Gold Theater

176 Sands Street,
Brooklyn, NY 11201

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johndereszewski
johndereszewski on September 18, 2011 at 4:28 pm

The Gold Theatre site is now situated within the confines of the Farragut Public Housing Project. This was – and remains – a pretty gritty neighborhood, though one which is situated in close proximity to Brooklyn Heights and the (now) up and coming DUMBO and Vinnneger Hill neighborhoods …. Except for identifying a William Winters as the theater’s architect, providing a 1927 – 1953 operating period and confirming the identity of the Kilgen organ the Brooklyn Theatre Index offers no additional information about the Gold. 

Maria57
Maria57 on September 18, 2011 at 12:45 pm

I have 2 dish sets that my grandmother collected from the Gold Theater back in the 40’s. One has a farm scene on it and the other is red glass with cut flower petals. Do you have any information about them?

jflundy
jflundy on January 29, 2011 at 10:22 am

I recall going past the Gold on a Flushing Avenue Trolley Bus around 1950-51. That is a great photo shown above but it does not look much like the theatre I saw. That vertical was not there and as I recall there was a Candy Store or Luncheonette store front built into the corner of the building. There was a marquee that looked like it was from the 30’s that i think wrapped around the corner of the building on both Sand and Gold. Perhaps Kilt can comment on this

keltym
keltym on January 29, 2011 at 8:55 am

the Gold Theater in Brooklyn on Sand and Gold Sts was owned and operated by my Dad, first with a partner and then independently. He closed it in 1954 (maybe a little earlier) because the theater was to demolished for construction of the Bklyn/Queens Expressway. I worked in the theater as a kid. The corporate name was Mimi Amusement Corp, named for me. It was in a rough neighborhood, one that parents today would be unlikely to let their kids roam. We walked from the Myrtle Ave subway stop and after closing walked to the bank in Bklyn Heights to make the nightly deposit. Admission to the show was .14 for children, .20 for adults. Sailors from the nearby navy yard would pay their admission with a $100 bill. their addmission with

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on August 4, 2010 at 11:42 am

Nice vintage shot Tinseltoes.

cjdv
cjdv on April 4, 2005 at 8:16 pm

Opening date is usually given as 1927 but it may have opened in 26. The FDYB for 1927, 1929, and 1931 give the address as 178 Sands. The 1947 FDYB gives 176 Sands Street. It closed in 1953 and was demolished.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on April 4, 2005 at 4:10 pm

The Film Daily Yearbook’s 1930, 1941 give a seating capacity of 544. The 1943 edition of F.D.Y. has a capacity given as 548.

It is not listed in the 1950 F.D.Y.