds during its opening weeks than did the RCMH. For whatever it’s worth, here are the admission prices for the Center Theater. Prices changed at noon and 6Pm. Mon-Fri $35; $.55; $.72 Saturday $.83 $.94 $.1.10 and $1.65 for mezzanine reserved seats for evening shows.

For all you trivia buffs: “King Kong” played day and date at the Center Theater and the Radio City Music Hall for it first week only. It grossed $88,000 at the RCMH and then played exclusively for the next two weeks at the Center Theater. The grosses there were $35,000; $35,000 and $33,800.

Did you know that “Flying Down to Rio” with Fred and Ginger was the film that accompanied the first Christmas stage show in 1933. It opened on Dec 21 and played two weeks through January 3. It grossed $98,000 and $100,000. Very fine, but it didn’t break the previous house record of $118,000 set during November by “Little Women.” Ittle eber the previous Easter week by “Cavalcade.” Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all of you.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 15, 2004 at 4:10 pm

Answer to CConnolly: To the best of my knowledge, the Rockettes have appeared in every show but one beginning in January 1933 (througout the golden “olden days”) Leonidoff produced a one-hour version of the opera “Madama Butterfly” for two weeks in 1934. Obviously no spot for 36 tapping geisha girls.The first week of “Madama Butterfly” accompanied the film “Twentieth Century” May 3 – 9 and the second holdover week for the stage show played with “Change of Heart” with Janet Gaynor May 10 – 16. If anyone knows of another show with the famed 36, let me know.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Dec 14, 2004 at 2:58 pm

Answer to Vincent about the number of Rockettes: The Rockettes were traditonally 36 dancers, but 46 were on the payroll. Each Rockette would work 7 days for 3 weeks with the 4th week off. The extra ten Rockettes allowed for the rotation, plus illness etc. One thing that many of us remember from the old days was how versatile the Rockettes were. They were often brought back in certain shows augment the 24 member ballet company and were just as good on their toes as in their tap shoes. The reverse was true for the ballet company. Some shows boasted a company of 100 (check out some of the early newspaper ads), including the choral ensemble or glee club.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Nov 29, 2004 at 8:19 pm

Imagine standing on line for 3 hours to see one of the best Christmas shows ever at the Music Hall and it only lasted 22 minutes. That was when “Sayonara” was the 152 minute feature. The Nativity was only 7 minutes long followed by a 2 minute overture. The Rockettes did their traditonal 6 minute routine as 36 tapping Santas,followed by the 7 minutes Underseas Kingdom finale featuring Kirby’s flying ballet. How about .95 before noon; 1.25 noon to 6pm and 1.50 6pm to closing. 1st Mezzanine reserved seats were 1.80 matinees and 2.40 for all evenings and Saturday and Sunday. Eat your heart out.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Nov 22, 2004 at 11:06 am

Yes, Wayne battled an octopus in both “Wake…” and “Reap…” The only difference was the former was in black and white and the latter in Technicolor.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Nov 21, 2004 at 8:43 pm

“Cavalcade” (Opened April 6, 1933 and closed April 19) was the first film to be held over for a second week at the Music Hall. It grossed $110,000 in its second week (Easter week) topping the first week gross of $105,000. It was the highest grossing film up to that point. The previous top week was “Topaz” (Feb 9-15) with the help of Amos and Andy in the stage show. “Cavalcade” held the record until “Little Women” opened on November 12 and grossed $118,000 (with a slight hike in the top admission price from .99 to $1.05. and played an unprecedented 3 weeks. No film came close to the record until “Top Hat” opened on August 29, 1935 and grossed $134,000. It also played 3 weeks. No other film came close for many years. In general, attendance at the Music Hall was very spotty (many weeks in the red) until the start of World War II. The boom years lasted about 18 years from 1942 to 1960).

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 30, 2004 at 1:35 pm

It’s worth mentioning that when “Gilda” played RCMH, they had no policy regarding children as long as they were accompanied by an adult. However, when “Gilda” went to the nabes, it was a different story. I remember my aunt being turned away by the manager who stood by the boxoffice at the Ritz Theater in Elizabeth, N.J. I remember him saying to her, “Sorry, this film is for adults only.” We did go to see “Forever Amber” at the Roxy, because she was afraid she would be turned away at Proctor’s in Newark, if she had me with her. (I had one of those wonderful aunts that mold your life) Nabes were much stricter about whom they sold tickets to.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 29, 2004 at 10:09 pm

Vincent: Record breaker for both attendance and gross “The Jolson Story” played Loews State, as did “Jolson Sings Again.”

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 28, 2004 at 5:22 pm

Vincent: The first Broadway show to use a stage mike was Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “South Pacific” in 1949. It was a decision made by the composers out of town before New York and was thought quite innovative. The first body mikes were subsequently used by Lena Horn in “Jamaica” (1957)and Anna Maria Alberghetti in “Carnival.” (1961)

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 23, 2004 at 7:26 am

For “Organized”: Although I never met “Ray”, the theater staff was often able to tell the difference in musical style between him and Dick Liebert and Ashley Miller. Liebert, who played mostly the evening shows was very big with special effects i.e. bells and whistles; Ashley was fond of show tunes and Ray seemed to like bright marches and was the best at exit music. What a treat to hear them at the twin consoles at holiday time. The biggest problem was getting the audience to leave during the break music, as many stayed to applaud and then leave as the curtain rose on the film credits.

Simon L. Saltzman
Simon L. Saltzman commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 6, 2004 at 2:41 pm

Vito: Your description of the RCMH traveller closing and the contour descending was right on, but you should have noted that at the second that the sound track ended, the organ would pick up on the exact note so that there was no glaring change in key, after which the organist would segue into his medley. Even with the showing of “Executive Suite,” which had no sound track except for the peeling of a bell that began and ended the film, the organ picked this up before continuing. It should be noted that the Roxy was notoriously sloppy about this part of the presentation and the film would end with the curtain still halfway down exposing a blank screen.