Capitol Theatre

890 Rue Sainte Catherine O,
Montreal, QC

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DavidDymond
DavidDymond on June 20, 2013 at 1:15 pm

N. L. Nathanson was the PRESIDENT and co-founder of Famous Players Canadian Corporation. Thomas Lamb architect did NOT have a Toronto office. I believe he worked out of New York. The Capitol Theatre in Montreal was a movie palace in every way.

MJP
MJP on June 19, 2013 at 5:19 am

Actually Wami that would be the old Loews Theatre where the Mansfield Club is used today.

Wami
Wami on June 18, 2013 at 10:10 pm

Today I was a tourist in my own town. The old Capitol Theatre was not completely demolished as I found out on a tour of the Mansfield Club. I worked for the caterer who closed the theatre with a huge party and auction of artifacts. Much to my surprise health buffs can pump iron or ride their bicycles in front of the old stage and backdrop in all of its glory!

CSWalczak
CSWalczak on January 26, 2012 at 12:49 pm

A link to a picture of the theatre’s interior

http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/en/collection/artifacts/MP-1980.390.9/

ohserase
ohserase on January 26, 2012 at 12:22 pm

It is too bad this grand cinema was torn down. I read that people tried to save it, but Mayor Jean Drapeau only cared about buildings in Old Montreal. Would be amazing if it was still in operation today. I was 10 months old when it was torn down, so I never went!

DonLewis
DonLewis on November 7, 2009 at 7:00 am

From the early 1970s, a postcard view of the Capitol Theater in Montreal.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on May 26, 2007 at 11:00 am

Opening day advert:
View link
A 1930’s postcard view of Rue Sainte Catherine:
View link
A similar view on this postcard from the 1960’s:
View link

edward
edward on October 17, 2003 at 12:49 pm

Designed by Thomas Lamb’s Toronto office, built by Nathan Louis Nathanson (first general manager of Famous Players Canadian Corp.) and opened April 2, 1921 with the film “Forbidden Fruit”. Although still in original condition and showing films, the theatre was demolished on October 1973 along with the Strand-built 1912 (renamed Pigalle and seen on the right of the photo above) just a few doors away.