Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 151 - 175 of 9,021 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Jul 28, 2014 at 8:06 pm

The Liberty Theatre in McKeesport was in operation by 1921, when it was mentioned in the September 10 issue of Exhibitor’s Trade Review.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Star Theater on Jul 28, 2014 at 7:08 pm

There were two houses called the Altmeyer Theatre in McKeesport. The first was a 1,600-seat house on Fifth Avenue at Strawberry Street, which was dedicated in December, 1892, and destroyed by a fire in February, 1896.

The second Altmeyer Theatre was on the north side of Fifth Avenue almost opposite the end of Blackberry Street. This was a former saloon which was converted into a theater. By 1908 it was being operated by J. P. Harris. It was listed in the 1913-1914 Cahn guide as a ground floor house with 640 seats in the orchestra, 210 in the balcony, a gallery accommodating 300 and boxes for 50.

In later years the second Altmeyer Theatre was renamed the Harris State Theatre. It was later converted into a department store. This probably happened before 1930. When Warner Brothers took over 17 Harris theaters in the region in 1930, the only McKeesport houses listed as part of the deal were the J. P. Harris Memorial Theatre and a house called the Harris Walnut Street Theatre.

There might have been a 200-seat house called the Star Theatre in McKeesport, but if there was it was definitely not the former Altmeyer Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rialto Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 5:09 pm

A 1920 Worcester City Directory lists the Bijou Theatre at 24 Millbury Street and the Rialto Theatre at 37 Millbury Street (the Rialto’s building occupies multiple lots.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 3:58 pm

Whoever wrote the text with those photos must have confused the Alhambra with the Doric Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bijou Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 12:18 pm

The July, 1911, issue of a magazine called New Boston featured a brief article with an encomium for B. F. Keith’s Bijou Theatre:

“During the month of June hundreds of visiting social workers, interested in the dangers and possibilities of the moving picture show, will be in Boston attending the various meetings of a half dozen or more charities conferences. In order to show these visitors the possibilities in the development of a moving picture theater, Mrs. Josephine Clement, the manager of B. F. Keith’s Bijou Theater, has arranged a program of special interest for the week of June 7-14. The two and one-half hour entertainment will consist of motion pictures, musical numbers, and the one act play or opera that are parts of the regular program, and will include also specially arranged illustrated talks on topics of social and civic interest, prepared by a local conference committee. A visit to the Bijou will illustrate how the liberality and broad-mindedness of Mr. Keith have raised the ordinary moving picture show to the level of refined entertainment without sacrificing life and sparkle to ‘uplift.’

“The Bijou Theater is not an educational institution in any sense of the word; its sole purpose is to amuse. The management believes, however, that a motion picture entertainment may be made both interesting and diverting without depicting the antics of hoodlums or the tawdry sentiment of the dime novel. During the past three years, the entire program at the Bijou has been developed from material supplied directly to the management, no agents having been employed.

“The regular program of motion pictures — always with one educational film — is varied by ten minute, illustrated, camera chats, one act dramas presented by the Bijou players, stereopticon views of subjects of contemporary interest, and high grade vocal and instrumental music. As a sample of the best development of the motion picture theater, visitors to Boston should not neglect the Bijou.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Art Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 12:03 pm

Given it’s 1917 opening and its original name of Alhambra Theatre, this house must be the project noted in the March 11, 1916, issue of The American Contractor:

“Theater: $60,000. 2 sty. Quincy, Mass. Archt. E. W. Campbell, 5 Park square, Boston. Owners Alhambra Theater, Inc., care archts. Archt. will take bids after Mar. 13. Brk., re. conc, struct. & orn. iron, gravel rfg.”
I haven’t been able to discover much about E. W. Campbell, but the July, 1911, issue of a magazine called New Boston features an ad for the Atlantic Decorating Company at 5 Park Square, E. W. Campbell General Manager, which boasts that they are “Architects and Constructors of All the Noted Shows in Boston.” I don’t know if by “shows” they meant theaters or not. I did find one reference to Campbell having designed a display for an auto show in Detroit, so maybe the firm specialized in trade shows.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Paramount Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 11:19 am

The Paramount was most likely this theater project noted in the September 22, 1921, issue of Engineering News-Record

:“Newton (Boston P. O.)—Theater—Newton Theater Co., 415 Center St.. let contract building 2 story, 70 x 153 ft., concrete and steel, rein.-con. flooring, concrete foundation, on Washington and Beacon Sts., here, to T. L. Goodwin. Newton Highlands. About $150,000.”
“Beacon” was an obvious typo for Bacon Street. An item in the July 28 issue of the same publication had said that plans for a theater on Washington Street for the Newton Theater Company were begin prepared by the Boston firm of Desmond & Lord. George Henri Desmond was also the architect of the Portland Theatre in Portland, Maine. The firm also drew plans for a large theater in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1922, but I haven’t yet been able to identify it, assuming it was completed.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Portland Theater on Jul 28, 2014 at 11:07 am

The Maine Historical Society has drawings of the New Portland Theatre by the architect, George Henri Desmond, of the Boston firm of Desmond & Lord. The drawings are not digitized, but the collection of which they are part is open for research according to Archive Grid.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dreamland Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 9:47 am

The March 3, 1917, issue of The Moving Picture World has an article about the recent sale of the Dreamland Theatre, which mentions a few other theaters in McKeesport and the surrounding area:

“DREAMLAND AT McKEESPORT, PA., SOLD.

“One of the most important transactions that has taken place in amusement circles of McKeesport, Pa., in some time, was closed February 10, when the Dreamland theater was purchased by Frank Panopolis and George Lambru, well-known exhibitors, from A. H. Berg, of the McKeesport Amusement Company. The Dreamland has been closed for the purpose of remodeling by the new owners. It is hoped to have the work completed for reopening by March 1. Mr. Berg, who has achieved much success as an exhibitor for the past seven years, still conducts three up-to-date picture houses, the Altmeyer and Orpheum theaters in McKeesport and the Avenue theater at Duquesne, Pa. The firm of Panopolis and Lambru owns and operates the Lyric theater, a handsome thousand-seat house, at 515 Fifth avenue, McKeesport, of which Mr. Panopolis is manager. He will also manage their latest acquisition, the Dreamland, and having shown the latest and best film productions with much success in the past at the Lyric he plans to set a high standard in every respect.”

A McKeesport vaudeville house called the Dreamland Theatre is mentioned in Variety, The Billboard, and The New York Clipper as early as 1907. It was probably this theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Jul 28, 2014 at 9:19 am

The Capitol Theatre was in operation by 1917 under the name Lyric Theatre. It was mentioned in an article about the recent sale of the Dreamland Theatre in McKeesport to Frank Panopolis and George Lambru, operators of the Lyric. The article appeared in the March 3, 1917, issue of The Moving Picture World.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Town Theatre on Jul 27, 2014 at 1:20 pm

The Orpheum Theater in East Helena was mentioned in the November 7, 1938, issue of the Helena Independent. It was also mentioned in the May 22, 1932, issue, and quite a few times in the 1920s.

I’ve found the Town Theatre mentioned in the Independent-Record as early as July 13, 1947, and as late as December 28, 1958.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pix Theatre on Jul 27, 2014 at 11:01 am

I’ve looked up and down Front Street and can’t find any buildings that resemble the Pix Theatre in this photo. There’s no trace of the two neighboring buildings either. I suspect that the Pix has been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pix Theatre on Jul 27, 2014 at 10:45 am

The Pix Theatre in Drummond was advertised in the November 17, 1939, issue of The Philipsburg Mail. Two different single feature programs were advertised for Saturday and Sunday, and a double feature was advertised for the following Wednesday.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Jul 26, 2014 at 9:57 pm

Two more photos of the Alhambra Theatre, these dated 1913:

The auditorium

The front

The text with these gives the address as 5715 Grand Avenue. I don’t know if that’s a mistake or if Central Avenue was actually called Grand Avenue in 1913.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Jul 26, 2014 at 7:50 pm

Here is a photo showing the Alhambra Theatre, Duluth, ca.1928, from the Minnesota Digital Library.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Garrick Theatre on Jul 26, 2014 at 7:26 pm

Street View has indeed been set in the wrong place. The Garrick Theatre was on the east side of 2nd Avenue on the north corner of the alley between Superior and 1st Streets.

Here is one of the photos from the Liebenberg & Kaplan collection that ThomJP referred to in an earlier comment. It is dated 1940, which must be when the firm worked on the theater. This was the facade after the firm redesigned it. Click on the name Garrick in the description on either page to see several more photos from both before and after the alterations.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colonial Theatre on Jul 26, 2014 at 12:42 pm

The “New England Notes” column in the November 5, 1910, issue of The Moving Picture World had this item:

“The Colonial Theater opened Wednesday, October 12, at Lowell, Mass., with James L. Barton in charge. Pictures and vaudeville are offered; admission, 10 cents.”
The November 26 issue of the same publication said that the Colonial Theatre was doing good business with pictures, songs, and vaudeville, and described it as “…a neat, cosy house with good all around facilities for business.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Orpheum Theatre on Jul 26, 2014 at 10:30 am

A capsule review of a movie called The Shepard of the Hills was written by I. A. Iverson of the Electric Theatre in Cut Bank, Montana, and published in the January 7, 1922, issue of Exhibitors Herald.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Community Drive-In on Jul 25, 2014 at 12:58 pm

The Community Drive-In was first listed in the FDY in 1948. By 1954, five drive-ins were listed for Topeka.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Theatre on Jul 24, 2014 at 12:44 pm

This house has always been the Grand Theatre, and still operates under that name. It was the former Snyder Theatre, at 312 Main Street, that was called the Main Street Cinema 1 & 2. The confusion has probably arisen from the fact that T & J Agnes Theatres Inc., operators of the Grand, has its office in the old Snyder Theatre/Main Street Cinema building. This has led some movie listing sites (Fandango and Moviefone among them) to mistakenly list the Grand at 312 Main Street, but Cinema Treasures is the only site I’ve found that mistakenly lists the Grand as the Main Street Cinema. We’ve got the address right but the name wrong.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cine-Mex Theatre on Jul 24, 2014 at 12:40 pm

I wonder how long the dickish judge managed to keep his theater open with that draconian policy? It’s not as though a farm town like Indio would be full of people eager to avoid children and snacks, or to pay extra when they took their kids to a movie.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Jul 24, 2014 at 12:17 pm

dickneeds111: The Palace is the oldest surviving theater built for the Orpheum Vaudeville circuit. The description could use clarification on that point as there had been quite a few theaters called the Orpheum before the circuit was launched from the Orpheum Theatre in San Francisco, which was opened by Gustav Walter in 1886. Most of those other Orpheums, like the one in Boston, were never part of the Orpheum circuit or its successors, KAO (Keith-Albee-Orpheum) and RKO (Radio-Keith-Orpheum.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Main Street Cinemas 1 & 2 on Jul 24, 2014 at 11:26 am

I believe I’ve also solved the puzzle of the dueling addresses for the Grand Theatre. 312 Main Street is the correct address of the Snyder Theatre (it’s across the street from Joan’s Hallmark at 311 Main) but 312 is also the address of T & J Agnes Theatres Inc., owners of the Grand Theatre. The Agneses obviously must own both the Snyder and the Grand, and their offices are in the Snyder building.

There are multiple references on the Internet to the Main Street Cinema 1 & 2 at 312 Main Street, and most Internet listings for the Grand Theatre give its address as 211 Main Street. A few listings have the Grand at 312 (Fandango and Moviefone, for example) but I’ve found only one web site listing the Main Street Cinema at 211 Main, and it’s Cinema Treasures.

Apparently both theaters have been operating within recent years, the Grand under its original name and the Snyder as the Main Street Cinema 1 & 2. Movie web sites currently have listings only for the Grand, so we can list this theater as Main Street Cinema 1 & 2, 312 Main Street, Closed, with the aka Snyder Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Main Street Cinemas 1 & 2 on Jul 24, 2014 at 10:14 am

This photo of the Snyder Theatre with “Watch For Our Grand Opening Coming Soon” on its marquee is dated November 11, 1949. It surely must have opened before the end of that year.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pollock Theatre on Jul 23, 2014 at 10:08 pm

It should work the same for everybody, but what I get is this, which is the same spot in North Dakota that we’re getting on the map on this page.