Sutton Theater

205 East 57th Street,
New York, NY 10022

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Showing 101 - 125 of 184 comments

Astyanax
Astyanax on August 26, 2005 at 4:41 pm

If I recall, “Going Places” was a Cinema 5 release and premiered at the Cinema II.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 25, 2005 at 7:01 pm

PaulLD1… The tag line “A sexual Keystonecomedy” belongs to a different advertisement (apparently cut off in the image) that was below the one for “Animal Crackers”. I “yahoo’d” the phrase and found it was a quote from Pauline Kael’s review of the movie “Going Places” — a French film of some controversy that was released here in 1974 concurrent with the Sutton engagement of the restored Marx Brothers classic. It starred Gerard Depardieu, Jeanne Morreau and Isabelle Huppert.

Couldn’t tell you the theaters in which “Going Places” was booked. I can tell you that during this time, my Mother worked for Rugoff Theaters and scored some passes for my Grandfather and I to see “Animal Crackers” during this run.

A couple of years later, I caught “Animal Crackers” on the big screen one last time at Century’s Green Acres Theater on a double bill with the bio-pic “W.C. Fields and Me” starring Rod Steiger and Valerie Perine.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 26, 2005 at 4:04 pm

From 1955: the little low-budget movie based on a TV play that went all the way to the top prize at the Academy Awards. I like the way the Sutton is mentioned in one of the critics' quotes.

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From Shaun Considine’s biography of Paddy Chayefsky, “Mad as Hell”:

In New York, the film continued to run for an unprecedented 39 weeks at one theatre only, the Sutton. “That was the first time that people from the suburbs ever went to a movie on the East Side,” said Bernie Kamber. “They’d come in on the subway from Queens or from the Bronx, get off at 59th Street, walk two blocks south, then stand on line for MARTY.”

PaulLD1
PaulLD1 on July 25, 2005 at 4:43 am

Re: the “Animal Crackers ad: Wow!!! I never knew that Marx Brothers movie was a "sexual Keystone comedy”!!!!

Astyanax
Astyanax on July 25, 2005 at 3:33 am

Another great ad is the Christmas 1964 NYTimes full page spread that Rugoff ran after the big brouhaha involving Billy Wilder’s Kiss Me Stupid. UA was scheduled to open the farce at Cinema 1 for the holidays but the wags at the time considered it too risque. The distributer got cold feet and pulled the film at the last minute. Rugoff than rushed Nothing But A Man into release, to fill in the gap.

As a clever PR move, Rugoff ran this full page ad with drawings of quaint Victorian holiday figures, each displaying the presentation at each of the circuit’s ten Manhattan theatres.

Kiss Me Stupid finally premiered in Jan. ‘65, and despite all the fuss is now rated PG13.

Does anyone have a copy of that ad?

CelluloidHero2
CelluloidHero2 on July 25, 2005 at 2:27 am

Rober R – That’s a great ad!

RobertR
RobertR on July 24, 2005 at 4:05 pm

“Thats Entertainment” started a revival craze and I remember this release of “Animal Crackers” did such huge business at the Sutton, it opened on a neighborhood run also. Check out the Suttons great marquee in the ad.
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CelluloidHero2
CelluloidHero2 on July 20, 2005 at 8:46 am

The Sutton was one of my favorite theatres. The audience always seemed to be filled with well informed fellow film lovers which made the experience even more enjoyable. Among the many films I saw there included are: The Sting, Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid, Joe Hill, The Immigrants, The New Land, Young Frankenstein, Blazzing Saddles, Silent Movie, A Countess From Hong Kong, Dealing, The Group, Animal Crackers, Raging Bull, Don’t Look Now, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Morgan and Little Big Man.

moviesmovies
moviesmovies on July 13, 2005 at 6:29 am

saw Roeg’s ‘Don’t Look Now’ here.

RobertR
RobertR on July 4, 2005 at 10:48 am

The Burtons day and dated the Sutton and Trans-Lux West.
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RobertR
RobertR on July 4, 2005 at 6:52 am

Here is the Sutton day and dating with the Criterion
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frankie
frankie on June 27, 2005 at 9:34 am

I too didn’t know that the Sutton had closed. Thank God I went to see “Broadway: The Golden Age” when it played there recently. One of my happiest memories was rushing with friends to the Sutton to see “Ed Wood.” All the movie buffs were there, so we had to wait till the later show. All the true believers enjoyed it together. Then it opened wide and bombed ! What do they know ? Thank you, Martin Landau ! frankie from Brooklyn

dave-bronx™
dave-bronx™ on April 13, 2005 at 9:27 am

Yup that’s it – The Gotham Cinema was owned by Crown Theatres, previously owned by Trans-Lux.

bazookadave
bazookadave on April 13, 2005 at 8:55 am

Check out the listing for the Crown Gotham…isn’t that the Gotham Cinema that was around the corner from the Sutton?

bazookadave
bazookadave on April 12, 2005 at 3:50 pm

THE GOTHAM!!!! HOLY CRIPES, yes that was definitely it. I remember waiting outside to see Towering Inferno. I know I saw something there in the 80s but I forgot what. Thanks for jogging my memory!
Dave B

bazookadave
bazookadave on April 12, 2005 at 3:25 pm

Hi Gerald!
I remember the Baronet/Coronet, they have just been replaced by a luxury tower on Third Avenue between 59th and 60th. The theater I recall was on Third Avenue between 57th and 58th, one block downtown from Alexander’s. I used to think it was connected on the inside to the Sutton around the corner but I don’t think it was.

I have been keeping a list of movies I have seen and the theaters I saw them in since 1986, I’ll check tonight and see if any of them have the name of that theater where I saw “Towering Inferno."
It has been driving me nuts for a while now that I can’t remember that theater!
Dave B

dave-bronx™
dave-bronx™ on April 12, 2005 at 3:23 pm

No, the theatre around the corner was the Gotham Cinema. Wendy’s is not where the Gotham was, it was next door, and it is part of the Sutton’s property. In the winter Wendy’s (although at that time it was Burger King) would call us in the theatre and ask for heat, and we would go in the cellar of the theatre and open a valve for the steam, when they had enough they would call to say so and we would turn it off.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on April 12, 2005 at 3:05 pm

Davebazooka,
The theatre directly around the corner on 3rd Ave. would have been the Coronet/Baronet or later Coronet 1 & 2.

BoxOfficeBill
BoxOfficeBill on April 12, 2005 at 2:23 pm

In the ‘50s, I saw there Alec Guinness in the wonderful “The Ladykillers” and “The Horse’s Mouth.” And I recall seeing there “Moby Dick” and “Suddenly Last Summer,” both of which had been day-dating at the Criterion. And I remember standing outside in line for “Gigi” through an entire sold-out showing after it had moved there from its reserved-seat booking at the Royale. On Sept. 25 '04 above, Warren listed four films that had played a total of 105 weeks in 1950-51. I believe that “Marty” played nearly a year there in 1955 on an exclusive run, no? After (or was it just before?) receiving its Academy Awards in March '56, “Marty” then moved to city-wide booking on the Loew’s circuit.

bazookadave
bazookadave on April 12, 2005 at 1:59 pm

Passed by on Third Avenue on Saturday April 9 and saw nothing but a gap between buildings where the Sutton used to stand. The last movie I saw there was “The Lion King” in 1994. Saw quite a few there in the decades before that. Definitely saw “The Bad News Bears” there around 1975. There used to be another movie house directly around the corner on Third Avenue but I do not remember its name. I do know I saw “The Towering Inferno” there. Now it’s a Wendy’s.

I also noted that all the windows on wall of the apartment building adjacent to where the Sutton was are freshly sealed with brick. I guess the original builders were hoping the Sutton would always be there and included windows that viewed out directly above the theater. Now with the new tower coming in they have to go! Major bummer. That’s skyrights and zoning for you. The windows can be seen unsealed in the photo of the Sutton at the top of this page.

hardbop
hardbop on April 5, 2005 at 4:08 pm

I walked by here on Saturday and it is indeed a hole in the ground. As I said above, I didn’t even know the Sutton had closed.

Gerald A. DeLuca
Gerald A. DeLuca on April 1, 2005 at 12:59 pm

Yep, true. This is just a cry of anguish, unrelated to the Sutton except in a general way: Boston now has only two commercial movie theatres. Providence has three. Boston-proper has no art houses left. None, zero. Providence has two. But then Providence doesn’t have a Cambridge.

hardbop
hardbop on April 1, 2005 at 11:53 am

Damn. It didn’t even know the Sutton had closed. Another one bites the dust.

iemola1
iemola1 on March 30, 2005 at 11:18 am

As I posted above, I’d pass the SUTTON every day for four years on my way to the High School of Art and Design, on the corner of Second Avenue and 57th Street. Whenever they changed films, I’d step into the lobby and pick up a new edition of SHOWCASE – THE MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR ART THEATERGOERS – so I’d like to fill in some of the blanks in the movie history of the Sutton from 1966 to 1971:

THE BLUE MAX – SEPTEMBER 1966
LOVES OF A BLONDE – NOVEMBER 1966
GAMBIT – JANUARY 1967
TOBRUK – FEBRUARY 1967
A COUNTESS FROM HONG KONG – APRIL 1967
THE JOKERS – MAY 1967
GAMES – OCTOBER 1967
CHAPPAQUA – NOVEMBER 1967
THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE – JANUARY 1968
CHARLIE BUBBLES – MARCH 1968
I’LL NEVER FORGET WHAT’S ‘IS NAME – MAY 1968
BOOM – JUNE 1968
A LOVELY WAY TO DIE – JULY 1968
ZITA – SEPTEMBER 1968
THE BOFORS GUN – OCTOBER 1968
SECRET CEREMONY – NOVEMBER 1968
THE FIXER – DECEMBER 1968
HELL IN THE PACIFIC – MARCH 1969
BEFORE WINTER COMES – APRIL 1969
THE LOVES OF ISADORA – MAY 1969
JOHN AND MARY – JANUARY 1970
and … I guess I went back the following year and saw
LITTLE BIG MAN – JANUARY 1971.

JKauf
JKauf on March 27, 2005 at 4:58 am

One day in 1972, I was walking up Third Avenue when I noticed something new in the neighborhood. On the corner of Third and 57th Street, there was a large display of red, white and blue balloons outside the office of a presidential candidate.

The window display labeled the corner storefront as the headquarters of Bill McKay. The candidate bore a suspicious resemblance to Robert Redford.

Inside, a pretty young girl handed me three balloons and some campaign literature. I helped myself to a slice of apple pie and a cup of coffee. Glancing at the campaign handout, I was puzzled by its lack of opinion. McKay seemed to be all image and little substance.

Leaving the “headquarters,” I glanced across the street to see what was playing at The Sutton. The marquee advertised The Candidate, starring Robert Redford. Suddenly, it all made sense.