Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cinema North 1-5 on Aug 9, 2014 at 10:22 pm

rivest266 is right. The Cinema North bears a striking resemblance to the Valley Circle Theatre in San Diego, California. It looks as though National General used the same plans, by Beverly Hills architect Harold Levitt, for both theaters. I recall seeing a photo of another almost identical theater (somewhere in Missouri, I think) but I can’t recall the name of it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Classic Theater on Aug 9, 2014 at 2:34 pm

A few drawings and plans for a theater at Dayton, Ohio, designed in 1926 for Carl P. Anderson are in the Pretzinger Architectural Collection at Wright State University. It must have been the Classic Theatre. The papers in this collection are mostly from the offices of the various firms Dayton architect Albert Pretzinger was involved with. In 1926, when the Classic Theatre was designed, he was a partner in the firm of Pretzinger & Musselman.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mayflower Arts Center on Aug 9, 2014 at 1:49 pm

Apparently the Mayflower Theatre’s organ was still in use at least as late as 1940, when the October 26 issue of The Piqua Daily Call made reference to “…Donald Wells, organist at the Mayflower theater….” Wells was visiting Delaware to attend a concert by French organist and composer Joseph Bonnet.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 9, 2014 at 12:24 pm

The opening of the Strand was noted in the November 6, 1915, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“Fred L. Adams has opened the Strand theater at Piqua, Ohio. This is a handsome new fireproof structure seating 500, and is equipped with all conveniences for the patrons. Mr. Adams was formerly the manager and proprietor of the Favorite theater in Piqua.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Miami Theatre on Aug 9, 2014 at 12:20 pm

The Piqua Daily Call was advertising this house as Schine’s Miami Theatre in 1933. In 1930 it was advertising as May’s Piqua Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 2:55 pm

The Strand in Rockland was in operation by 1920. The report of the Massachusetts District Police published January, 1920, listed the Strand Theatre, Rockland, in good condition. The licensee was named Lee A. Rhodenzier. The January 23, 1923, issue of The Film Daily had this item:

“The Manchester Amusement Co., a subsidiary [of New England Theaters] has sold the Strand, Rockland, Mass., to L. A. Rhodenizer, the theater’s former manager.”
Contracts had been let for construction of a small movie theater in Rockland in 1915, according to the May 29 issue of The American Contractor. The two-story building was only 34x56 feet, though, which would have been too small for the Strand’s 779 seats, but it might have been expanded later, so it could have been the Strand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wayne Cinemas on Aug 8, 2014 at 2:53 pm

If it burned in 1926, it’s possible that the Trainor Opera House had become the Strand Theatre which, according to the November 27, 1926, issue of The Piqua Daily Call had been completely destroyed by a fire the previous night, along with an adjacent building. The fire was caused by the explosion of film in the projector. The Opera House was built by the I.O.O.F. in 1873.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:10 pm

The Strand was on the northeast corner of Main and High Streets, according to the May 26, 1976, issue of The Piqua Daily Call

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:04 pm

The March 11, 1976, issue of The Piqua Daily Call said that demolition of the old Strand Theatre building was underway.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 12:17 pm

A July 22, 1935, article in The Piqua Daily Call says that the long-abandoned Strand Theatre building was to be remodeled into a bottling plant. The article places the three-story building on the east side of the public square with a frontage of 91 feet on North Main Street and a somewhat longer frontage on East High Street. I’ve been unable to determine if the building was on the northeast corner or the southeast corner. Both corners now feature parking lots, so the Strand has been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Piqua Cinema on Aug 8, 2014 at 11:53 am

This house opened on September 23, 1929, as the Ohio Theatre. An article in the August 29, 1970, issue of The Piqua Daily Call features an article about John Hixson, who says that he was one of the projectionists when the house opened.

The May 22, 1931, issue of the Call says that Schine’s Piqua Theatre, formerly the Ohio Theatre, would have its formal opening that night.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbia Music Arena on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:36 am

An item in the July 16, 1910, issue of The American Contractor attributes the design of this theater to the firm of Taylor & DeCamp. The partnership of Charles C. Taylor and Benjamin C. DeCamp was formed in 1909 and dissolved in 1912.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hollywood Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:08 am

Louis A. Livaudais died in 1932, so I don’t know if he had anything to do with designing this 1933 project, but apparently the firm’s name remained unchanged. Much earlier in their careers, Favrot & Livaudais had designed the Rapides Opera House in Alexandria, Louisiana, which house was later renamed the Paramount Theatre. Charles Allen Favrot’s son, Henri Mortimer Favrot, later became a partner in the firm of Favrot & Reed, who designed at least three theaters.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about White Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 12:42 am

Although it mistakenly calls the street Forest Boulevard, this item from the “New Theatre Projects” section of the September 23, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald is clearly about the White Theatre:

“DALLAS— M. S. White, 508 Largent. Will erect on Forest Boulevard theatre to cost, $40,000. Architect, W. Scott Dunne, Melba Building.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rio Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 12:32 am

This house was open before 1933, the year in which it was remodeled, according to this item form Motion Picture Herald of September 23:

“BEAUMONT— Rio Moving Picture Company. Contractor, Charles F. Law, Perlstein Building, Beaumont. Remodeling to cost $6,500. Architects, Babin & Neff, Perlstein Building.”
As the item doesn’t give the name of the theater itself, but only that of the company having it remodeled, it’s possible that it had previously operated under a different name.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Corlett Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 12:22 am

The “New Theatre Projects” section of the September 23, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald included this item datelined Cleveland:

“Corlett Theatre, Miles Avenue. To construct balcony in theatre and other improvements. Architect, J. L. Cameron, 10326 Ashbury.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about 68th Street Playhouse on Aug 7, 2014 at 10:30 pm

The building at this address was to be remodeled, according to this item in the September 23, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald. It sounds as though there was already a theater in it at that time, but if so the magazine didn’t give its name:

“Catherine O'Reilly of Great Neck, to alter building and motion picture theatre at 1164 Third Avenue, New York City. Cost $4,000. Architect, Eugene De Rosa, Inc., 105 West 40tb Street.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hollywood Theatre on Aug 7, 2014 at 9:44 pm

The Hollywood Theatre in Gretna was completely rebuilt in 1933 after the original house was destroyed by a fire. New Orleans architects Favrot & Livaudais designed the new theater, according to the September 23, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Benton Theatre on Aug 7, 2014 at 8:35 pm

Some of the news media reporting on the collapse of the Benton Theatre building earlier today might be checking Cinema Treasures for information, as a couple are using the 1931 opening date we give. It’s wrong, though. An advertisement by the Kansas City Real Estate Board in the August 22, 1926, issue of the Kansas City Star touted real property in the city as an investment, and said:

“[t]he Benton Theater building at Benton and Independence Boulevards was built in 1911 by C. O. Jones. Since then it has paid for itself twice over in rental revenue and was sold this year for three times the original cost.”
David and Noelle’s list of known Boller Brothers theater designs does list the Benton Theatre as a 1931 project for the firm, but that had to have been a remodeling job. The house was mentioned several times in the trade publications during the 1910s and 1920s. I haven’t been able to discover the original architect of the Benton Theatre. Noelle Soren’s research was sufficiently thorough that, had the 1911 Benton been designed by Carl Boller, it’s very likely that she would have discovered the fact.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Benton Theatre on Aug 7, 2014 at 7:52 pm

I don’t know when the Benton Theatre became a church, but it will be a church no longer after today. According to this post at northeastnews.net, the building partly collapsed this morning, and what is left will probably be demolished soon. A vacation bible school was in session at the time of the collapse, but all 44 children and 20 staff members escaped the disaster.

A city official said that the structure was not on the city’s dangerous buildings list, as Kansas City lacks the staff for random building inspections, and only investigates the condition of structures if and when complaints are filed.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about D & R Theatre on Aug 6, 2014 at 3:37 pm

An illustrated Two page article about the D&R Theatre in Aberdeen appeared in the June 29, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald. Plans for the recent remodeling were by architect Bjarne Moe.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Janes Theatre on Aug 6, 2014 at 3:22 pm

The Janes Theatre was designed by its original owner, Fred H. Witters, with some critical structural elements planned by the Saginaw architectural firm of Cowles & Mutscheller. A three-page article about the project, with several photos, appears in the June 29, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Adelphi Theater on Aug 6, 2014 at 3:03 pm

Chris: the earlier Adelphi Theatre is listed here as the Clark Theater.

An ad for Pittco Store Fronts (a division of Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.) in the June 29, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald featured photos of the Adelphi’s entrance before and after the remodeling designed by Mark D. Kalischer.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hamilton Movie Theater on Aug 6, 2014 at 2:43 pm

After acquiring the house from Smalley’s Theatres in 1934, the Schine circuit had this theater completely remodeled and renamed it the State Theatre. Two photos of the State illustrate this article in the June 1, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald. The plans for the project were by architect Peter M. Hulsken.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Astor Theatre on Aug 6, 2014 at 2:31 pm

Three photos of the Trans-Lux Theatre illustrate this article in the June 1, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald.