Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 151 - 175 of 9,863 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tiger Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 2:24 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin compiled by Thomas M. Shelby lists the Tiger Theatre in Auburn as one of his projects. However, it is listed as a 1927 project, so perhaps Whilldin only designed some alterations the year after the house opened.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Birmingham Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 2:16 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin, compiled by Thomas M. Shelby, lists the Pantages Theatre as one of his projects from 1927. However, as B. Marcus Priteca pretty much had a lock on theater designs for Pantages, it’s most likely that he designed the 1927 remodeling and that Whilldin acted as supervising architect.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Famous Theater on Jan 29, 2015 at 2:06 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin, compiled by Thomas M. Shelby, lists the Famous Theatre in Birmingham as a 1926-27 project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ensley Theatre on Jan 29, 2015 at 1:55 am

A master list of buildings designed by Birmingham architect D. O. Whilldin compiled by Thomas M. Shelby lists the Ensley Theatre as one of his projects.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lincoln Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 8:51 pm

The Lincoln Theatre was definitely in operation by mid-1921. Construction began in 1920, but I haven’t been able to discover if it opened late that year or early in 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Olympia Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 8:22 pm

A July 1, 1916, article in The Moving Picture World reported on the Olympia Theatre and noted that it was the first theater ever designed by architect W. L. Mowll.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tide Theatre on Jan 28, 2015 at 1:29 pm

Here is a 1986 photo of The Pitcher Show from American Classic Images. The November 11, 1983, issue of The Tuscaloosa News said that the Tide I & II Theatre would reopen that night as The Pitcher Show (Google News.) As the Pitcher Show the house served beer, wine, and food along with the movies. Despite the change in format, the house was still being operated by Cobb Theatres.

The February 5, 1969, issue of the News had an ad for the Tide I & II saying that there would be an open house on Thursday night (February 6) and the gala opening of the theater would take place on Friday, February 7.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Brownwood Lyric Theatre on Jan 27, 2015 at 3:01 pm

The June 19, 1914, issue of The Daily Bulletin, Brownwood’s newspaper, said that J. M. Robb of Big Springs had taken a one-year lease on the Brownwood Theatre, and that his son Harrell Robb would become the manager of the house. The partnership of Pearman & Griffin had operated the theater since its opening in March. The article didn’t mention the name Lyric Theatre, so it probably got that name some time later, perhaps in 1918 when the 1958 Bulletin article LouisRugani cited in the first comment said that it had opened.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avon Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 12:21 pm

A December 17, 1921, article in Exhibitors Trade Review indicates that by that time the Avon Theatre was being operated by the Empsall family, who were owners of an eponymous department store in Watertown. The Empsalls had been interested in acquiring the three theaters operated at Watertown by Papayanakos Brothers, but the brothers sold their houses to the Robbins Amusement Company of Utica instead.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 12:13 pm

The December 17, 1921, issue of Exhibitors Trade Review said that the three houses in Watertown operated by Papayanakos Brothers had been sold to the Robbins Amusement company of Utica. Papayanakos Brothers had taken over operation of the Antique Theatre in 1911, four years after they took over the Wonderland, later renamed Palace, and six years before the built the Olympic Theatre. The Antique had been opened in 1908 by the Mullin Film Service. The Lyric, which Papayankos Brothers had taken over before 1911 and which they still operated in 1916, was not mentioned in the article, so must have closed by late 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 11:50 am

The December 17, 1921, issue of Exhibitors Trade Review reported the sale of three houses operated at Watertown by Papayanakos Brothers to the Robbins Amusement Company of Utica. One of them was the Palace. Papayanakos Brothers had taken over this house in 1907,when it was called the Wonderland Theatre. It was renamed the Palace following a later remodeling (probably after 1916.) Robbins also took over the Olympic and Antique Theatres in Watertown as part of the same deal.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Olympic Theatre on Jan 26, 2015 at 11:22 am

An article in the December 17, 1921, issue of Exhibitors Trade Review said that the Olympic Theatre had been built and opened by the Papayanakos Brothers in 1917. The house had just been bought by the Robbins Amusement Company of Utica, who planned a forty-foot addition to the rear of the theater so that live theatrical attractions could be accommodated. Two other Papayankos houses in Watertown, the Palace and the Antique, were also taken over by Robbins.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Decotah Theatre on Jan 25, 2015 at 12:01 pm

The “New Theaters and Changes in Dakota” column of the November 15, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World said that the Iris Theatre had been opened at Edgeley, North Dakota.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Odeon Theatre on Jan 25, 2015 at 10:39 am

The Hume Theatre was built in 1931. This item is from the January 18, 1931 issue of The Film Daily:

“Burlington, Ont. — Plans are in progress for the erection of a $25,000 theater here by Rex Hume. Geo. T. Evans of Hamilton, Ont., is the architect.”
Rex Hume came to Burlington in 1924 to operate the Crystal Theatre, which he had recently bought, according to research by Peggy Armstrong of the Burlington Historical Society. Architect George Thomas Evans had his office in Hamilton, but resided in Burlington for at least part of his life, having designed a house for himself there in 1928. He was known primarily for designing churches and schools.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about California Theatre on Jan 24, 2015 at 11:42 am

Not to be nitpicky, but the 1921 sale mentioned in the description was not to Fox West Coast Theatres, which didn’t exist until 1928, but to its predecessor, West Coast Theatres, founded in 1920.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Jan 23, 2015 at 12:01 pm

The Liberty Theatre in Columbus,Kansas, was mentioned in the July 14, 1919, issue of The Film Daily. Four years later, the July 14, 1923, issue of The Moving Picture World reported an improvement to the house:

“N. W. Houghston of the Liberty Theatre at Columbus, Kas., has installed two Typhoon fans. One is installed in order to take care of the balcony, while the other will send cool breezes over the orchestra.”
The products of the New York City-based Typhoon Fan Company were mentioned fairly often in early theater industry trade journals. They were a popular appliance in theaters before the advent of air conditioning. For those who might be interested, there are a few photos of Typhoon fans, and a vintage ad for the company, on this page of a discussion board at the web site of the Antique Fan Collectors Association (who knew there were fan fans?)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Park Theatre on Jan 21, 2015 at 11:20 pm

This item appeared in the March 29, 1919, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“BARBERTON, O. — Park Theatre Company, care A. J. Heiman, 156 Columbia street, has plans by Swirsky & Miller, Ohio Building, for two-story moving picture theatre and office building, 48 by 100 feet, to cost $50,000.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Jan 21, 2015 at 9:59 pm

The Orpheum in New London was to feature musical duo Bell and Richards on November 15, 1909, according to advertisements in Variety.

The Rialto is mentioned in the October 21, 1922, issue of Exhibitors Herald.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Phoenix Theatre (I) on Jan 20, 2015 at 8:28 pm

It appears that this house later went back to its original name. The Phoenix City and Salt River Valley Directory of 1912 has the Third Avenue Theatre listed as one of five houses in the city and gives the location as Third Avenue between Washington and Jefferson. The Third Avenue Theatre was also mentioned in the December 2, 1911, issue of the Arizona Republican, though it was hosting a political meeting, not a theatrical event.

The other theaters listed in 1912 were the Savoy, Adams corner of 1st; the Coliseum, corner 1st and E. Monroe; the Wigwam, 31 N. 1st; and the Elks' Theatre, 332 W. Washington. All but the Phoenix/Third Avenue were advertised in the December 26, 1911 Republican.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lamara Theatre on Jan 20, 2015 at 7:27 pm

I’m sure the book got the address wrong. I’ve found a reference to the Lamara Theatre being very near Donofrio’s, a confectionery and ice cream parlor, and Donofrio’s was at 21 E. Washington (the candy factory on the Sanborn map.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gaiety Theatre on Jan 20, 2015 at 6:37 pm

The June 13, 1914, issue of The American Contractor said that the general contract for construction of the Gaiety Theatre on Weybosset Street, Providence, had been awarded to Famigliette Bros.. The project was designed by William R. Walker & Son.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Montlake Theater on Jan 20, 2015 at 4:47 pm

The address 2410 East Lynn Street is actually the back wall of the theater’s auditorium. The theater’s entrance was through that splendid Gothic arch at 2308 24th Avenue East.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Montlake Theater on Jan 20, 2015 at 4:33 pm

This item from the September 13, 1924, issue of Exhibitor’s Trade Review is probably about the Montlake Theatre:

“W. W. Armstrong, is building a house at 24th Avenue and East Lynn Street, Seattle. It is planned to seat 580 people. Construction will begin shortly. George Purvis of Seattle is architect.”
George B. Purvis also designed the Columbia Theatre in Longview and the Mack Theatre in Port Angeles, Washington.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lamara Theatre on Jan 20, 2015 at 3:27 pm

A nocturnal photo of the Lamara Theatre appears at the top of page 85 of Vanishing Phoenix, by Robert A. Melikian (Google Books preview.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Riviera Theater on Jan 20, 2015 at 1:17 pm

The Riviera Theatre last operated in the building that was built in 1924 as the Liberty Theatre. This photo from the 1920s shows part of the theater at far right, and the L in the name Liberty can just be made out on the sign above the marquee.

This photo from the 1940s shows the Riviera just down the block, and it’s clearly the same building the Liberty was in in the 1920s photo.

If there was a Riviera Theatre in Sumner in 1911, the only explanation I can think of is that the original Riviera was closed sometime before the 1940s photo was made and the name was moved to the Liberty building. However, the only theater I’ve found mentioned at Sumner in early trade journals is a house called the Sumner Theatre, in operation by 1916 and still operating in 1922. I haven’t found William Nasmyth mentioned in any of the early trade journals, either.