Loew's Capitol Theatre

1645 Broadway,
New York, NY 10019

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Showing 776 - 800 of 974 comments

RobertR
RobertR on August 13, 2005 at 6:27 pm

In this 1933 ad for “Hell Below” it mentions being “Direct from it’s $2 engagement at the Astor.
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BoxOfficeBill
BoxOfficeBill on August 6, 2005 at 4:43 am

Warren— I want to refer readers to your spirited accounts of Gable’s live turn in your post above, last 16-17 Feb., and to the longer account in your book about Gable. It’s hilariously racy.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on August 2, 2005 at 3:51 am

I believe even the great Eugene Ormandy conducted the Capitol orchestra in the 20’s. What a great period for American popular culture and classical music!

Linde
Linde on August 1, 2005 at 10:25 pm

Even in the mid 1920’s the Capitol had a symphonic orchestra, “The Grand Capitol Orchestra” conducted by David Mendoza, and its own ballet corp, too. A 1926 ad claimed that it was the biggest motion picture palace in the world.

RobertR
RobertR on August 1, 2005 at 8:45 am

Nice pic Warren look at the little round signs advertising the wide vision screens. Remember “It’s a Wonderful Life” also went public domain and somehow they got it back to being licensed.

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 29, 2005 at 8:48 am

Thanks again, Warren. I especially like the 4th one (“Held Over! By Public Clamor!)

BoxOfficeBill
BoxOfficeBill on July 28, 2005 at 4:57 am

Warren— gorgeous. I remember the Capitol’s ‘40s-'50s color scheme as green (the color of the immense traveler curtain) and brown (the woodwork), but your notation of olive is no doubt accurate. And, yes, silver leaf rather than gold: I always remember the Capitol as full of glittering accents, showing off the crystal and marble to best effect.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on July 27, 2005 at 6:31 am

For me nothing beats the Music Hall but on this one I’m with Warren(though Dunne and Coburn are two of my favorites.) Is Under 21 shown on TCM at 8 in the morning or is it lost to the ages?

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 27, 2005 at 5:45 am

It’s weird seeing Alexander Knox as a romantic comedy lead – to me he will always be “Wilson”.

RobertR
RobertR on July 27, 2005 at 4:05 am

1952 “The Quiet Man” opened at the Capitol
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RobertR
RobertR on July 24, 2005 at 12:57 pm

September 1965 the Capitol was part of the showcase presentation of “The Reward"
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VincentParisi
VincentParisi on July 20, 2005 at 5:32 am

But I believe between Jim and Ecstasy there were a few other films. did Jim even make it to May?

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 20, 2005 at 5:17 am

8 of the 9 films Warren mentioned are listed in the directory. When I said “summer movie”, I meant it the way they use the term now: big, dumb action movies or adaptations of comic books. That’s a pretty classy bunch of titles moviegoers had to choose from in the summer of 1965. We’ve come a long way since then – a long way backward.

William
William on July 20, 2005 at 5:09 am

“Lord Jim” opened at the State on Feb. 25th, the next Roadshow into the State was “The Agony and the Ecstasy” on Oct. 7th of 1965.

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on July 20, 2005 at 4:21 am

But didn’t Lord Jim open as an Easter roadshow at Loew’s State and after a dismal few months(if that long) was then dumped onto drive-in double bills?
Also weren’t Magnificent Men and Hallelujah Trail the only roadshows to ever open as summer films and consequently neither made it to the fall?

VincentParisi
VincentParisi on July 20, 2005 at 2:34 am

Interesting that Mary Poppins is still playing at a number of theaters a year after it opened. And at the Cinema Village and 68th Street no less!

Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 19, 2005 at 1:19 pm

Here is an area directory of theaters from the Aug. 11, 1965 issue of the New York Journal-American. Considering most of the titles on view here, the concept of the “summer movie” had not yet taken hold.

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Bill Huelbig
Bill Huelbig on July 19, 2005 at 1:29 am

Here is a double ad from August 1965 for both of Manhattan’s Cinerama theaters:

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RobertR
RobertR on July 18, 2005 at 3:25 pm

Christmas 1960 while “The Misfits” was playing the Capitol, Loew’s also opened it at the Metropolitan.
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RobertR
RobertR on July 13, 2005 at 10:49 am

1955 Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hagerty arrive at the Capitol
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RobertR
RobertR on July 13, 2005 at 10:48 am

Edward G. Robinson at the same premiere
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RobertR
RobertR on July 13, 2005 at 10:47 am

This undated photo shows Sophie Tucker arriving at the Capitol
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RobertR
RobertR on July 9, 2005 at 7:14 pm

Here is the ad from that unusual booking of “Duel in the Sun” that opened at the Capitol and 38 neighborhood Loew's
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Ron Newman
Ron Newman on July 4, 2005 at 5:17 am

From the 1967 Loew’s annual report:

“The land under Loew’s Capitol Theatre on Broadway in New York City has been leased to Uris Building Corporation, which will demolish the theatre and erect a 1,700,000 sq. ft. office building. Loew’s ownership of the basic lease should enable us to realize between $16,000,000 and $17,000,000 on this property, if we elect to mortgage or dispose of it.

“Your Company has many theatres and commercial properties in excellent locations, many of which are completely free and clear of mortgage debt. It is our intention to carry out a mortgaging program over the next few years. With the addition of mortgage money and cash flow to our present cash and security position, we project having available resources approximating $200,000,000 during the next three years. At the opportune time, we intend to use this fund for a major acquisiiion. Pending the fulfillment of this program, we are making investments in marketable securities.”

A year later, that “major acquisition” turned out to be Lorillard, a tobacco company.