Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 126 - 150 of 10,664 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gaslight Theatre on Feb 27, 2016 at 5:10 am

Several photos of this house over the years can be seen on this page of the Downtown Enid History web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Esquire Theater, Enid, OK 1957 on Feb 27, 2016 at 5:03 am

This photo depicts the first Esquire Theatre, originally the Aztec, which was destroyed by a fire in 1969 and replaced by the second Esquire. This is its CT page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dream Theatre on Feb 25, 2016 at 4:18 pm

I believe that the third Dream Theatre was still open in 1966, when it was either gutted or destroyed by a fire. The 18 April issue of the Greencastle Daily Banner reported that the theater had been gutted by a fire that started about 5:00 PM the previous day, while The Terre Haute Star said that the theater had been destroyed and its marquee had fallen into the street after filling with water.

Page 109 of Indiana’s Ohio River Scenic Byway, by Leslie Townsend, has a photo of the Dream Theatre with the 1950 movie Comanche Territory advertised on the marquee (Google Books preview.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sioux Theatre on Feb 24, 2016 at 6:24 pm

This item from the May 24, 1919, issue of The Moving Picture World could have been about the house that later became the Sioux:

“Tom Hammond, of Anthon, Ia., has built a brand new theatre, equipped up to the minute in every respect with Power’s equipment, and will open at once.”
An F. C. Lyon, operating a house in Anthon called the Jewel Theatre was listed in the October 12, 1929, issue of Exhibitors Herald World. The January 11, 1936, issue of Motion Picture Herald published a letter from W. Anderson, operating the Sioux Theatre, Anthon, Iowa.

The 1914-1915 edition of The American Motion Picture Directory listed the Opera House at Anthon, Iowa, as a movie theater. Given how small Anthon was it’s likely that the Opera House closed when Tom Hammond’s new theater opened. It’s also likely that Anthon never supported two theaters at once, so unless something happened to its original building, it seems likely that the 1919 house was the theater that later operated as the Jewel and as the Sioux.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Star Theatre on Feb 24, 2016 at 6:23 pm

This item is from the September 10, 1947, issue of Variety:

“The Star, a 250-seater, Anthon, Ia., has been purchased by Walter D. Rasmussen, Council Bluffs, Ia., from Tom Sandberg, who opened the house in Feb., 1946.”
W. D. Rasmussen of the Star Theatre, Anthon, Iowa, was listed in the July 10, 1948, issue of Motion Picture Herald as having joined the magazine’s team of exhibitors who would contribute capsule movie reviews for the magazine’s “What the Picture Did for Me” feature. Several of his reviews appeared in the magazine later that year. Around the same time, the July 3 issue of Showmen’s Trade Review said that “W. D. Rassmussen has finished a new marquee on the Star, Anthon, Ia.”

The Star Theatre advertised in the 1953 yearbook of Climbing Hill High School in Moville, Iowa. The proprietor at that time was named Cy Schulte, and the theater boasted a “modern cry room.” A new CinemaScope installation at the Star was mentioned in the 1955 Anthon High School yearbook.

A list of theaters reopened during the first quarter of 1958 was published in the April 7 issue of Boxoffice that year, and Cy Schulte’s Star at Anthon was among them.

Though no theater name was given, a line from the April 16, 1962, issue of Boxoffice probably refers to the Star, which by that time was most likely the only movie house in this very small town: “Cherokee and Anthon, Iowa, were flooded but the theatres were safe.”

While it’s possible that the Star that Tom Sandberg opened in 1946 was an older theater reopened with a new name, the fact that it had a cry room suggests that it was either new construction or an extensive remodeling. Cry rooms were not unknown even as early as the 1920s, but they did not become common in small town theaters until the post-war period.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hippodrome Theatre on Feb 23, 2016 at 7:38 pm

A history of Little Falls says that “[i]n 1910 W. H. Linton operated the ‘Hippodrome Theatre’ in the I.O.O.F. Hall on William Street.”

A comment from 2011 on a “Topix” page about Little Falls mentions the Odd Fellows Hall having been across the street from the fire station. The fire station is on the ground floor of the City Hall at Main and William Streets, and across William Street is only a modern, but aging, retail building (which looks to be from the 1970s) and its parking lot, so the Hippodrome has been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Old Liberty Theater on Feb 23, 2016 at 6:23 pm

This item about a Ridgefield Theatre in Washington is from the June 14, 1919, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“Ridgfield Theatre Opens.

“Steve LeRouge held a grand opening for the Ridgfield Theatre, Wash., May 24. This is the fourth theatre on the LeRouge circuit and seats 300. W. A. Stone, of the Service Film Company, installed two new Motiographs in the theatre.”

I’ve come across references from the 1920s of a Steve Le Rouge who was manager of a camp at Battle Ground Lake, about 18 miles north of Vancouver, Washington, which is very near Ridgefield, so it’s probably the same Steve LeRouge who ran the theater. The Liberty’s building has a stair-step parapet, and the brick of the walls is imprecise, both of which are characteristic of buildings from the 1910s but not usually of those from 1946, so I have to wonder if perhaps Liberty was just a new name for the old theater that opened in 1919.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Franklin Theatre on Feb 23, 2016 at 5:31 pm

The Franklin Theatre was extensively remodeled in 1919, as noted in this item from the June 14 issue of The Moving Picture World:

“Franklin Will Be Improved.

“David Morris, of the Franklin Theatre, Third and Fitzwater streets, will make several improvements to his theatre during the summer months. One of the main features will be the remodeling of the front of the building and installing a new and handsome box-office. On the interior he will remove the balcony and increase his seating capacity and standing room space. Improved ventilation will be arranged for in addition to a new lighting system. When completed, the theatre will be one of the handsomest in the city.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Actors Guild Playhouse on Feb 23, 2016 at 5:08 pm

Here’s the article announcing the intention of the Smoot Amusement Company to build the Lincoln Theatre, from The Moving Picture World of June 7, 1919:

“Smoots Add Third Theatre to Chain in Parkersburg

“THE SMOOT AMUSEMENT COMPANY, now controlling the Camden and Auditorium Theatres in Parkersburg, West Virginia, will add another house to its string in the same city. The addition is the Lincoln, a new house which will go up on the corner of Market and Eighth streets on the site of the Sycamore Place.

“The owners of the Smoot Amusement Company are Fayette C. Smoot, Charles S. Smoot and Frank J. Hassett. The concern is one of the livest organizations not only in the city but also in the surrounding district. The Parkersburg News, in its story on the new theatre, says: ‘The News wishes to take this occasion to commend the promoters of this new enterprise for their go-ahead policy and their confidence in Parkersburg’s future. It takes nerve and resource to take such steps, and fortunately for Parkersburg these men are equipped with these qualities. They do things.’

“The new Lincoln will seat 1,000 and will cost $90,000. It will embrace every modern item in construction, decoration and equipment and will provide an artistic asset to the city. Fred W. Elliott of Columbus, Ohio, is the architect, while the contract for the structure has been awarded to R. L. Brown, a local builder.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gaylynn Theater on Feb 22, 2016 at 9:51 pm

According to the May 13, 1965, issue of The La Marque Times, the Sharpstown Theatre was scheduled to open on May 27.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Golden Tri Cinema on Feb 22, 2016 at 9:38 pm

Records of a court case involving Julius Gordon’s Jefferson Amusement Company in the 1950s said that the Port Theatre in Port Arthur opened on June 6, 1940. It was most likely designed by Leon C. Kyburz, as at this time he was working as Jefferson’s in-house architect, designing all their projects.

Judging from Google street view the entire block of Ninth Avenue on which the theater was located has been redeveloped with a modern project. The theater has been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lynn Theater on Feb 22, 2016 at 9:19 pm

This web page has a photo of the steel framework of the Lynn Theatre under construction, dated 1939. The text also notes that the house was designed by architect L. C. Kyburz.

Two more construction photos can be seen here, and here. The Lynn was built for East Texas Theatres, a subsidiary of the Jefferson Amusement Company, 50% of which was in turn owned by Paramount Pictures. L. C. Kyburz was for many years Jefferson’s in-house architect.

An oral history from long-time Lufkin resident Bettie Kennedy says that the Lynn Theatre was located in the 100 block of what is now called Frank Avenue, across the street from the older Texan Theatre. The Texan’s building is still standing, but the Lynn was demolished to make way for a jail.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Texan Theater on Feb 22, 2016 at 9:12 pm

The Texan Theatre building appears to be still standing on Frank Avenue, its front covered in weathered, vertical wood siding of the sort that was fashionable for a while in the 1970s. Across the street from the Texas building is a jail, and a mural on the wall facing the street includes a view of the Texas Theatre as it once looked. The jail itself is built partly on the site of another Lufkin movie house, the Lynn Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Windsor Cinerama Theater on Feb 22, 2016 at 8:38 pm

A history of Marek Brothers, one of the construction companies that worked on the Windsor Theatre, notes that the house was designed by Beaumont, Texas architect L. C. Kyburz. Kyburz had been designing theaters for the Jefferson Amusement Company since at least the late 1930s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bengal Theatre on Feb 22, 2016 at 8:28 pm

The December 23, 1940, issue of The Orange Leader said that the Bengal Theatre would open on Christmas Day. The Bengal was operated by Julius Gordon’s Jefferson Amusement Company, which also operated the Strand and the Gem. According to a lawsuit in 1952, Jefferson had taken over the house in 1937 when it was called the American Theatre. The remodeling project had been designed by L. C. Kyburz, Jefferson’s in-house architect.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Feb 22, 2016 at 8:11 pm

Julius Gordon’s Jefferson Amusement Company (50% of which was owned by Paramount Pictures through their subsidiary the Saenger Amusement company) had the Strand Theatre extensively remodeled in 1942, as was noted in a special section of the May 12 issue of The Orange Leader (online here.) The reopening was to take place on May 13. The architect for the project was L. C. Kyburz.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about New Club Theatre on Feb 22, 2016 at 6:34 pm

Here are a couple of relevant posts (with illustrations) from the web site Historic Joplin:

The New Club Theater

The Club Theater

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Leal Theatre on Feb 21, 2016 at 9:28 pm

RangerRobert: The address of the upstairs is 3909 Washington, and it still contains office suites. Google the address to see listings for some of the tenants.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Feb 21, 2016 at 8:08 pm

A notice that J. A. Getchell and B. F. Elbert had leased the Bijou Theatre, a vaudeville house, from Fred Buchanan and would remodel and reopen it as a movie house called the Nickeldom appeared in the May 1, 1906, issue of The Des Moines Register.

A reminiscence by Mr. Adrian D. Sharpe in the September-October issue of Bandwagon, the journal of the Circus Historical Society, recalls that in Des Moines, in October, 1905, he met “…Mr. Buchanan, who operated the Bijou Theatre, a small store room picture house playing some vaudeville….”

The Lost Cinemas of Greater Des Moines web site (kencmcintyre’s link of July 9, 2007) says that the house was renamed the Unique Theatre in 1908.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Point Theatre on Feb 21, 2016 at 1:46 am

A while back an E-bay seller offered a postcard that was an invitation to the Whitney Point High School Alumni Banquet, held at the Opera House on June 23, 1905. I don’t know when the building that later housed the Point Theatre was built, but if it was the same one that was there in 1905 then, to accommodate banquets, the Opera House must have been one of those multi-purpose halls with a flat floor. It might later have been remodeled with a raked floor when it became a full-time movie house.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theater on Feb 19, 2016 at 1:28 pm

Palm Theatre was an earlier name for the Rialto itself. The Palm was listed at 405 E. Erie Street in The American Motion Picture Directory published in 1915. The Palm opened on February 6, 1911, according to the February 10 issue of The Des Moines Register.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cinema Theater on Feb 19, 2016 at 12:34 pm

kencmcintyre’s link is dead, and I don’t recall what was on it, but it might have been to this page of the City of Urbana’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gloria Theatre on Feb 19, 2016 at 12:02 pm

GrandWorks Foundation has brought the name Gloria Theatre back to this house. A renovation project is ongoing. The venue is to be operated as a “…multi-purpose entertainment, business and community center….” Here is their web site.

The December 23, 1968, issue of Boxoffice has a brief notice about the two-screen Urbana Cinema, slated to be opened by Chakeres Theatres on Christmas Day. The opening would also mark the 27th anniversary of the opening of the house as the Gloria Theatre, on Christmas Day 1941.

An earlier Boxoffice item, from July 11, 1966, said that Chakeres Theatres had bought the Gloria, which the chain had operated under a lease for the previous twenty-five years, from Warren Grimes.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Feb 17, 2016 at 8:13 pm

The Improvement Bulletin of September 12, 1903, said that T. R. North was having plans prepared for an opera house at Adel, Iowa, by the Des Moines architectural firm of Liebbe, Nourse & Rasmussen.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Time Theatre on Feb 17, 2016 at 8:05 pm

The Time Theatre is also listed in the 1956 FDY. It apparently opened around 1946. The house was to be remodeled and CinemaScope equipment installed, according to an item in the June 18, 1955, issue of Boxoffice.