Roxie Theatre

518 S. Broadway,
Los Angeles, CA 90013

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Showing 1 - 25 of 48 comments

drb
drb on January 15, 2012 at 3:54 am

The Roxie, or at least a good shot of its terazzo and a few glimpses of the marquee, is seen in “The Muppets” (the 2011 movie), as seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WWWTW1P8rQ

vokoban
vokoban on January 14, 2012 at 12:00 am

Here are a few photos I took today of the Roxie: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vokoban/6693424923/in/photostream http://www.flickr.com/photos/vokoban/6693425389/in/photostream/

socal09
socal09 on June 8, 2011 at 2:16 pm

The Roxie looks pretty sad these days especially now that some moron went and graffitied over the Roxie letters on the tower above the theatre. I’m not sure what you do with all these old cinemas on Broadway now that everyone stays home with VOD and Netflix.

BillCounter
BillCounter on March 8, 2011 at 12:41 pm

A great 30s view with the Roxie marquee still using milk glass letters:
View link

It’s in post #9 on a Jalopy Journal Forum:
View link

Anyone have any idea what archive this photo comes from? I can’t make out the title on the marquee but it appears it’s something with Kay Francis.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on April 19, 2010 at 10:43 pm

Here is the Roxie looking better than usual:
http://tinyurl.com/y5re637

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on May 14, 2009 at 12:49 am

Here is an August 1974 ad from the LA Times:
http://tinyurl.com/pepvd4

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on May 7, 2009 at 9:51 am

Those are pretty neat. The box office being dropped in the middle of the orchestra section is a unique touch:

View link

DONKIM
DONKIM on May 7, 2009 at 9:30 am

A couple curent interior photos of this theatre can be seen at flickr.com.
Just type in Roxie Theatre, Los Angeles.
Go to page 3 and scroll down and click on the second picture for a shot on the main auditorium with a partial view of the left side of the proscenium and screen.
Click on the first small picture on the right to see a nice side wall view of the Roxie auditorium.
These are the first current color interior photos that I have seen of the Roxie.

BhillH20
BhillH20 on April 22, 2009 at 3:40 pm

The exterior of this theater has not changed much in the last 45 years yet there is 22 views of the same exterior! Just wondering why…

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on February 4, 2009 at 7:01 pm

Here is the Roxie sizzling in the February heat of Los Angeles:
http://tinyurl.com/cjblpc

monika
monika on July 29, 2008 at 12:15 pm

I posted a diptych of the Roxie and the Palace on my Flickr page:
View link

Yves Marchand
Yves Marchand on June 22, 2008 at 7:40 am

Vokoban, I had permission from the owner to take a look at the auditorium by the support of the LA Conservancy.
I’ll send you the contact info by email.

vokoban
vokoban on June 21, 2008 at 7:52 am

Yves, did the owner show any interest in opening the theater at some point? Did they allow you to take any photos? I’d love to see the inside of the theater.

Yves Marchand
Yves Marchand on June 21, 2008 at 12:37 am

We’ve been inside the auditorium last week (thanks to the owner), which is behind a clothes store and not used as storage like the Cameo and Arcade. There is still the original ornamentations on the stage, light fixtures on the sides were certainly modified in the 50’s and there is no remaining seats on the orchestra (we’ve not been on the balcony). The curtain is still there too.

nickb
nickb on March 12, 2008 at 12:40 am

Here’s a photo from the Public Library of Broadway at Fifth. You can see the Roxie with what looks like a rectangular marquee. The Library’s holding page says the theatre features Mickey Mouse (and dates the photo as circa 1920s, but hey).

stevebob
stevebob on March 4, 2008 at 10:28 pm

Wow, thanks, Joe! I just knew there had to be neon. And that photo is of such high resolution that it can be highly magnified, too, to show some great details.

I haven’t seen very many pictures that show the Fifth Street Store’s (aka Walker’s, Milliron’s, Ohrbach’s) vertical sign — nice surprise there.

And how beautiful the street lamps were along Broadway then! I never understood why they were replaced with the plain ones (i.e., with the lights hanging in a downward position) by the 1960s, while that earlier, more ornate variety persisted for many years on other downtown streets.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on March 4, 2008 at 9:48 pm

Here’s a b&w photo of Broadway in 1943. Click on it to get to a page with an enlarging feature. There is a high-angled view of the Roxie’s marquee at far right, and it’s probably the original marquee. Click it a few times to make it big enough to see the detail. It’s all covered in neon.

stevebob
stevebob on March 4, 2008 at 9:33 pm

Now that my curiosity about the Roxie’s auditorium has been satisfied (thanks to the LA Conservancy’s recent gallery of downtown theater pics), I’m wondering what the original marquee looked like. Surely the red plastic letters superimposed on white plastic boxes can’t predate the 1950s, but I can’t recall seeing any earlier pictures.

stevebob
stevebob on February 18, 2008 at 10:52 am

Breaking news for those who wondered what the Roxie’s auditorium looks like! There are two interior shots here:

View link

(I found this gallery through the link in “Photos online of downtown Los Angeles theaters” in today’s Theater News on the Cinema Treasures home page.)

Wow! It’s much as I expected — certainly more restrained than the unrelentingly lavish art deco of the Hollywood Pantages or even the Wiltern, but quite lovely and quite impressive nonetheless. (It reminds me of the Fox Pomona, which I had the good fortune to see in a Last Remaining Seats event almost 30 years ago.)

The gallery has lots of pictures of most of the other downtown theaters, including many photos that I’d never seen before. Check it out!

nickb
nickb on January 29, 2008 at 12:53 am

A tidbit: Metzger seems to have had a brief spell in the news in 1928 as the head of a syndicate which procured the Broadway Palace Theater. He became the Palace’s supervising manager and instituted a policy of double feature attractions: a musical comedy plus a photoplay. (A month later the Times reported the policy a success: ‘every attendance record has been shattered.’)