Mayfair Theatre

508 North Howard Street,
Baltimore, MD 21201

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randytheicon
randytheicon on October 16, 2014 at 4:46 pm

zenith82: The problem with Howard Street can be tied to one person: real-estate mogul “Honolulu” Harry Weinberg. He owned most of the property in downtown, but refused to develop it or even lease it to businesses. The buildings deteriorated. However, the city was afraid to press him, because it was known that he planned to bequeath his vast wealth to many hospitals. Nearly every medical center in Baltimore has a “Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Building.”

After Weinberg’s death, his estate held up the much-ballyhooed Westside development project, because they wanted their own developer instead of the one chosen by the city.

John Bennaman.
John Bennaman. on March 4, 2014 at 4:24 pm

I recently heard that the Maryland Historical Society informed that it became a Maryland Historic Landmark, but still no talk of restoration planned yet

zenith82
zenith82 on March 4, 2014 at 4:10 pm

This is another one I drive past every day shaking my head and asking myself why. I recently saw a picture of Howard Street taken in 1982 that showed every building occupied and a lot of people on the sidewalks doing their Christmas shopping. Those of you who live in or near Baltimore know that Howard Street now has a post-apocalyptic look to it, all thanks to local mismanagement.

Even though the roof is gone and the interior is totally trashed by 15 years of exposure to the elements, the walls and facade of this theater look like they might can still be saved. The later marquee that still hangs above the entrance obscures some of the original detail of the building along with the other “improvements” made to the street level over the years. There has been talk of people resurrecting this theater over the past several years, but nothing ever materialized.

John Bennaman.
John Bennaman. on December 15, 2013 at 8:10 pm

Today is the day of silence as we mourn the tragic loss of Peter O'Toole the famous actor who portrayed Lawrence in Lawrence Of Arabia in 1963 along with Alec Guinness and Anthony Quinn. It was on May 28th 1963 that The Maryland Film Premier Of Lawrence Of Arabia made its showing at the Mayfair Theatre on 508 North Howard St,rewired and redecorated for the premier the Mayfair had upgraded features like new tangerine red curtains,new deep red carpeting was laid and new seats were installed. R.I.P Peter O.Toole August 2nd 1932-December 15th 2013.

John Bennaman.
John Bennaman. on September 12, 2013 at 7:24 am

Thanks Chuck1231, I am already familiar with Kilduff’s site, btw he is giving me two Stanley Theatre programs for free and one movie ad from both the Mayfair and Stanley. But I can never seem to get a picture of the Mayfair interior or the Auditorium interior.

John Bennaman.
John Bennaman. on September 11, 2013 at 10:45 pm

Tinseltoes do you by any chance have any historical programs or collections from the Auditorium or Mayfair like tickets or interior or exterior pictures of it. And if you do I would love to seeit.

dickneeds111
dickneeds111 on February 25, 2013 at 5:54 pm

I saw EXODUS at the Mayfair in 1960 in 70mm. It was one of the worst projected films I have ever seen at any major theatre. Everytime reels were switched you heard a sound like aclap of thunder. The reel changes were rough and you missed some of the dialogue on changeover. The theatre was dirty and in some dis repair. I vowed never to go back there again and I didn’t. I was a projectionist myself at the time at NAS Anacostia in D.C. and I noticed those mistakes.

John Bennaman.
John Bennaman. on December 1, 2011 at 3:28 pm

today the Mayfair is now listed as Baltimore’s Historical Landmark

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on November 17, 2011 at 7:10 am

This is an amazing photograph – not just for the shot itself but the subject matter. Those doors once led to the darkness of the auditorium where one came in to escape the harsh realities of the world outside, and now… A pretty remarkable image. And the lighting fixture on the left looks like the animated character Lumiere from Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast!”

JackCoursey
JackCoursey on December 19, 2010 at 8:02 am

Beautiful façade (Photo One, Photo Two and wonder if any photos of the interior exist. It must have been very spacious considering the size of the building and the seating capacity of only 850.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on November 2, 2010 at 8:02 pm

Pity a proud city can’t save this theatre.

Silicon Sam
Silicon Sam on November 2, 2010 at 12:32 pm

And the building to it’s South has crumbled too….

Silicon Sam
Silicon Sam on November 2, 2010 at 12:31 pm

Yeah, but now you can see it!

Silicon Sam
Silicon Sam on November 2, 2010 at 8:21 am

Zooming in on the map view in the title shows the roof is literally collapsed into the auditorium. It’s a goner now for sure….

wewinnow
wewinnow on November 2, 2010 at 7:19 am

Went there in the late 50’s to see the first 3d movie Bwana Devil. Glasses were cardboard and cellophane. Spears poked toward the audience.

jward
jward on November 24, 2006 at 7:56 am

I was wondering if anyone had photos of the exterior and interior of the Mayfair from the days it was known as the Auditorium that they would be willing to share. Thanks

DanHaga
DanHaga on October 4, 2006 at 9:32 am

www.urbanatrophy.com has done an excellent job photographing the Mayfair as it sits today in Sept. 2006. See dozens of photos of what the old theatre looks like now inside and out. Check out the site to see the photos.

DanHaga
DanHaga on October 4, 2006 at 9:31 am

www.urbanatrophy.com has done an excellent job photographing the Mayfair as it sits today in Sept. 2006. See dozens of photos of what the old theatre looks like now inside and out. Check out the site to see the photos.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on October 20, 2005 at 11:03 am

A May 2005 photo of the exterior of the Mayfair Theatre:
View link

JimRankin
JimRankin on April 5, 2004 at 7:31 am

There was a good article on the MAYFAIR in Marquee magazine of 4th Qtr., 1977 (Vol. 9 #4), pages 18-21, titled “Natatorium-Auditorium-Mayfair” by Robert K. Headley, Jr. It features seven vintage and modern photos, and may be available as described here:
PHOTOS AVAILABLE:
To obtain any available Back Issue of either “Marquee” or of its ANNUALS, simply go to the web site of the THEATRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA at:
www.HistoricTheatres.org
and notice on their first page the link “PUBLICATIONS: Back Issues List” and click on that and you will be taken to their listing where they also give ordering details. The “Marquee” magazine is 8-1/2x11 inches tall (‘portrait’) format, and the ANNUALS are also soft cover in the same size, but in the long (‘landscape’) format, and are anywhere from 26 to 40 pages. Should they indicate that a publication is Out Of Print, then it may still be possible to view it via Inter-Library Loan where you go to the librarian at any public or school library and ask them to locate which library has the item by using the Union List of Serials, and your library can then ask the other library to loan it to them for you to read or photocopy. [Photocopies of most THSA publications are available from University Microforms International (UMI), but their prices are exorbitant.]

Note: Most any photo in any of their publications may be had in large size by purchase; see their ARCHIVE link. You should realize that there was no color still photography in the 1920s, so few theatres were seen in color at that time except by means of hand tinted renderings or post cards, thus all the antique photos from the Society will be in black and white, but it is quite possible that the Society has later color images available; it is best to inquire of them.

Should you not be able to contact them via their web site, you may also contact their Executive Director via E-mail at:
Or you may reach them via phone or snail mail at:
Theatre Historical Soc. of America
152 N. York, 2nd Floor York Theatre Bldg.
Elmhurst, ILL. 60126-2806 (they are about 15 miles west of Chicago)

Phone: 630-782-1800 or via FAX at: 630-782-1802 (Monday through Friday, 9AM—4PM, CT)