Glenwood Theatre

9100 Metcalf Avenue,
Overland Park, KS 66212

Unfavorite 9 people favorited this theater

Showing 1 - 25 of 49 comments

kdrake1007
kdrake1007 on February 28, 2014 at 3:25 pm

I worked at Glenwood Theater from February 1977 to October 1977. I started in the concession stand and moved to ticket sales sometime after the Star Wars opening. I remember Star Wars there fondly. We had a Kansas City premier for the movie the night before it opened nationwide. Several employees dressed as characters from the movie, an usher as Chewbacca and the head cashier as Princess Leia. I dressed in a formal and handed out roses to all of the ladies attending. Smitty was the projectionist at the time and we all swore he lived in the projection booth – he had a bed and bathroom there and we rarely saw him leave. Every night after the last show had started, we would total the ticket receipts and then call in our total sales to each distributor. The lobby design was not meant for sell-out shows. As the crowds would build, the lobby would fill and completely surround the concession stand and ticket booth, both round, and once you had served everyone closest to you, there wasn’t much to do until they started seating for that show. The manager was named Pat, don’t recall his last name, and the assistant manager had been an owner or manager for one of the drive-ins, Shawnee Drive-In perhaps. Great memories! Loved that theater and was very sad to see it go!

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on June 20, 2011 at 9:51 pm

Here is a fresh link to the first page of the March 20, 1967, Boxoffice article about the Glenwood Theatre. The article continues on the magazine’s next page.

dalemonaghen
dalemonaghen on June 20, 2011 at 7:58 pm

The Glenwood was demolished but the marquee was saved and moved a short distance to just east of 95th and Metcalf Ave. It is being used for the new Glenwood Arts Theatre located inside Metcalf South Shopping Center.

Cobalt
Cobalt on March 4, 2011 at 9:20 am

Anyone remember if PATTON played here in original run?

KingBiscuits
KingBiscuits on July 28, 2010 at 2:42 am

The thief was caught the next morning and the print was returned to the theatre.

andysummers
andysummers on July 27, 2010 at 9:44 pm

I’m wondering about the stolen “Return of the Jedi” 70mm prin. Is this still an ongoing investigation?

Now was the pyrite version of “Return of the Jedi” scored from the stolen 70mm print or 35mm?

The only way to tell is to look at any still existing VHS/Beta tape and look for que dots.

(Circularly) for 70mm
(Oval shaped) for 35mm prints

Que dots appear around every 15 to 20 minutes depending on each reel length.

Also any privately brought new/second hand 70mm projects in the past 10 years leading up to the theft at gunpoint in 1983, or any stolen 70mm projectors for this persons needs to make dodgy pyrite copies.

Chances are the print today would be so far, gone faded colour magnetic stripe would be fragile if not flaked away by now, due to poor storage.

Was there also a similar case in the UK of stolen “Return of the Jedi” print as I remember reading on huge poster at video library around 1983, and the theft in the US wouldn’t concern the UK.

So was the simultaneous coordinated theft by two parties working on different sides?

I’m, sure the FBI would like to catch these people? Maybe they are STAR WARS nuts or just pair of serious pyrites that wouldn’t care about shooting someone.

klebrun
klebrun on May 22, 2010 at 6:20 pm

Excellent find, Joe. Thank you!!!

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on May 22, 2010 at 1:35 pm

Two interior photos of the Glenwood illustrate this article in Boxoffice of March 20, 1967. Richard Wells of William Behrman and Associates engineered the building and designed the exterior of the Glenwood, but the interior was designed by architect Mel Glatz.

Antiquarius
Antiquarius on February 8, 2010 at 3:50 pm

I saw Cloak and Dagger here in 1984 or 1985. I only saw this one movie here, but I drove past the theatre many, many times, as my stepmother’s folks lived just a short distance north of the building. It was a very eye-catching mid-century building. Sorry that another strip mall in Overland Park was more important than a unique theatre like this one was.

klebrun
klebrun on August 5, 2009 at 2:34 am

Thanks for the link, Chuck. As you stated, the picture dates back to 1984, shortly after screens 3 and 4 were added to the north side of the building in 1983.

klebrun
klebrun on August 5, 2009 at 2:31 am

Thank you for the additional info Michael. I had almost forgotten how long that movie played. That would be unheard of now.

Coate
Coate on May 8, 2009 at 1:06 pm

Here’s some information to clarify the boxoffice performance of “Star Wars” at the Glenwood. Industry trade VARIETY in their July 21, 1978 issue listed the markets where “Star Wars” grossed more than $1 million. Kansas City came in 18th place with a gross of nearly $1.3 million. The top gross was at New York City’s Astor Plaza where it topped $3 million.

$3,291,362…New York (Astor Plaza)…59 weeks
$2,499,049…Denver (Cooper + Continental m/o)…54 weeks
$2,490,955…San Diego (Valley Circle)…56 weeks
$2,414,972…Los Angeles (Chinese)…51 weeks
$2,335,941…San Francisco (Coronet)…29 weeks
$2,171,394…Seattle (Cinema 150)…59 weeks
$2,153,790…Phoenix (Cine Capri)…59 weeks
$1,833,710…San Jose (Century 22)…59 weeks
$1,826,060…Dallas (Northpark)…53 weeks
$1,651,372…Portland (Westgate)…59 weeks
$1,608,402…New York (Orpheum)…28 weeks
$1,542,802…Newport Beach (Newport)…53 weeks
$1,344,879…Los Angeles (Century Plaza)…53 weeks
$1,343,736…Sacramento (Century 25)…59 weeks
$1,336,450…Los Angeles (Avco)…23 weeks
$1,310,251…Washington, DC (Uptown)…54 weeks
$1,282,621…Houston (Galleria)…59 weeks
$1,279,771…Kansas City (Glenwood)…55 weeks
$1,253,062…Salt Lake City (Centre)…54 weeks
$1,205,123…Honolulu (Cinerama)…57 weeks
$1,166,741…Boston (Charles)…45 weeks
$1,140,014…Cincinnati (Showcase)…58 weeks
$1,102,741…Louisville (Showcase)…59 weeks
$1,070,998…Dayton (Dayton Mall)…59 weeks

Coate
Coate on May 2, 2009 at 1:25 pm

The claim from a few posts back that the Glenwood had a Kansas City area exclusive for the original “Star Wars” is only partially correct. The fact is the Glenwood played the movie exclusively for only its first ten weeks. Beginning the film’s eleventh week, a second booking was added at the Antioch.

In terms of comparing the Kansas City gross with that of New York City, keep in mind that during the second half of the Glenwood’s 56-week run of “Star Wars,” it played in the smaller #2 auditorium.

JoelWeide
JoelWeide on September 20, 2008 at 8:44 am

The theatre in the Metcalf shopping center was originally an NGC theatre and then became a Mann house it was twinned by the Mann Group. If I remember right it was called the Metcalf South.

The curved screen in the Glenwood was the number 1 or original auditoriam and was approximately 90 foot wide, an awesome experience.

luvmtains777
luvmtains777 on September 20, 2008 at 12:31 am

Just so no one forgets there was a single screen theater in the Metcalf shopping mall up until around 1979. I think it was called the Metcalf Theater. It might have been a Mann Theater and while it was decent sized it was not near as big or nice as the Glenwood.

luvmtains777
luvmtains777 on September 20, 2008 at 12:24 am

The reason the Glenwood did so well with Star Wars was that it held exclusive rights to that movie for the entire Kansas City area. Thus, it sold out nearly every show for many months. I doubt any NY theater would be granted an exclusive but I would'nt be surprised if a NY theater outgrossed the Glenwood.

I think we called him Smitty, but the projectionist around the time of Star Wars was an older man that had been there many years when star wars came around. God bless him for allowing employees to once in awhile sit in the theater when he screened new movies around midnight.

Few may remember but the larger theater at the Glenwood had a slightly curved screen.

KingBiscuits
KingBiscuits on August 5, 2008 at 1:16 am

I went to the Glenwood Arts recently and it was a great arthouse with some of the above mentioned Glenwood memories (the auditorium entrances were decorated with lobby cards and posters of old Glenwood engagements). I saw Young@Heart at the theatre and the auditorium I was in (Auditorium 1) also had an original one-sheet of the Star Wars “circus” poster.

I never went to the Glenwood but the Glenwood Arts was the next best thing.

Aparofan
Aparofan on May 22, 2008 at 9:23 am

Here’s the KC Star ad for Star Wars' opening on 5/26/77.

View link

Aparofan
Aparofan on May 22, 2008 at 9:22 am

I forgot to post this scan of a piece of the carpet my buddy and I ripped out after the last movie I saw there in 2000. I feel it’s a one little piece of my favorite theater. I also have a piece of rock from one of the rock gardens by screen #2. Sure it’s vandalism but we didn’t care.

View link

Aparofan
Aparofan on May 22, 2008 at 7:14 am

And here are some stubs from Superman The Movie which played at the Glenwood in December 1978.

View link

Aparofan
Aparofan on May 22, 2008 at 6:50 am

Here’s a scan of a bunch of Glenwood ticket stubs from Star Wars in 1977. They were stapled in a book I bought a few years ago.

View link

Aparofan
Aparofan on August 11, 2007 at 3:37 pm

Here are a couple of ads for the Glenwood Manor motel complex, of which the theatre was part of when it first opened.

View link

View link

beaumon
beaumon on June 16, 2007 at 10:45 pm

Reading Lost Memory’s post is the first thing that makes me glad this theatre got torn down. Putting stadium seating in that big auditorium would have been sacriledge and totally destroyed all the charm that auditorium had. Let’s face it, the Glenwood was killed by the fact that it was setting on an insanely valuable piece of property. Maybe the Fine Arts Group could have done something with it had they ben around then, but even with their skill at rehabbing old theatres they couldn’t have got around the fact that the Glenwood was sitting on frontage property at 91st and Metcalf.

The last manager of the Glenwood told me that Overland Park refused to grant Goodrich any further building permits and essentially forced them to sell. Overland Park wanted the $$$ a different business would generate.

Aparofan
Aparofan on June 13, 2007 at 9:32 am

I was also a huge Glenwood fan. I saw Star Wars there the night it opened in 1977 and it was one of the greatest experiences of my life. I was seven at the time and had never seen a movie in such grand surroundings. I became a fairly frequent visitor there in the early ‘90’s and it was still a great moviegoing experience. Granted, the place wasn’t maintained as well as in its glory days but it was still a very nice theater with great sound. My friends and I went there the last weekend it was open and I cut out a small piece of the carpet as a souvenier of my favorite theater. I posted some more thoughts on the theater on my friend’s blog in honor of Star Wars’ 30th Anniversary.

View link

It’s a real shame there aren’t any theaters like the Glenwood in Kansas City anymore.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on March 2, 2007 at 3:08 pm

This is a 6/16/1999 article about this theater.

“New Owners Plan Expansion of Overland Park, Kan., Theater.

Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News
Author: Cooper, Brad

The new owner of the Glenwood 4 Theatres in Overland Park is planning an expansion that could mean as many as six new screens in an attempt to improve the profitability of the 30-year-old landmark.

Goodrich Quality Theatres Inc., which bought the Glenwood from Dickinson Theatres in January, has asked Overland Park to approve a 7,800-square-foot expansion for the complex at the corner of Metcalf Avenue and 91st Street.

Overland Park approved a plan in January 1998 that would have allowed a developer to demolish the theater and replace it with a strip mall.

But the project never came about, and Dickinson eventually sold the Glenwood to Goodrich, of Grand Rapids, Mich.

In the latest proposed expansion, Glenwood’s two smallest theaters would be demolished to make room for new screens, city officials said.

The theater’s two largest screens, including the one thought to be the biggest in the Kansas City area, would be left intact.

Architects, however, have asked Overland Park to delay action on their proposed expansion until August while they work on revisions.

“Originally we were looking at making it a 10-plex, and now we’re looking at an eight-plex or so,” said Goodrich spokesman Matt Johnson.

City planners say there is enough parking at the complex to accommodate the expansion.

The Glenwood expansion comes amid another flurry of movie theater expansion in the Kansas City area, including complexes in Merriam and the Country Club Plaza.

Johnson said the company had already put a lot of work into improving the Glenwood. For example, Glenwood’s largest screen has been increased in size.

At one time, the screen was 33 feet high by 66 feet wide. Johnson said his company increased the width 15 feet and increased the height 5 feet.

Johnson said new projectors had been installed to brighten the picture in Glenwood’s largest theater. He also said a new sound system was added to accommodate the latest “Star Wars” movie. Eventually, Johnson said, the company plans to add stadium seating.

Currently, the four Glenwood theaters seat 2,079 persons combined. The plans filed with the city call for the same number of seats in the theater, but spread out over more screens.

Johnson said that could be accomplished by adding stadium seating to two of Glenwood’s existing theaters. Stadium seating, he said, consumes more space, thereby allowing the number of seats to be reduced in the larger theaters.

Johnson said the expansion was intended to make the Glenwood, once one of the area’s most glamorous theaters, more viable and competitive with other area multiscreen complexes.

In recent years, Glenwood’s ticket sales have gradually declined. In 1990, the theater recorded gross ticket sales of about $2.2 million. By 1997, gross ticket sales had sagged to about $1.1 million.

“In the modern film distribution system, you really need to have at least six to eight theaters in a building to be viable,” Johnson said.

“When you’re in a fourplex situation (like the Glenwood), you’d better have a hot movie or you’re going to start hurting very fast,” Johnson said. “To survive the ups and downs of the popularity of films, you just need to have a bigger base”.