Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 126 - 150 of 9,852 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Beverly Theater on Feb 4, 2015 at 5:32 pm

Here is an undated interior photo of the Beverly Theatre’s auditorium, from the Peoria Historical Society.

Like Kerasotes' Varsity Theatre of 1939, the Beverly was designed by Peoria architect J. Fletcher Lankton. This web page has a history of Kerasotes Theatres.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Elmwood Theater on Feb 3, 2015 at 11:33 pm

The correct address for the Elmwood Theatre is 431 Harrison Street, as listed in the local telephone directory in 1916. Advertisements for the theater from the period gave its location as Harrison Street and Gunderson Avenue.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Orpheum Theatre on Feb 3, 2015 at 10:17 pm

Here is a ca. 1920 photo of the Orpheum Theatre. Click the name “Orpheum” in the title field just below the photo for links to additional photos of the house.

The July 16, 1910, issue of The American Contractor said that the theater under construction in Peoria, which would be leased to the Orpheum Theatre company, had been designed by the architectural firm of Hewitt & Emerson. Herbert Edmund Hewitt and Frank Nelson Emerson formed their partnership in 1909. At least nine of the firm’s buildings are now listed on the NRHP.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mainstreet Theatre on Feb 3, 2015 at 4:30 am

The Recent opening of the Mainstreet Theatre in Warrensburg, Missouri, was noted in the April 8, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald. The new house was owned by Dumond Christopher, and featured RCA high fidelity sound equipment.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Falls Cinema on Feb 3, 2015 at 4:08 am

A March 3, 2012, article in the Morris County Record said that the Lowell Theatre was opened in 1915, and was destroyed by a fire in January, 1933. The Falls Theatre was built on the same site, opening in June, 1933.

The April 8, 1933, issue of Motion Picture Herald said that a 750-seat theater was being built for the Lowell Theatre Company at Little Falls, Minnesota, to a replace their house that had been destroyed by a fire. Plans for the project were by Liebenberg & Kaplan.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Princess Theatre on Feb 2, 2015 at 5:06 am

The Princess Theatre was mentioned in the April 2, 1910, issue of The Billboard. I also found it in the October 7, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World, which said that the house had discontinued vaudeville and would begin a policy of feature films. The July 4, 1925, issue of MPW had this item:

E. S. Harris is remodeling the Princess at Peoria and adding a new organ and a complete projection room equipment. He will open the house about July 1 with a second-run policy.“
A 1914 photo of the original entrance of the Princess Theatre can be seen here.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Feb 2, 2015 at 4:14 am

The July 4, 1925, issue of The Moving Picture World noted the recent opening of the State Theatre:

“Morris Cuzzner, manager, opened the new State Theatre in South Manchester early in June. Vaudeville and pictures form the policy. The State cost $150,000 and it has a seating capacity of nearly 2,000.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Orpheum Theatre on Feb 1, 2015 at 11:56 pm

The undated photo of the Orpheum on this web pageprobably dates from around 1970. The history below the photo says that the house opened in 1930 in a building that had formerly housed an arcade. The house closed as the Orpheum in 1977. In 1980 it reopened as the Rosemary Theatre, and after another closure became an Asian movie theater called the Golden Dragon. It closed for the last time in 1987.

I’m not sure what to make of an item in the July 6, 1918, issue of The Moving Picture World that said that the new Orpheum Theatre at 604 Queen Street West in Toronto had opened the week of June 10. This might have been an earlier theater next door, or it’s possible that the Orpheum actually opened earlier than the author of the history thought, and the building was renumbered at some point.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Crystal Theatre on Feb 1, 2015 at 2:58 pm

The 1928 Motion Picture Times article about the dismantling of the Crystal Theatre has been moved again to this link.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ultravision Theatre on Jan 30, 2015 at 2:27 pm

The prototype UltraVison Theatre in Charleston, South Carolina, was developed by ABC-Paramount affiliate Wilby-Kincy and designed by architect William Bringhurst McGehee of the firm Six Associates. The Deerfield Beach UltraVision was based on McGehee’s original plans, as was Florida State Theatres first UltraVision house, the single screen Springs Theatre in Ocala, Florida, which was completed only a few months before the Deerfield Beach project.

A Boxoffice article about the Ocala project said that McGehee’s plans were adapted for Florida State Theatres by an architect named Bill Murphy, so it sems likely that he was also involved in the Deerfield Beach project. I haven’t been able to positively identify Murphy, but it’s possible that he was Bill Jackson Murphy, a founder of BMS Associates, a Columbus, Georgia, firm that, according to Murphy’s obituary designed numerous theaters for “…Martin Theaters, Fuqua, United Artists, Carmike Cinema and Southern Theaters….” in the southeast and Texas.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Meroney Theatre on Jan 30, 2015 at 4:48 am

According to the Meroney’s Theatre page at Doc South’s “Going To the Show,” the building housed a number of theaters over the years. The Meroney Theater building housed different theaters from 1904 to 1989.

“In 1907, the Bijou operated on the first floor of Meroney’s Theater as a movie and live-action theater. September 1909 saw the introduction of the Grand theater to the Meroney building, which was succeeded by the Grubb theater in 1911. The theater also operated under the names of The Colonial, The Strand, The State, Centre, The Towne Theatre, and Towne Twin Cinema (the theater’s name when it officially closed).”
The house returned to its original name on reopening as a live theater in 1995. Additional details about the various theaters can be found by using the drop-down menu of the “Chose a venue” box on the Salisbury page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victory Theatre on Jan 30, 2015 at 4:18 am

A 1915-1916 city directory of Salisbury lists 103 S. Main as the location of a house called the Main Theatre. Doc South’s “Going To the Show” says that the Main operated from 1913 to 1918. The house was rebuilt that year, doubling its capacity, and reopened as the Victory Theatre on November 28. Doc South’s pages on the Victory include a newspaper article about the opening and another about the theater’s American Fotoplayer.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Jan 30, 2015 at 3:58 am

A capsule history of Spencer here says that the Liberty Theatre opened in 1917. If that is corrent, then it was apparently rebuilt the following year. Doc South’s “Going To the Show” has a scan of an opening announcement for the Liberty Theatre from the November 20, 1918, issue of the Salisbury Evening Post

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capri Theatre on Jan 29, 2015 at 5:44 am

The Capri can’t have been at 610 Greensboro Avenue if it was next door to the Alston Building and across from the even-numbered Bama Theatre. It must have had an odd-numbered address. I can’t find an address for Alston Place, but the Lorch Diamond Center to the south of the theater’s location is at 611.

The Capri was probably at 607 S. Greensboro, which would mean it was originally the house called the Belveldere Theatre, found at that address on a master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin that was compiled by Thomas M. Shelby. Shelby lists the Belvedere as a 1923 project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tiger Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 5:24 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin compiled by Thomas M. Shelby lists the Tiger Theatre in Auburn as one of his projects. However, it is listed as a 1927 project, so perhaps Whilldin only designed some alterations the year after the house opened.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Birmingham Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 5:16 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin, compiled by Thomas M. Shelby, lists the Pantages Theatre as one of his projects from 1927. However, as B. Marcus Priteca pretty much had a lock on theater designs for Pantages, it’s most likely that he designed the 1927 remodeling and that Whilldin acted as supervising architect.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Famous Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 5:06 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin, compiled by Thomas M. Shelby, lists the Famous Theatre in Birmingham as a 1926-27 project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ensley Theatre on Jan 29, 2015 at 4:55 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin compiled by Thomas M. Shelby lists the Ensley Theatre as one of his projects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lincoln Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 11:51 pm

The Lincoln Theatre was definitely in operation by mid-1921. Construction began in 1920, but I haven’t been able to discover if it opened late that year or early in 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Olympia Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 11:22 pm

A July 1, 1916, article in The Moving Picture World reported on the Olympia Theatre and noted that it was the first theater ever designed by architect W. L. Mowll.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tide Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 4:29 pm

Here is a 1986 photo of The Pitcher Show from American Classic Images. The November 11, 1983, issue of The Tuscaloosa News said that the Tide I & II Theatre would reopen that night as The Pitcher Show (Google News.) As the Pitcher Show the house served beer, wine, and food along with the movies. Despite the change in format, the house was still being operated by Cobb Theatres.

The February 5, 1969, issue of the News had an ad for the Tide I & II saying that there would be an open house on Thursday night (February 6) and the gala opening of the theater would take place on Friday, February 7.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Brownwood Lyric Theatre on Jan 27, 2015 at 6:01 pm

The June 19, 1914, issue of The Daily Bulletin, Brownwood’s newspaper, said that J. M. Robb of Big Springs had taken a one-year lease on the Brownwood Theatre, and that his son Harrell Robb would become the manager of the house. The partnership of Pearman & Griffin had operated the theater since its opening in March. The article didn’t mention the name Lyric Theatre, so it probably got that name some time later, perhaps in 1918 when the 1958 Bulletin article LouisRugani cited in the first comment said that it had opened.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avon Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 3:21 pm

A December 17, 1921, article in Exhibitors Trade Review indicates that by that time the Avon Theatre was being operated by the Empsall family, who were owners of an eponymous department store in Watertown. The Empsalls had been interested in acquiring the three theaters operated at Watertown by Papayanakos Brothers, but the brothers sold their houses to the Robbins Amusement Company of Utica instead.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 3:13 pm

The December 17, 1921, issue of Exhibitors Trade Review said that the three houses in Watertown operated by Papayanakos Brothers had been sold to the Robbins Amusement company of Utica. Papayanakos Brothers had taken over operation of the Antique Theatre in 1911, four years after they took over the Wonderland, later renamed Palace, and six years before the built the Olympic Theatre. The Antique had been opened in 1908 by the Mullin Film Service. The Lyric, which Papayankos Brothers had taken over before 1911 and which they still operated in 1916, was not mentioned in the article, so must have closed by late 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 2:50 pm

The December 17, 1921, issue of Exhibitors Trade Review reported the sale of three houses operated at Watertown by Papayanakos Brothers to the Robbins Amusement Company of Utica. One of them was the Palace. Papayanakos Brothers had taken over this house in 1907,when it was called the Wonderland Theatre. It was renamed the Palace following a later remodeling (probably after 1916.) Robbins also took over the Olympic and Antique Theatres in Watertown as part of the same deal.