Fox Theater

1005 W. Sprague Avenue,
Spokane, WA 99201

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Showing 1 - 25 of 30 comments

Griffinteam
Griffinteam on February 26, 2013 at 3:53 am

Jean Anthony Greif performed and also had a business at the Fox building. His business was called: Northwest Organ and Chimes. He also wrote many songs, including the theme song for the Expo 74. He is my Grandfather and passed away in 1981. http://www.pstos.org/organists/wa/greif.htm

corgi
corgi on February 7, 2013 at 11:09 am

What beautiful Theater! Attended several movies there in the 70’s. Very happy it was restored. These magnificant venues can never be replaced.

Mikeyisirish
Mikeyisirish on June 26, 2012 at 8:56 am

A 2012 photo can be seen here.

PopcornNRoses
PopcornNRoses on January 12, 2011 at 12:40 pm

Hmmm…You have a point there! I guess it must have been a general release film then. But I’ve no idea which one it was. Definitely not Barry Lyndon, though. But it obviously was good enough to be considered educational enough as far as facts went to hold screenings for school kids in a multitude of districts.

William
William on January 12, 2011 at 12:25 pm

I was just stating general release titles since standard movie theatres only show 35mm and not 16mm which is the regular format for educational films.

PopcornNRoses
PopcornNRoses on January 12, 2011 at 12:16 pm

No, I don’t think it was a “general release” but one that was made as an educational history film aimed at teenagers. It was definitely about the Revolutionary War, but it’s not a film I remember has having come out to theatres.

William
William on January 12, 2011 at 12:09 pm

What about “Barry Lyndon” (1975)?

PopcornNRoses
PopcornNRoses on January 11, 2011 at 3:01 am

No, I wish it had been – I remember being bored to tears by the movie. I am sure it was the spring of either 1976 or 1977, although I must have seen the poster at another time – I was still in junior high during the field trip to the movie, and it was shown in a special screening to hoards of junior high kids from the area.

William
William on January 6, 2011 at 3:33 pm

“I Wanna Hold Your Hand” was released in 1978. That film on the Revolutionary War, could it have been “1776” from 1972?

PopcornNRoses
PopcornNRoses on January 6, 2011 at 1:36 pm

I remember seeing “Smokey And The Bandit” here in 1977 – it was opening weekend, and I had to sit all the way in front – it took my neck a week to recover, but it was a lot of fun! We also came to the Fox one day on a field trip from school to see a film about the Revolutionary War – darned if I can remember what the film was, but I know that during regular hours, “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” was playing in one of the theatres, so that puts it at 1976 or so.

Incidentally, I’m doing some research on a series of articles i’m planning about my theatre experiences over the years – I grew up in the Spokane area in the 60s and 70s, and there are ton of theatres I remember – both indoor and drive-ins – that are not listed here. Anyone know of another good site or sites about Spokane area theatre history? I’d greatly appreciate any and all info I could find out – thanks!

CaptVonKrapp
CaptVonKrapp on December 13, 2010 at 2:16 pm

I love that 1975 ad! Funny Lady, French Connection II and Rooster Cogburn—I guess I shouldn’t complain too much the next time I look up what’s showing at the local multi-plex!

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on May 27, 2010 at 6:52 pm

well, if they booked “GATOR” with “GONE WITH THE WIND” they would have had two Georgia based flicks.What double feature,Wish Burt,A Georgia Boy could see it.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on May 27, 2010 at 6:37 pm

Thats quite a good deal!

William
William on May 27, 2010 at 5:45 pm

Just above the Mann ad is a ad for the Starlite Drive-In for “Gone with the Wind” and “White Lightning” plus 3 cartoons for a carload price of $2.00.

rivest266
rivest266 on May 27, 2010 at 5:02 pm

Tri-Plex opening ad from November 15th, 1975 View link
Mann sold it a few weeks later.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on May 25, 2010 at 6:35 pm

Nice opening day ad Mike.

rivest266
rivest266 on May 24, 2010 at 5:21 pm

Grand opening section can be found at View link

KenLayton
KenLayton on April 9, 2008 at 8:41 pm

Typically the “ban” on movies is on first run movies.

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on April 9, 2008 at 7:42 pm

I didn’t see the need to point out in the revised Introduction that it is un-triplexed, but yes, of course!
as to movies, as a lawyer, I will speculate that all movies are precluded.

markp
markp on April 9, 2008 at 7:28 pm

I am assuming it was un-triplexed. Also, not showing movies until 2020 would include old time movie festivals as well?

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on November 21, 2007 at 7:15 am

A slide show of photos taken at the grand re-opening can be seen here:
www.spokesmanreview.com/blogs/video/archive.asp?postID=306

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on November 2, 2007 at 1:12 pm

“Attracts the public, and makes them come back”, I think.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on November 2, 2007 at 1:09 pm

Featured in this 1936 trade ad in Spanish for Yorke air-conditioning systems: www.i8.photobucket.com/albums/a18/Warrengwhiz/foxspokane.jpg

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on March 1, 2007 at 1:42 pm

What a great building! I am continually amazed. Every time I think I know ‘em all another one shows up.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on March 1, 2007 at 12:54 pm

Problems in September 1969. Note that the officers had to see the movie twice before taking action:

‘I Am Curious’ Disappears

SPOKANE (AP) – The motion picture “I Am Curious (Yellow)“ disappeared abruptly from the screen of the Fox Theater here Friday, just hours after a superior court judge declared the film obscene. The theater was closed when Spokane County Pros. Atty. Donald C. Brockett and a police inspector went to the theater Friday evening to view the controversial motion picture again with the intention of possibly seizing the film and arresting theater officials.

Brockett and Inspector Thomas O'Brien said they had nothing to do with the closure of the film. Theater officials were unavailable for comment. A few hours before, Superior Court Judge John Lally ruled the picture was legally obscene under the nebulous guidelines set down by the U.S. Supreme Court. At the same time, the judge denied Brockett’s request for an order to seize the film. Lally ruled he had no such authority, but noted the prosecuting attorney could obtain the film through an arrest since the film had been declared obscene following a court hearing.