Capitol Theatre

1645 Broadway,
New York, NY 10019

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RSM3853
RSM3853 on December 27, 2013 at 11:31 pm

Films at Loew’s Capitol (Cinerama) from 1957 to its closing in 1968. Dates are the Wednesday of the opening week. DateTitle 12/18/57Legend of the Lost 01/15/58Bonjour Tristesse 02/19/58Cowboy 03/19/58Teacher’s Pet 05/07/58The Sheepman 05/28/58Vertigo 07/02/58Kings Go Forth 08/06/58The Naked and the Dead 09/10/58Dunkirk 10/01/58Onionhead 10/22/58Torpedo Run 11/12/58Houseboat 12/17/58The Buccaneer 01/28/59The Trap 02/11/59Never Steal Anything Small 03/04/59Night of the Quarter Moon 03/25/59Tempest 04/29/59The Mating Game 05/20/59The World, the Flesh, and the Devil 06/17/59The Five Pennies 07/29/59Last Train from Gun Hill 08/26/59It Started With a Kiss 09/16/59Tamango 09/30/59But Not for Me 12/23/59Solomon and Sheba 02/17/60The Last Voyage 03/16/60Heller in Pink Tights 04/06/60The Unforgiven 05/25/60The Rat Race 07/06/60Elmer Gantry 08/10/60Ocean’s 11 10/11/60Hell to Eternity 11/16/60Butterfield 8 02/01/61The Misfits 03/08/61Go Naked in the World 03/29/61One-Eyed Jacks 05/24/61Atlantis, the Lost Continent 06/21/61The Parent Trap 07/19/61By Love Posessed 08/23/61Ada 09/20/61A Thunder of Drums 10/11/61Back Street 11/15/61Bachelor in Paradise 12/27/61The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone 02/07/62Sergeants 3 03/28/62Sweet Bird of Youth 05/23/62The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence 08/08/62The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm 03/27/63How the West Was Won 12/25/63The Best of Cinerama ® 06/24/64Circus World 11/04/64Where Love Has Gone 11/25/64First Men in the Moon 12/23/64Cheyenne Autumn 02/24/65Love Has Many Faces 03/03/65Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte 03/24/65John Goldfarb, Please Come Home 04/07/65Major Dundee 04/21/65Nobody Waved Goodbye 05/05/65Synanon 05/19/65Peyton Place/Return to Peyton Place ® 05/26/65The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders 06/09/65Up from the Beach 06/16/65A High Wind in Jamaica 06/30/65The Hallelujah Trail 09/15/65The Reward 09/22/65Marriage on the Rocks 10/27/65The Cincinnati Kid 12/22/65Doctor Zhivago 02/01/67The Night of the Generals 03/15/67In Like Flint 04/12/67Georgy Girl/The Professionals ® 04/26/67Casino Royale 06/14/67The Dirty Dozen 08/02/67In the Heat of the Night 10/18/67Far From the Madding Crowd 02/07/68Planet of the Apes 04/03/682001: A Space Odyssey

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 16, 2013 at 1:55 am

One answer might be that the New York metropolitan area had multiple Cinerama theaters at the time the MGM Cinerama films were released. There was one in Montclair NJ (the Clairidge), two on Long Island NY (the Syosset in Syosset and the Twin South in Hicksville), and one in Rockland County NY (the Route 59), which was Cinerama only for a short time, but it did play How the West Was Won.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 16, 2013 at 1:09 am

Hello to Al A.–

as always thank for the info. i have another question that i find just as fascinating. my parents took me to see the roadshow engagements of both The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm and How The West Was Won at this theater. i always assumed they had healthy roadshow runs. to which i was quite surprised to find out TWWOTBG’s lasted only 33 weeks and HTWWW’s lasted only 39 weeks. i can see MGM having to pull TWWOTBG even if it was still doing good box office to open HTWWW. but why was HTWWW pulled after only 39 weeks? the roadshow run of HTWWW in both L.A.and San Francisco lasted a lot longer than 39 weeks if i am not mistaken. so what gives?

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on September 15, 2013 at 11:10 pm

It moved across the street to the Embassy 49, but the ads don’t specify the format. It ran again later that summer at the Guild for a couple of months.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 15, 2013 at 10:41 pm

to Bill H.–

thanks for your reply. five seconds after clicking on add comment it dawned on me that as well as the film was still doing MGM had to pull it to open their big year end “in Cinerama” film Ice Station Zebra. so while it may not have been “in Cinerama” or on a 2 a day roadshow policy did the film at least move to another theater for an exclusive run in 70MM? the reason i ask is simple.

The Sound of Music ran at the Rivoli on a 2 a day roadshow policy in Todd-AO from i believe the first week of March 1965 to the last week of Sept. 1966. normally it would have then gone to the prominent theaters in the other boroughs that traditionally played 20th Century Fox Films after their big 1st runs in Manhattan. but that didn’t happen. the film then moved to the Cinema Rendevous on 57th St. on a continuous performance policy of 3 shows a day and played there i believe 6 months.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on September 15, 2013 at 8:45 pm

I think the reason “2001”’s Cinerama run in New York was so short is because MGM had “Ice Station Zebra” ready to go out, and there was only one Cinerama theater in New York at that time. So they sacrificed “2001” in Cinerama to make room for “Zebra”. But the 35mm version of “2001” played in only a handful of theaters in Manhattan until March 1969, so the movie played New York for a week or two short of one year before going into wide release.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on September 15, 2013 at 7:51 pm

Hello-

I was fortunate to have seen 2001: A Space Odyssey twice at this theater during its 2 a day “in Cinerama” roadshow engagement. I believe said engagement lasted on 24 weeks due to the Capitol closing prior to demolition. but the exact same engagement moved 4 blocks south to the Warmer Cinerama where it ran
another 13 weeks. the reason I bring this up is simple. when I found this out rather recently I was shocked that the film’s Manhattan roadshow run was only 37 weeks. compare this to the 2 a day roadshow engagement at the Warner in Hollywood which lasted 103 weeks and the 2 a day roadshow run at the Golden Gate in San Francisco which lasted I believe 72 weeks. and does one explain that?

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on September 14, 2013 at 9:43 pm

Perhaps “2001” with a live orchestra is not a bad compromise.

Sept. 20-21.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on September 6, 2013 at 3:35 pm

You might also look in Billboard microfilm for the information that you can’t find in Variety. Billboard also reviewed vaudeville and movie palace stage shows until it switched exclusively to covering the music industry…And the skips in Variety might just be due to hold-overs. The Capitol’s programs didn’t always change every week.

paulaeisensteinbaker
paulaeisensteinbaker on September 6, 2013 at 2:19 am

Thanks, Tinseltoes; I’ve been reading Variety (which luckily is in a univ library in my city), but it occurred to me that someone might have evidence from some other source. And Variety occasionally does skip a week in reporting on the Capitol (or fail to mention the overture in a given week).

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on September 4, 2013 at 7:55 pm

By the time of its 1968 closure as a Cinerama showcase, the Capitol’s seating capacity had been reduced to 1,950, critic Bosley Crowther noted in The New York Times on 9/16/68.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on September 4, 2013 at 3:17 pm

Although it would be very time consuming, Paula, you could probably find the date in the archives of weekly Variety, which reviewed each and every stage presentation in the history of the Capitol Theatre. But to take a guess, I would say that overtures were dropped when the Capitol switched from self-produced stage revues to a variety/vaudeville format employing “name” headliners and supporting acts. That was probably 1930-31, as the Depression worsened. Some public libraries in large cities have Variety on microfilm in their research departments.

paulaeisensteinbaker
paulaeisensteinbaker on July 30, 2013 at 8:03 pm

Does anyone have specific information about when an overture stopped being part of the show at the Capitol?

Thanks for any leads. I’m still looking for programs from the 1920s, too.

bigjoe59
bigjoe59 on June 20, 2013 at 7:47 pm

Hello-

shouldn’t the last line in the intro be changed? the original Cinerama roadshow engagement of “2001” did not end when the Capitol was closed previous to being demolished. it immediately continued at the Warner Cinerama at 47th St. and Bway.

BobbyS
BobbyS on June 20, 2013 at 6:04 am

Ofcourse you are right, I was speaking in general and the way the nation looked compared to the problems of the cities today.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on June 19, 2013 at 5:58 pm

1958 was a great year if you were a straight, white Christian male. Otherwise, you may have encountered some roadblocks.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 19, 2013 at 5:47 pm

1968 was a bad year in American history, but a great year for American movies. And British movies, if you count “2001” as British, and if you consider the year’s Oscar-winning Best Picture “Oliver!”

BobbyS
BobbyS on June 19, 2013 at 5:29 pm

You are all correct. 1968 was terrible. I was mistakenly thinking of 1958, which of course was a better year.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 19, 2013 at 4:35 pm

This season of Mad Men takes place in 1968. They’ve already dealt with the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, and the Chicago anti-Vietnam war riot at the Democratic National Convention. Characters have gone to see “Planet of the Apes” and “Rosemary’s Baby”. I hope someone goes to see “2001” – season finale is this Sunday. If they do go, it’ll be at the Capitol.

AlAlvarez
AlAlvarez on June 19, 2013 at 3:27 pm

Bobby, 1968 was one of the most tumultuous and violent years ever.

BobbyS
BobbyS on June 19, 2013 at 4:58 am

Thanks Bill…..Wonderful ads..What a kinder & gentle world it was when “2001” opened…and you saw it at the Capitol !!

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on June 18, 2013 at 8:17 pm

In honor of the 45th anniversary of seeing “2001” at the Capitol this past Saturday 6/15, I’m posting this article from LIFE magazine 6/7/68. I read it in a dentist’s office back then and haven’t seen it since, until today.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on June 18, 2013 at 3:25 pm

The Capitol’s longtime telephone number of CIRcle 5500 is now 247-5500 and assigned to the Nook Restaurant at 746 Ninth Avenue.

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on November 14, 2012 at 3:06 pm

Who knew that within a few years time, Lucille Ball would become Queen of the entertainment medium known as television?

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on November 14, 2012 at 2:13 pm

Excerpt from Bosley Crowthers' NY Times' review of 11/14/47:

“What with Frank Sinatra as the star of the Capitol’s stage show, it wasn’t likely that much attention would be paid to the film on the screen. So the management has graciously provided the least temptation in this respect — a feather-weight farce, from Columbia, entitled ‘Her Husband’s Affairs’…But in nonsense as well as serious drama, there must be a pattern, a plan, to sustain the humor. This film has none. Mr. Sinatra, take it away!”