Poly Theatre

3001 Vaughn Boulevard,
Fort Worth, TX

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Poly Theatre...Fort Worth Texas

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Found the sad and lonely Poly in a very old section of Fort Worth that had at one time been the town of Polytechnic.

Amazing how so many of these old theaters refuse to go away, (unless they burn or are demolished), as if they are all waiting on something of someone.

Contributed by Don Lewis

Recent comments (view all 7 comments)

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on January 31, 2008 at 5:47 pm

Here are two more depressing photos, taken in 2007:
http://tinyurl.com/26xus9

DonLewis
DonLewis on February 23, 2008 at 7:03 pm

A 2006 photo of the Poly Theater located on the east side of Fort Worth.

johnbmiller
johnbmiller on March 31, 2008 at 11:06 pm

My dad dropped my sister and I off at the Poly theatre every Saturday.The family who owned it in the 50s,ran the theatre like the theatre nazis.They sure kept us all in line and under control.We loved it…good times

Life's Too Short
Life's Too Short on September 29, 2008 at 3:59 pm

Judging by Don’s Feb 23, 2008 posting, the Poly was used as a church before being abandoned.

bertthebudman
bertthebudman on October 25, 2008 at 1:44 pm

I grew up 3blks. from this theater. went there every wknd. in the 70’s. It had an upstairs balcony that you could smoke in and make out with your girl/guy. It was run by an old lady named “Imogene” she had a little white poodle that she carried everywhere with her. Mean old lady! Lots of memories.

DonLewis
DonLewis on December 31, 2008 at 11:12 am

“The Poly was built around 1950 by Boyd and Imogene Millican, who also built the 7th Street Theater. They leased the 7th Street to Interstate Theaters, a first-run syndicate. (It could be that they owned and operated a number of other neighborhood theaters in town, since they used a discount card for ages 12-17 honored by the other places.) They personally operated the Poly, open 7 days a week, as a second-run venue. It, along with the Varsity, were located in Southeast Fort Worth, a working-class neighborhood. The Poly’s signature colors were red and green. (The discount card was printed red on green.) The box office was a five-window bay with green venetian blinds with red tapes; the marquee sign’s letters were red and green neon lights. The Millicans appeared to not like children…or anyone else, for that matter…which was an odd circumstance for a family that operated two movie theaters. In retrospect, I suppose they had to be stern since in the 1950s and 1960s families felt comfortable dropping off their kids relatively unsupervised for 3 hours and 45 minutes of two features, coming attractions, and a cartoon. For some reason, I wanted to be there when they opened on Saturday at noon…the box office girl raising the blinds seemed somehow magical. The automatic ticket machine and the teller’s change machine were exotic technology. The concession stand was where I could buy a bag of pop corn for 10 cents and a small coke for 5 cents…admission under 12 was 25 cents, leaving me with 10 cents to call home when I was ready…50 cents was my Saturday "movie money,” left on the dining room table every week. Monday-Friday, the Poly opened at 5:30 p.m. and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Obviously, I spent far too much time there! The Millicans died in the early 2000s, and the 7th Street was razed by distant relatives in order to sell the premier location. The Poly building was sold to a neighborhood church which has since disappeared, and the county tax office has no record as to the owner of the property may now be. I suspect the building will ultimately be condemned and torn down too."

Ouote reprintd with permission of Dan Washmon

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