Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pavilions at Talking Stick on Dec 18, 2017 at 5:50 pm

The renovation of this multiplex for UltraStar Cinemas in 2010 was designed by Phoenix architectural firm Level 4 Studio (now defunct.) The original building was entirely gutted and rebuilt with stadium seating. The project had six all-ages theaters, the largest seating 250, plus five smaller screens seating 30 to 40 adults, and in these beer, wine, and food service were available.

The project also featured a cinema café . The total seating capacity was close to 1,600, according to this article in Film Journal.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about AMC Ritz 13 on Dec 18, 2017 at 5:28 pm

The three-screen expansion of this multiplex for Carmike Cinemas in 2010 was accompanied by a complete renovation of the existing theaters. The project was designed by the Chattanooga-based architectural firm Artech Design Group.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ovation Cinema Grill on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:50 pm

The remodeling of this multiplex for Carmike Cinemas was designed by the Chattanooga-based architectural firm Artech Design Group. A few photos of the theater can be seen on this page at the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about AMC Cherry Blossom 14 on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:46 pm

The Cherry Blossom 14 was designed for Carmike Cinemas by the Chattanooga-based firm Artech Design Group (formerly Artech Design Company.) Several photos of the theater can be seen on this page of the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Boulevard 10 on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:42 pm

Additional photos of the Boulevard 10 can be found on this page at the web site of the architects, now called Artech Design Group.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about AMC Albuquerque 12 on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:35 pm

This multiplex was designed for Carmike Cinemas by the Chattanooga-based firm Artech Design Group. This project is not featured on their web site, but three photos can be seen on the web site of the builders, Wilger Enterprises.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rio Rancho Premiere on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:22 pm

Rio Rancho Premier was designed by the Albuquerque based firm Modulus Architects. There is one picture of the project on the firm’s web site, but the web site of the builders, Wilger Enterprises, features four pictures.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dixie Theatre on Dec 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm

A history of the B. C. Howell family on this web page says that prior to opening the Howell Theatre in 1928 Mr. Howell had for many years had at least two theaters operating in Coleman at any given time, including the Dixie and a house called the Gem. Mr. Howell’s first theatrical venture in the town had been the Howell Opera House, which was in operation by 1904.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Howell Theatre on Dec 18, 2017 at 3:45 pm

This article about the B. C. Howell family says that the Howell Theatre in Coleman opened on October 8, 1928. The building was partly destroyed by a fire in 1967 and subsequently demolished. The family had sold the theater in 1945.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Queen Theatre on Dec 18, 2017 at 2:38 pm

The March 4, 1937, issue of the Big Spring Daily Herald had an article about the re-opening of Robb & Rowley’s remodeled and expanded Queen Theatre, which was to take place the following day. It said that the Queen had originally opened on November 29, 1924, and had now been remodeled twice.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ritz Theater on Dec 18, 2017 at 2:20 pm

The October 29, 1933, issue of the Big Spring Daily Herald said that Robb & Rowley’s Ritz Theatre would celebrate its 5th anniversary week from October 29 through November 5. Unfortunately, issues of the newspaper from 1928, the year the Ritz opened, are not yet available online.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dona-Lin Drive-In on Dec 18, 2017 at 1:50 pm

The September 19, 1953, issue of Boxoffice reported that the 300-car drive-in theater that Mr. and Mrs. Percy Bond had under construction on Highway 80 east of Loraine would be called the Dona-Lin, named for their only grandchildren, Donna Jan and Ray Lynn Beights.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Texan Theater on Dec 18, 2017 at 1:41 pm

Linkrot repair: The September 19, 1953, Boxoffice article about Will Horwitz and the Texan Theatre, to which Gerald A. DeLuca linked on June 27, 2010, can now be found at this link. It notes that the last movies at the Texan had been shown on September 8. The theater was still successful, but had lost its lease. It was demolished to make way for the new home of the Houston Club.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Crown Theatre on Dec 17, 2017 at 4:56 pm

The Lyric must have become the Utah in 1938. This brief item is from the “Theater Changes” section of The Film Daily of October 7, 1938:

“UTAH

“Price — Utah (formerly Lyric); Work Planned: New marquee, ventilating system, etc.; Owner: Nick Salevurakis.”

Nick Salevurakis owned the Lyric in the 1920s, but sold it around the end of 1926 and must have bought it back later. This item is from the January 4, 1927, issue of Exhibtors Daily Review:
“The Star and Lyric Theatres of Price, Utah, have been purchased by Mr. Littlejohn, the Lyric having been owned by Nick Salevurakis and the Star by Georgeites Bros.”
At the end of the 1930s the Utah became part of the Huish circuit, as noted in this item from Boxoffice January 6, 1940:
“NICK SALEVURAKIS, former exhibitor of Price, Utah, died of pneumonia last week. He recently sold his theatre interests to the Huish circuit.”
I’ve been unable to find anything in the trade journals about the theaters in Price after 1940, until an item in the July 7, 1975, issue of Boxoffice said that as of July 1, the Price and Crown Theatres and the Motor Vu Drive-In had been owned and operated by Stan Dewsnup and Wesley Webb.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ozark Theatre on Dec 16, 2017 at 11:42 pm

From the mid-1920s until 1946, the Ozark Theatre was operated by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ruh.

This undated photo shows a wedding party posed in front of the Ozark Theatre.

The theater building is in the more distant background in this photo, which was probably taken quite a bit earlier than the wedding photo. This might have been taken before the building was converted into a theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Jewel Theatre on Dec 15, 2017 at 8:56 pm

The November 30, 1907, issue of The Moving Picture World had this brief announcement about the Jewel Theatre:

“The Jewel, a handsome little theater, opened on November 14 in Fremont, Ohio, and is doing good business.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Queens Theatre on Dec 15, 2017 at 5:52 pm

A disturbing incident took place at the Queens Airdome in 1925, as related in the July 4 issue of Motion Picture News:

“Saturday night Miss Marian Collins, cashier of the Queens Airdome, Maffitt and Marcus avenues, dreamed that she had been held up. Her nerves were upset by the many similar robberies in recent weeks. On Sunday night, June 14, her dream came true when four armed men, all young and roughly dressed and holding handkerchiefs over their faces rushed into the airdome. They robbed Miss Collins of $273.

“When Miss Collins sought to appease the bandits with some small change one of them forced her to open the door of her cage so they could obtain all the cash in sight. So quickly did the quartette work, Manager Tom Curley who was conversing with a patron a short distance away was unaware that a robbery was in progress.”

The article noted recent robberies at these other St. Louis houses: the Liberty Music Hall on Delmar Boulevard, the Compton Airdome on Easton Avenue, and the Arcade Airdome.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbia Theater on Dec 15, 2017 at 3:00 pm

This item from the July 4, 1925, issue of Motion Picture News might be about the Columbia Theatre, though the location gives a street name that doesn’t exist now:

“George Skouras has had plans prepared by Preston J. Bradshaw, architect, International Life Building, for a $100,000 motion picture theatre building at Southwest and Midwest avenues, St. Louis.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Towne Theatre on Dec 15, 2017 at 2:11 pm

Here is an item from the May 27, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World about the new owner of the Ritz Theatre and his plans for the house. The house had reopened as the Royal on May 7.

“CORNELIUS BUYS THE RITZ. Theater on Sixth and Olive Will be Called the Royal.

“St. Louis, Mo.—J. W. Cornelius, proprietor and manager of the two Lyric theaters and the Lyric Skydome, has added another theater to his string of amusement houses. The Ritz, on Sixth near Olive street, has just passed into the Cornelius management, and opened on Sunday, May 7. The name of the theater has been changed to Royal, and will be known as the downtown home of Paramount pictures, with the price of admission ten and twenty cents.

“The house, which is practically new, has been closed for the past two weeks, undergoing a general brightening up with paint and decorations, and some attractive hangings. One of the finest orchestras in the city, composed of seven pieces with harp and organ accompaniment furnishes the music for the entertainment. The same brand of efficiency prevails at the Royal that has made the Lyric theaters noted for the high quality of their programs, and the excellent deportment of the attendants.

“All the houses under the Cornelius management run with a smoothness and watchful care of detail that speaks for a high degree of study and thought on the business on operating a theater. Mr. Cornelius was one of the first exhibitors in St. Louis to put on high class films In his theaters, and to cater to the better class of patrons. All his houses enjoy a regular clientele of patrons who go to see each bill as it is put on, and the downtown Lyric, which changes program every day, has perhaps the greatest number of these regular patrons.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Fox Compton Theatre on Dec 14, 2017 at 9:36 pm

The January 20, 1934, issue of Pacific Constructor had an item about a theater to be built on the site the Fox later occupied:

“PREPARING PLANS.

“COMPTON, Los Angeles Co., Cal.– W. Allen, 1008 Washington Bldg., Los Angeles, is preparing plans for a theater building to be built at 134 East Compton Blvd., Compton, for August Frankl, Sunset Theatres Co., lessee. The structure will have a seating capacity of 800 and will contain stores and offices. Reinforced concrete construction, composition roofing, concrete floors, structural steel, plate glass, etc.”

A 618-seat house called the Compton Theatre is listed in the 1935 FDY, but was not yet listed as a Fox house. The Compton was most likely a replacement for the Symphony Theatre a few blocks away, which had been destroyed in the 1933 earthquake.

The architect W. Allen was probably William Allen, who was active during this period. He designed a number of civic buildings for the nearby city of South Gate, and the Streamline/Deco Burbank City Hall, probably his best known work, in partnership with architect W. George Lutzi. I haven’t been able to determine if the partnership had been formed by 1934.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theater on Dec 14, 2017 at 8:51 pm

Thanks for the correction on the architect, chronicler. I was able to find that King also designed the Strand Theatre in Alameda.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Dec 14, 2017 at 8:47 pm

The December, 1917, issue of The Architect & Engineer had this item about a theater project in Alameda which was most likely the Strand:

“Alameda Theatre

“Mr. George F. King, Berkeley architect, has prepared plans for a Class ‘C’ theatre of 1500 persons capacity for Mr. James Hamblen. Construction has already started, the site being on Park street, near Encinal avenue. The building is to cost $75,000.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Atheneum & Masonic Hall on Dec 14, 2017 at 8:21 pm

About two thirds of the way down this web page is a piece about the Atheneum, and a photo. The building looks like it might have been converted from a church, and was wood-framed and shingled.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about La Tosca Theatre on Dec 14, 2017 at 8:03 pm

The current Google street view shows that La Tosca has now been demolished. The theater and adjacent buildings have been replaced by an apartment complex, a photo of which can be seen at the top of this web page.

As the apartments have already begun leasing, the demolition of the theater must have taken place quite some time ago, perhaps more than a year, but I haven’t been able to find out anything about the event on the Internet. I guess L.A.’s news media just weren’t interested.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Elmwood Theatre on Dec 14, 2017 at 11:04 am

chronicler: Thanks for the response and additional information. The mis-attribution of some of Dufour’s work to Cornelius has me wondering if the Rialto Theatre (first Alameda Theatre) in Alameda might also be mis-attributed. Cinema Treasures lists Cornelius as the architect of the Rialto, but the facade bears a strong resemblance to the Elmwood’s, and I can easily picture them being the work of the same designer.

There is a scan of an architect’s sketch of the Alameda on the Rialto’s photo page, but it has no name on it, nor is the source of the photo given, though it is probably from either a theater trade journal or one of the architectural journals of the period. I’ll see if I can find it on the Internet.