RKO Albee Theatre

1 DeKalb Avenue,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

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Showing 101 - 106 of 106 comments

bobditt
bobditt on April 8, 2004 at 5:35 am

Too bad it couldn’t hold out longer,Brooklyn Heights is a prime location now.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on February 14, 2004 at 5:37 pm

The Albee was always considered one of the most important and beautiful theatres in Brooklyn. In its first years, it played two-a-day vaudeville exclusively, but finally had to give into the competition by adding a feature movie and shifting to continuous performances. Vaudeville was finally dropped in 1934-35 when it became economically unfeasible due to the Depression. As the RKO Albee, it was exclusive first-run for all of Brooklyn, getting the movies direct from their Broadway premiere engagements. However, due to the product “split” between three other downtown Brooklyn palaces— the Fox, Metropolitan, and Paramount— the Albee played mainly 20th Century-Fox and RKO releases. This meant, as it did with the other three theatres, that the double-feature programs usually had to be “held-over” for at least one extra week, which was not rewarding except in the cases of the biggest hit movies. Because of its size, the Albee suffered when the New York area switched to the “Premiere Showcase” type of saturation release and the theatre lost its exclusive status. Due to a simultaneous decline in downtown Brooklyn’s shopping district, the Albee’s demolition seemed inevitable as the community tried to save itself with new construction projects.

William
William on November 14, 2003 at 10:47 pm

The RKO Albee Theatre’s address was 1 DeKalb Ave..

Joanne
Joanne on January 25, 2003 at 2:21 am

A description of the theater as it was when opened is in the book “Mr. Bojangles”, by Haskins and Mitgang.

philipgoldberg
philipgoldberg on October 23, 2002 at 10:21 pm

the site is now home of the Galleria, a troubled multi-level shopping mall.

fmbeall
fmbeall on October 22, 2001 at 5:15 am

Theatre was in the beaux arts style. Architect Thomas Lamb. Opened January 25, 1925 and demolished in November 1978. Prime Brooklyn RKO house.