Egyptian Theatre

229 South Broadway,
Coos Bay, OR 97420

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Showing 25 comments

Trolleyguy
Trolleyguy on June 4, 2014 at 11:13 am

According to the website, grand re-opening is scheduled for Friday, June 20.

Mikeyisirish
Mikeyisirish on June 4, 2014 at 10:54 am

Is it open for business yet?

GKramer
GKramer on March 11, 2013 at 10:23 am

Last week the EPTA held another successful fund-raising event, on their way toward the $200K match to grant money for the $750K goal needed to complete the structural repairs and get the Egyptian back opened for business by 2014. This theatre is in good hands and will come back better than ever. Worth the wait!

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on March 18, 2011 at 9:31 pm

Great picture,chuck.

CSWalczak
CSWalczak on November 16, 2010 at 1:53 pm

This theater will be celebrating its 85th birthday on November 19 and 20, 2010: View link

lavachickie
lavachickie on August 29, 2010 at 12:21 am

Went to the Egyptian tonight to see National Lampoons Vacation. A grant for new lights justcame through and they were testing them tonight! Good to see so much love and work still going into this gem.

JPizzle
JPizzle on December 8, 2009 at 3:54 am

Showing a movie from a DVD is perfectly legal as long as the studios are informed and a “ use fee ” is paid, generally around $200.00 or less depending on the movie in question.
35mm equipment is very expensive and many older films have to be played in a reel-to-reel style which requires 2 projectors.
Considering the cost of a ticket and the vintage of the films being shown a DVD projector is perfectly reasonable.

Evan39
Evan39 on October 13, 2007 at 9:47 pm

Demoliton has begun on the two mini-theaters that take up the balcony of theater with the goal of returning the Egyptian to a theater with a usable balcony which would add about 300 more seats. Work is being done by inmates from the Shutter Creek Correctional Facility.

Simon Overton
Simon Overton on July 28, 2007 at 1:54 pm

Is there any hopeful news of a reopening…soon?

marbmr3
marbmr3 on October 30, 2006 at 2:19 pm

I went to the Cleopatra showing on Sunday, it was wonderful to be back in the theater! Also to see Lee on the pipe organ and all for $3. What a deal! Maybe some old silent movies along with the organ would bring back a few memories and maybe a few new ones!

KenLayton
KenLayton on October 27, 2006 at 3:30 pm

Why didn’t they go with professional 35mm projection equipment? Projecting home video DVD’s is copyright infringement. I hope they make it clear in their advertising that they are not projecting films, but rather they are showing videos.

windyweather
windyweather on October 27, 2006 at 11:48 am

The Egyptian is open now and is having a first showing on 27 Oct 2006.
They have a new DVD projector and will be showing films that are at least 5 years old.
The film this evening is Young Frankenstein by Mel Brooks.
http://www.egyptian-theatre.com/

Enjoy
ww

Evan39
Evan39 on August 8, 2006 at 1:37 pm

The Friends of the Egyptian Theater and the City of Coos Bay have re-lit the Egyptian Theater. It had gone dark after it was closed but it’s coming back to life! They have held several fundraisers in an effort to revive the now city owned theater. Downtown Coos Bay looks much better now.

KenLayton
KenLayton on January 10, 2006 at 9:38 am

Well, Coming Attractions is attempting to come into the already fine Centralia-Chehalis, Washington market to ruin my friend Daryl Lund’s wonderfully restored single screen Chehalis Theater (featuring top-notch projection & sound) and the stadium seating Yardbirds 3 Theater by opening a 10 plex. Daryl has spent lots of his own money restoring, upgrading, and modernizing both theaters. The Chehalis was an old Tom Moyer theater that was run down and had closed in the early 80’s. The Yardbirds theater was a dump that was run into the ground by Regal Cinemas. Daryl took it over and completely redid everything there and converted the auditoriums into stadium seating. There’s also a wonderfully run McMenamins theater called the Olympic Club in Centralia. Now Coming Attractions wants to build a 10 plex here and destroy the business of these already fine theaters. A 10 plex would be way too many screens here. Even here in Olympia we are going to have way too many screens. Presently we have a new 16 plex run by Regal that opened back in August. Now we are adding a 14 plex from Century Theaters and an independent 12 plex from the Cafarro Company.

CoosBayMovieGoer
CoosBayMovieGoer on January 10, 2006 at 2:50 am

first run films, that opened to the Egyptian, many weeks after they had, to the Pony, to see if it truly was a loyalty issue. These films did more business at the Pony, in their last legs of their runs, then they did at the Egyptian.

Now the city comes along and offers to purchase the theatre, from CA, for what is half of what is owed on the property. Could you sell your home for $400k when you owe $800k? Not likely.

In closing, I’d like to add that the expansion of the Pony added 25 jobs, and with the Egyptian closing, no jobs were lost. CA didn’t take the high road and simply lay people off.

So, don’t buy the hype, and don’t believe the one sided reporting of the local rag, The World newspaper. There are two sides to every story, and its time that we as the residents actually take a long look in the mirror at the REAL reason the Egyptian closed..because WE stopped going. You don’t see empty restaurants staying in business very long, and when you can’t even cover ½ of your operational costs, you don’t have much a choice. Regal Cinemas used to operate both Cinemas, spent NOTHING on them, and then ran for more money in the big cities. I think its time we actually appreciate what is being done by CA…bringing the first run big screen to the small areas of Oregon, that no one else would touch.

CoosBayMovieGoer
CoosBayMovieGoer on January 10, 2006 at 2:43 am

the distributors happy, and the patrons too. The studios were not happy with only being able to play 7 screens between the two cities, Coos Bay and North Bend. As CA couldn’t expand the Egyptian, there was no choice but to expand the Pony. Even after, CA tried to play first run films, first run art films, and late run films at the Egyptian. The public didn’t come to the Egyptian anymore! I attended a showing of the Robert Redford film, an Unfinished Life, when it opened at the Egyptian. In addition to me and my companion, there were 2 other people in the house! Plus, and to unfortunately be blunt, the local peoples of the region on the majority lack the sophistication to desire to see art films. CA then even moved films

CoosBayMovieGoer
CoosBayMovieGoer on January 10, 2006 at 2:39 am

Secondly, his claim that CA should have “just taken better care” of the Egyptian is misleading. The Egyptian is a historical landmark, which means that you must have any changes of any type approved, and any changes that would alter the state of the location at the time of its historial inception would not have been approved. A good example of this is that the theatre was not fully handicapped accessible, with all restrooms being upstairs. CA attempted to get an o.k. to install downstairs bathrooms but this was turned down.

Thirdly, the movie business is very competitive. To continue to bring first run films to small and medium markets in Oregon, CA must keep

CoosBayMovieGoer
CoosBayMovieGoer on January 10, 2006 at 2:36 am

Id like to respond to Ken Laytons comments above. I apologize in advance for the length of the postings, but it is necessary for completeness.

First of all, Mr Laytons statements with regard to the Aberdeen Theatre are false. Aside from the fact that Coming Attractions didn’t build it as he claims, the theatre is doing very well, and the company recently extended its lease at that property. I’d like to add that if not for CA coming in and keeping that theatre opened, the entire mall complex where the theatre is located would have gone under, thereby costing around 200 jobs to the local economy.

Evan39
Evan39 on December 3, 2005 at 1:45 pm

The Egyptian Theater was the heart and soul of downtown Coos Bay. When it closed permanently as a movie theater on Sunday, November 27, after 80 years in business it hurt the area and the residents. Let’s hope the plans for the City of Coos Bay to buy it and in conjunction with the Little Theater on the Bay run it as a live venue work out.

KenLayton
KenLayton on November 30, 2005 at 8:14 am

“Coming Distractions” theatres sure throws away money. They built that 10 screen crap-plex (South Shore) in Aberdeen, Wash. that’s just barely staying open. That area cannot support that many screens plus all the jobs being lost there due to two large lumber mills closing now. So now they throw up an 11 screen in Coos Bay. Are they crazy? They’ll never make it —– too many screens in that area. They should have kept the Egyptian and taken better care of it.

Evan39
Evan39 on November 12, 2005 at 11:09 am

The Egyptian Theater main floor is no longer the place where the biggest movies open in Oregon’s Bay Area. The company which owns it recently opened an 11 theater multiplex at the Pony Village Mall where they showcase the more popular movies. The Egyptian has been showing art and foreign movies among others lately. There has been talk by the Little Theater on the Bay group of the City of Coos Bay buying the Egyptian and then leasing it to the theater group. The Egyptian would then be a live concert venue rather than a movie theater.

Patsy
Patsy on February 19, 2005 at 10:52 pm

“…..this classic Egyptian theater still has its original 10-rank Wurlitzer organ…..” Now that quote is really saying something!

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on December 21, 2004 at 5:40 pm

The Egyptian Theatre opened on 19th November 1925. It was designed by architect Lee Arden Thomas and had a seating capacity of 1,450.

stefoscope
stefoscope on December 10, 2004 at 5:37 pm

This is one of the quirkiest and coolest theatres I have had the pleasure of visiting. Although the Egyptian motif is understandably 1920s (when the theatre was built), the look has a 1950s retro feel. I’m sure they have repainted over the years. Both stairwells in the lobby feature large seated pharaohs staring out to all the patrons entering, and above the lobby is a banner stating (I believe) “Through these doors pass the most wonderful people”. Colorful Egyptian decorations are placed about the concession stand. The auditorium continues the theme with two large columns forming the proscenium on either side of the stage, with hieroglyphic type illustrations along the walls. The original (main) auditorium features a nice, large screen. The upstairs “balcony” theaters are somewhat smaller, and plainer.

The is definately one of the nicer, more charming neighborhood theatres I’ve seen, and it carries a really great, warm feel to it. The marquee outside is massive, and it has one of the most impressive vertical/roof signs, with the profile of a pharaoh. It’s a fantastic example of neon, and looks wonderful when lit at night.

JimRankin
JimRankin on April 8, 2004 at 1:17 pm

For those who love the Egyptian style, there are a number of theatres that have had that theme, and an entire special issue of “Marquee” magazine was devoted to them in their issue of: Vol. 29, #3; Third Qtr. 1997, and the issue features wonderful color covers of the EGYPTIANS in Milwaukee (in the form of a wonderful color painting by artist Mark Hylton of Columbus, OH) and Ogden Ut. The table of such themed theatres includes 45 examples of those now, or at one time, with us. An introduction and Prologue carry one to those ancient days, and individual articles on the Ogden and Hollywood help detail the existing examples. Many other photos are included.
PHOTOS AVAILABLE:
To obtain any available Back Issue of either “Marquee” or of its ANNUALS, simply go to the web site of the THEATRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA at:
www.HistoricTheatres.org
and notice on their first page the link “PUBLICATIONS: Back Issues List” and click on that and you will be taken to their listing where they also give ordering details. The “Marquee” magazine is 8-1/2x11 inches tall (‘portrait’) format, and the ANNUALS are also soft cover in the same size, but in the long (‘landscape’) format, and are anywhere from 26 to 40 pages. Should they indicate that a publication is Out Of Print, then it may still be possible to view it via Inter-Library Loan where you go to the librarian at any public or school library and ask them to locate which library has the item by using the Union List of Serials, and your library can then ask the other library to loan it to them for you to read or photocopy. [Photocopies of most THSA publications are available from University Microforms International (UMI), but their prices are exorbitant.]

Note: Most any photo in any of their publications may be had in large size by purchase; see their ARCHIVE link. You should realize that there was no color still photography in the 1920s, so few theatres were seen in color at that time except by means of hand tinted renderings or post cards, thus all the antique photos from the Society will be in black and white, but it is quite possible that the Society has later color images available; it is best to inquire of them.

Should you not be able to contact them via their web site, you may also contact their Executive Director via E-mail at:
Or you may reach them via phone or snail mail at:
Theatre Historical Soc. of America
152 N. York, 2nd Floor York Theatre Bldg.
Elmhurst, ILL. 60126-2806 (they are about 15 miles west of Chicago)

Phone: 630-782-1800 or via FAX at: 630-782-1802 (Monday through Friday, 9AM—4PM, CT)