AMC Kabuki 8

1881 Post Street,
San Francisco, CA 94115

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Showing 1 - 25 of 33 comments

stevenj on March 3, 2018 at 4:30 pm

MSC77….You are correct re: 1st THX sound system. The Kabuki was still having live concerts in 1984 when the Galaxy opened.

jeffpiatt on February 27, 2018 at 8:27 am

now the AMC Kabuki 8 again AMC has dropped this theater from the dine in brand

MSC77 on February 10, 2018 at 12:47 pm

The June 1, 2004 comment claiming this was the first San Francisco theater to have THX Sound is not correct. The first was the UA Galaxy. Unfortunately I’ve seen the erroneous claim repeated elsewhere.

jeffpiatt on February 5, 2018 at 2:36 am hopefully one of these two get installed during the upgrade cycle that should be coming soon in 2018 or 2019. AMC is working to get all locations LEED complient or Energy star rated. the last remodel i was in had the paper towels replaced with the Dyson hand driers and signs explaining how the new restrooms were greener.

jeffpiatt on July 17, 2017 at 2:12 am apperently it has the Dine-in menu but not the rest of the features the Express concept seems to be set upo for former Sundance and the former Muvico Thousand Oaks location.

jeffpiatt on June 14, 2017 at 8:53 pm the DOJ trade off already happened they spun off the few that had to go so it’s back as a AMC. it also marked as a “Dine-In Express Pick-up” location so they have the full dine-in menu but you order it and pick it up at the booth and carry it in to the theater. the table may have to wait for a full renovation of the auditorums to add tables.

Scott Neff
Scott Neff on April 28, 2017 at 10:04 am

stevenj – that’s stock footage. All AMC Dine-In theatres show the same picture.

rayman – that’s a good point, but I think it would take somebody filing a lawsuit or bringing the DOJ back into it to make that happen again.

rayman29 on April 27, 2017 at 5:41 pm

So AMC had to sell this theatre because of purchasing Loews, then they got it back as a result of purchasing Carmike. Is AMC selling a nearby theatre so they don’t have too much market share? If not, it was silly to make them sell this theatre in the first place.

stevenj on April 27, 2017 at 2:10 pm

Haven’t been in the Kabuki since last summer but clicked on the Food and Drinks tab on the above link and a menu appears and a photo of patrons being served at their seats. Unlike the Alamo New Mission though their doesn’t appear to be a table in front of you to eat at so assuming your lap is the table. There is also a menu at that link.

Scott Neff
Scott Neff on April 27, 2017 at 1:06 pm

I want to go visit and see if it’s actually become any more “Dine-In” than it was before as Sundance. I think it’s somewhat misleading to call it a “Dine In Theatre” when it’s not one devoted to full meal service.

stevenj on April 25, 2017 at 9:33 am

The name of this theater has changed to AMC Dine In Kabuki 8.

AMC Dine in

sconn on March 26, 2017 at 5:24 pm

Saw Midnight In Paris and The Dark Knight Rises here. Nice organic snack-bar and doesn’t show previews before the film (halleluah!), but they’re kind of jerks checking for IDs outside your theater AFTER one has purchased an alcoholic beverage there.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on February 6, 2013 at 11:30 am

Photos of the Sundance Kabuki Cinemas can be seen on this page at the web site of ELS Architecture and Urban Design, the Berkeley firm that designed the renovation. D.Jamie Rusin was the principal architect for the project.

Previously, ELS has been involved in several restoration and adaptive reuse projects at historic theaters. The include the conversion of the Portland Theatre, Portland, Oregon, into the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall; the expansion and restoration of the California Theatre in San Jose; the restoration of the Fox Theatre in Oakland; and the expansion and restoration of the Grand Theatre at Tracy, California, for the Grand Theatre Center for the Arts.

darquil on April 24, 2010 at 11:35 pm

I’ve posted information and photos from a recent visit here.

CSWalczak on April 4, 2010 at 10:38 pm

When AMC acquired the former Japantown theater and made it a part of an eight-screen multiplex, it also acquired as part of the deal another operation called the Kabuki Hot Springs which was also a part of the original Japantown complex. It was a recreation of a traditional Japanese communal bath with the traditional amenities including the baths, massages, etc. (The exterior appears in the James Bond film “A View to a Kill” though the interior scene was probably filmed at Pinewood).

AMC actually gave it go although the idea of a Kansas City theater chain operating a business of this type was really laughable. The business was popular, and when it began to decline under AMC’s management, it was later sold off. It still exists today as the Kabuki Springs and Spa. There’s discussion of this odd little episode here: View link

CSWalczak on April 4, 2010 at 10:13 pm

A picture of the Sundance Kabuki lobby from the theater’s website: and another of the entrance: View link

The atrium entrance and lobby were originally modifications made by AMC; after becoming a Sundance operation the lobby area was given an upgrade.

Scott Neff
Scott Neff on April 4, 2010 at 7:59 pm

The photo Chuck posted on 5/22/09 is NOT the Sundance Kabuki. The Kabuki was originally built by AMC and looks very much like a multiplex.

TLSLOEWS on April 4, 2010 at 1:24 pm

Nice photo Chuck.

darquil on April 4, 2010 at 12:20 pm

Seating capacities for the eight auditoriums are as follows (unless otherwise noted, the source of each number is the posted maximum occupancy sign outside each auditorium; counts include spaces for wheelchairs):
1 – 327 (downstairs), 182 (balcony) = 509 (summarized by online seating chart; downstairs count differs from posted occupancy of 305)
2 – 99
3 – 178
4 – 162
5 – 171
6 – 151
7 – 57 (manual count from online seating chart)
8 – 57 (manual count from online seating chart)
Total seats: 1384

stevenj on December 12, 2007 at 11:16 am

The Sundance Kabuki officially opens Friday Dec 14th. Check out this link for the whole story on the transformation of SF’s first mutiplex to SF’s “greenist” theater.

View link

domino1003 on April 12, 2007 at 4:06 pm

I was one of the first group of employees hired when the Kabuki opened in 1986, and I was there until 1991. In all that time I saw so many films, both good and bad. I saw my first Pedro Almodovar film, and worked at the first SF International Film Festival that the theater had. I met lots of people, including Danny Glover, Robin Williams and Bonnie Raitt (I remember she needed help because she lost some magazines). When I found out that the theater was aquirred by Sundance Cinemas, a part of me was sad. It’s nice that they will still show films there (I am also a fan of indies and foreign films), but I’ll miss the memories of the first few years that I was there.

sjh5764 on December 3, 2006 at 6:15 am

The Kabuki was also an excellent concert venue. I saw many acts there during the 80s, including The Cure and Stevie Ray Vaughn. It was great because the stage was set so low.

In the early 70s my 1st grade teacher brought our class there to see Kabuki Noh dancers.

timmytoy on July 25, 2006 at 8:06 pm

State OKs Kabuki sale to Sundance

The state attorney general’s office has approved the purchase of San Francisco’s AMC Kabuki multiplex by Sundance Cinemas.

The aspiring independent movie theater chain affiliated with Robert Redford plans to renovate the eight-screen theater to include stadium-style seating. It will be renamed Sundance Kabuki.

Sundance has agreed to operate the Kabuki as a first-run movie theater until 2011. The attorney general’s office required AMC to divest the Kabuki as well as its 14-screen theater at 1000 Van Ness Ave. in order to complete its merger with Loews.

The Sundance schedule will include independent and foreign language films as well as documentaries and classics. Renovation is scheduled to begin this month. An early fall reopening is planned.

— Pia Sarkar