Vogue Theatre

3810 N. Broadway,
Chicago, IL 60613

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VOGUE (nee CHATEAU) Theatre; Chicago, Illinois.

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The Chateau Theatre, located in the Lake View neighborhood on Broadway near Halsted and Grace Streets, was designed by August C. Willmanns and operated by Albert Fuchs for the Ascher Brothers circuit. The building is shown in a rendering and described as “exceedingly attractive”, which I would agree with. It was in a gabled medieval chateau style. It also was said to include offices, a ballroom, 22 lanes of bowling, and 22 billiards tables, in addition to a garage, and the adjacent hotel. (Chicago Tribune, August 8, 1915).

In 1926, the Aschers' lease was to run out and it was announced that it would go burlesque. In 1930 Essaness acquired it and announced it would be remodeled lobby to screen and recieve a new vertical. It was renamed the Vogue Theatre at this time. It burned in 1958, and was operating until then. The building was demolished a few years later.

Contributed by Brian Wolf, Bryan Krefft

Recent comments (view all 23 comments)

SPearce
SPearce on January 29, 2008 at 9:05 pm

CORRECTION to the above comment about how to access the projection booth at the Vogue. It seems there was a stairwell on the right side of the foyer in front of the entry doors at the right end that led up to the booth. The steps ran up along the wall that turned right to become the corridor. I think there was some sort of stairwell or door that led up to the ballroom on the left side of the concession stand though. Best remembrance.

richardg
richardg on March 15, 2008 at 5:43 pm

Many thanks for sharing your neighborhood memories. I can email you an old photo of the Chateau if you’d like. If you’re interested, please indicate on this site and I’ll post my email address so you can forward yours

SPearce
SPearce on March 15, 2008 at 9:31 pm

Richard G. – I would like that. Thank you.

richardg
richardg on April 16, 2008 at 6:33 pm

Sorry for my delay —wasn’t notified someone replied to my comment.
You can forward your email address to Please allow a few weeks before I email you the picture. Please subject your email as Chateau picture.

SPearce
SPearce on April 16, 2008 at 10:10 pm

Richard G. Thank you; not a problem. I will do that.

SPearce
SPearce on May 7, 2008 at 10:07 pm

I visited the neighborhood a week ago and was sad to see the Chateau block on the west side pretty much broken apart, especially where the Vogue Theater was located. I made an error earlier describing the cross street at the north end of the block as Irving Park Rd. It clearly is Sheridan Rd., and the shop fronts I remembered there have been replaced by an open space children’s park. If the facades were pulled off the east side of Broadway on the Chateau block, there still might be something underneath those structures to restore some original architectural ambience to the block, it would seem.

DavidZornig
DavidZornig on December 6, 2008 at 12:12 pm

There was a bowling alley at 828 W. Grace called Marigold Bowl until just a few years ago. It was operated by the same family for years. Particularly an older gentleman named Howard who worked both the desk & the shoe rental. He’d run from one to the other like Mr. Drucker on “Green Acres”,(General store to Postmaster).
This would have been across the street from the Marigold Arena, which is now and has been a church since at least the `70’s. A 24 hour IHOP stands guard at Broadway & Grace.

Howard talked about the Vogue Theatre and it’s proximity to the Marigold. As if it was a small town unto itself. Obviously he knew more than he led on. I wish he and it was still there, cause he surely knew of any tunnels.
Marigold was sold, torn down & replaced by a massive condo structure.

Part of what I believe was the Vogue Theatre site is the tall subsidized housing building at 810 W. Grace, whose East elevation faces Broadway. It had a fire of it’s own not too long ago. The Chateau Hotel was still at the other end last I was over there.

We bowled off & on in leagues at Marigold from 1995-2002. Never getting any better really.

The Baliwick Theatre is across from the Vogue site on Broadway. Several levels of live stage facilities that I think were built out of an old garage of some sorts. The rear stairwells were large and industrial looking. Moved some stuff in & out of there in 1990. It too had ballroom dancing even then.

SPearce
SPearce on December 6, 2008 at 11:09 pm

My theory is if political thinking takes America back to considering WPA endeavors that neighborhoods that lost their sense of design with overlays of modernism where it didn’t fit might have a reintroduction of a sense of continuity in style by building owners allowing artisans and artists to reintroduce some continuity with the past. The streets nearby, i.e., Fremont, have been gentrified so nicely; it would be lovely to see something done with Broadway between Grace and Sheridan Rd., and even that monstrous building on Grace. Some areas along Broadway are so nice and Chicago certainly has more than its share of creative artists and artisans; that would be a nice starting point.

LouisRugani
LouisRugani on March 30, 2010 at 4:31 pm

(Tuesday, July 11, 1961)
Welterweight Fight Held In Abandoned Theater in Chicago
CHICAGO: The fight game and the movie house – a couple of businesses which have been declining since the advent of television â€" got together Monday night and came up with a successful showing.
Using the facilities of the recently shut-down Vogue Theater, promoter Joe Kellman’s boxing card, featuring former welterweight champion Virgil Akins, drew a paid crowd of 1,003 with a net gate of $2,750.
Before the show started an accordionist played old favorites in the plush-carpeted lobby. Of course, the candy counter was open and the popcorn machine was popping away.
Inside the air-conditioned theater, the carpeting was taken up because no-smoking rules don’t mean a thing to most fight fans. The ring was set on the stage and to the left and right of the ring were several rows of choice seats. The house was scaled at $5, $3 and $2. The balcony proved the most popular spot because roost of the seats were $2.
The ring announcer needed no microphone. The acoustics were tops. Next to each fighter’s stool was a funnel-like contraption for spitting. It resembled a waterflushed cuspidor found next to a dental chair.
Oh, yes, the fight. It wasn’t much. Cecil Shorts, a 22-year-old from Cleveland, was decked in the eighth by Akins, the veteran At 67 was Jerry Thomas, 29, from St. Louis.
Will promoter Kellman have another show July 24 as scheduled? –“We’ll have to count the popcorn receipts and then decide,” he laughed.

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