Pacific's Hastings 8

355 N. Rosemead Boulevard,
Pasadena, CA 91107

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Showing 1 - 25 of 86 comments

Ron Pierce
Ron Pierce on September 26, 2018 at 12:31 am

Grand opening ad for October 2, 1968, is now in the photo section

davidcoppock
davidcoppock on September 23, 2018 at 9:38 am

Is this indoor theatre the one that replaced Hastings Drive-in?

Broan
Broan on October 13, 2013 at 5:52 pm

This was featured on the G4 program “Human Wrecking Balls”

terrywade
terrywade on December 30, 2012 at 10:19 am

I guess the large curved D-150 screen was taken out when they turned the place into a multiplex. To bad they didn’t keep it in the large cinema. How sad now It sits all closed up.

William
William on June 18, 2010 at 6:23 pm

The opening film at the Hastings Theatre was “The Graduate”.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on August 2, 2009 at 10:34 pm

Here is a December 1972 ad from the Valley News:
http://tinyurl.com/npacof

Droog
Droog on June 23, 2009 at 3:54 am

I remember a few movies here as a kid, Close Encounters and Time Bandits. And probably many Disney films in the 70s.

lanceglover
lanceglover on January 22, 2009 at 6:29 am

The first film I saw at the Pasadena Hastings was ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, which was released in April of 1968, so this was likely one of the very first screenings at the theatre. I was 10 years old, and since my dad worked on the Apollo space program, I was extremely interested in all things related to space travel, and incredibly excited to see this movie. Since it was a late showing, and the movie long, rather slow-paced, and the seats quite comfortable, I (of course) fell asleep just before the classic final sequence. When I woke up, I asked my parents what I’d missed, and I think it might have been the first time I’d ever asked a question they couldn’t answer. I didn’t get to see it in its entirety until years later, when I finally understood their befuddled silence. It remains one of my favorite films, and the Hastings from then on always a magical place to see movies.

Sorry to hear the Rialto is also no more. That theatre was (along with the Fox Venice- now sadly an indoor ‘swap meet’ and the Nuart, thankfully still screening films) one of the ‘trinity’ of LA area art houses responsible for introducing foreign and independent films to an entire generation in the ‘70’s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on December 16, 2008 at 10:27 pm

The original Hastings Theatre was designed by South Pasadena architect Roland Decker Pierson. Pierson had earlier designed at least two other big, single-screen theaters for the Sterling Organization, these being the Rolling Hills Theatre in Torrance, and the Montclair Theatre in Montclair.

The Hastings was the subject of an article in the March 25, 1968, issue of Boxoffice Magazine, describing the unusual features of its design, including its continental seating arrangement and reverse auditorium. The seating capacity was given as 1,542.

Two more theaters that can be attributed to Roland Decker Pierson are the Edwards Huntington in Huntington Beach, and the Azusa Drive-In in Azusa.

drb
drb on September 13, 2008 at 5:44 pm

I took some photos the day before it closed. They’re just from a cheap pocket-sized Nikon. I just took photos until an usher yelled at me to stop, because they didn’t want photos showing up in the paper (from a cheap pocket camera?), so I waited until she left and took more pictures. What was she going to do, ban me from coming back? The place was closing!

Anyway, exterior:
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Interior, main house:
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Torn draperies in the back:
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Blurry photo of one of the little side screens:
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More exteriors:
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Night shots:
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William
William on June 18, 2008 at 3:14 pm

The status of the theatre should be listed as closed now.

markp
markp on May 18, 2008 at 6:07 am

I just viewed some of the photos posted on Cinematour and that huge auditorium sure brings back memories of some of the huge theatres we once had here in New Jersey. Nice wide room, with acres of seats, and how about all that carpeting in front of the screen before the first row of seats. Nowadays all we get are shoeboxes and tile floor (if we’re lucky).

William
William on May 18, 2008 at 5:46 am

Yes, the main house at the Chinese Theatre is still large as is the Village Theatre in Westwood.

alban63
alban63 on May 17, 2008 at 11:21 pm

Gone? GONE?! I think I’m going to cry!
Though I didn’t discover this place until it became a multiplex, it still had that large screen auditorium. I went to see all three of the “Lord of the Rings” movies there. They opened for those three years right around my birthday so that was part of my birthday present. I took my cousin there to see the Harry Potter movies. Where do we go now? (Honestly, I can’t think of where there are big screens any longer. Is the main auditorium at Grauman’s Chinese still fairly large? It’s been years since I’ve been there.)
Movies are special to me. It seems like they should be an experience in and of themselves. I love going at night to large screen theatres. Somehow leaving a theatre at nighttime lets me bask in the movie magic for just a little while longer.
I hate multiplexes with there little non-descipt rooms. I once went to one where the theatre I went into wasn’t much larger than my combo living room/dining area. And the screen was no larger than a big screen TV. No joke. I can’t remember what film that was now. If I want to watch a film on a TV screen I’ll stay home.

Dublinboyo
Dublinboyo on October 23, 2007 at 3:41 pm

What a shame about the Hastings. Just read the post and saw that it has been closed – again for lack of attention. It was, without a doubt, the best room to see a big screen presenation of a film in the Pasadena/San Gabriel Valley.. The first film I reacll seeing there was “Looking for Mr. Goodbar” in 1977 – pretty heady stuff for a naive 17 year old Irish-Catholic boy! I had to read the novel to figure out what I had just seen. Other films over the years included, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind;” Blade Runner;“ "The World According to Garp;” “Blue Thunder;” “Krull;” and “Indiana Jones and the Lost Crusade;” and “Crimson Tide.” Great theater, lots of good memories. It was bad enough when they divided it the first time, but when they divided THAT and created those little shoe-box theaters (greed?), it was really terrible. But as long as the main auditorium was intact – and you checked that your film was playing in it – it was still worth going out there to see it. Now it’s gone – along with all the great other Pasadena theaters and Alhambra theaters of my youth, including The Monterey, The Garfield, The El Rey and recently, The Rialto. Now they only exist in my memory. I even went to the Hastings a few times with my ex-wife and mother in law to see “Godfather III” and “Dances with Wolves!” Yikes. Lest we forget …

markinthedark
markinthedark on September 6, 2007 at 12:00 am

I think the marquee was damaged in a storm and not repaired to working condition.

KramSacul
KramSacul on September 5, 2007 at 10:05 pm

The thing is that they did use to have all the movies listed on the marquee, with the one playing in the big theater using bigger letters.

Ed Collins
Ed Collins on September 5, 2007 at 9:59 pm

My guess, and it’s just a guess, is that with eight different screens, there wasn’t room enough on that marquee to list all of the shows and showtimes.

That marquee is the original marquee, back when it was just a large single screen theatre. (About 1986 is when the theatre underwent its first expansion.)

A better question might be why didn’t Pacific upgrade and build a LARGER marquee, at the time when they expanded the theatre and added the additional screens.

KramSacul
KramSacul on September 5, 2007 at 9:49 pm

What’s the reason for not putting the showtimes on the marquee? It doesn’t seem like Pacific wanted this place to succeed, does it?

markinthedark
markinthedark on September 5, 2007 at 8:34 pm

Me not enough. I only popped by and bought a ticket just to snoop around. I have some pictures too. Ed’s cover most of what I got but I’ll get em to Cinematour.

KramSacul
KramSacul on September 5, 2007 at 8:25 pm

Thank you for the pictures. I spent way too much time at this place.

Scott Neff
Scott Neff on September 4, 2007 at 5:38 pm

Ed’s photos can be viewed over at CinemaTour. It doesn’t seem as though we could photoshop the interior auditorium photos as well as I had hoped, but hey, it’s something!

http://www.cinematour.com/tour/us/2704.html

KramSacul
KramSacul on August 27, 2007 at 9:17 pm

Wow, the management sounds like a bunch of inept idiots. Good riddance. I’m sad that this theater is going though. I remember seeing many movies in the main auditorium: MIB, Mars Attacks, The Rock, Star Wars SE, Twister, Batman Forever, Nightmare Before Christmas, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Dark City…

Scott Neff
Scott Neff on August 27, 2007 at 11:04 am

Ed, if you e-mail all your photos to me at we can do our best to Photoshop them to a viewable level. I’m sure anybody who liked this theatre would be happy to see ANY photos, no matter how blurry or limited they may be.

Ed Collins
Ed Collins on August 27, 2007 at 10:39 am

See my post four posts above this.

Friday afternoon someone from Pacific finally returned my phone call. Of course by this time I pretty much knew the final night was Sunday. The woman from Pacific said that they would go dark on MONDAY! I asked her what does this mean… that Sunday was the last day to see a movie or that Monday was? She confirmed again… Monday would be the last day to see a movie. Ha! I didn’t bother telling her that moviefone.com did not list any showtimes for Monday. How could she get that wrong?

At least they returned my call.

Friday afternoon I took the time to go there. (It’s quite a distance from where I live.) I met an assistant manager, introduced myself, told him of my history with the place, and asked if I could take photos of the lobby, the large auditorium, the marquee, etc. He told me no. He didn’t even offer to let me in. I went ahead and took photos of the outside of the theatre, and all the while kept expecting the cops to show up and arrest me for trespassing or something. I walked around the entire building, and tried to take as many photos as I could, from all different angles, of not only the building but the parking lot, the marquee, etc.

Sunday evening after work, about 9:00 pm, I returned. THIS time I made a few prior phone calls to a few people I still know, and with a friend of mine who also used to work there YEARS ago, (Rick Landis – he’s mentioned in the article I posted) the two of us had “permission” to go inside and take a few photos. (The reception we received wasn’t very warm at all.)

Alas, my little digital camera doesn’t have a very good flash at all. I don’t even believe the photos I took of the large auditorium, which was quite dark at the time, are even worth posting.

At least I got to see the large auditorium again. I’ve been there just twice in the past 22 years and both times I obviously saw a movie in one of the smaller houses. The large house was left much larger than I would have guessed. I would have thought they would have chopped it up even more than what they did, when redesigning the place. It still seats 900+, according to the occupancy sign posted above the door.

Note: By now all of the seats in ALL of the auditoriums may already have been removed. A 30-man crew was there, beginning to dismantle them. They were going to work all night long and they said they hoped to have them all out by morning.