Drexel Theatre

2254 E. Main Street,
Bexley, OH 43209

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Showing 1 - 25 of 34 comments

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on January 5, 2013 at 9:25 am

I’d hope they are headed for another theatre and not a scrapyard!

How will the Drexel ever show old movies if they no longer have any projectors?

Keith
Keith on January 5, 2013 at 9:20 am

I pull up to the drexel today and see the 35mm projectors in the back of a pick-up truck headed to the scrap yard. End of an era.

Keith
Keith on October 23, 2012 at 5:40 pm

Today, the box office revenue is up, content has never been better, and aajor renovation is being planned including a new roof, digital sound and projection, and, yes, new bathrooms. Part of a letter from the Chairman of the Board

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on March 18, 2011 at 4:38 am

CAPA are good folks, who got their start by saving the historic Ohio Theatre downtown back in 1969. They even have a little experience in movie exhibition, with the Ohio’s summer film series.

CSWalczak
CSWalczak on March 18, 2011 at 4:31 am

The Drexel has been acquired by a not-for-profit group that will use the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) to manage the theater: View link.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on July 12, 2010 at 12:49 am

I always liked the idea that Columbus could have its own local chain of art houses and didn’t have to depend on Landmark like other parts of the US. (Not the Landmark lasted very long either when they had their chance….)

meheuck
meheuck on July 12, 2010 at 12:45 am

In the case of Grandview, the Drexel operators had a dispute with the landlord and chose to leave the operation; a former employee decided to make a new deal with the owner of the building and renovate/reopen the theatre.

In the case of the Arena Grand and the Gateway, Jeff Frank was hired by the developers of those commercial districts to design the theatres, as well as book, staff, and run them. After a few years, I can only fathom that the developers thought they could find people to do the job better than Jeff, and dispensed with his services. Granted, I am prejudiced because I had a long and happy relationship working for him, but I have always felt it was rather rude and unceremonious of these consortiums to cut him out after he contributed so much time and energy in launching their theatres.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on July 12, 2010 at 12:28 am

By the way, the Arena Grand is not listed here at CinemaTreasures. Would someone local to Columbus like to add it?

CSWalczak
CSWalczak on July 11, 2010 at 9:45 pm

This now appears to be the sole remaining Drexel operation; their former Gateway is now independent (after a brief time as a Landmark theater), as are their former Arena Grand and Grandview theaters. I wonder why they have so much trouble making a go of things.

meheuck
meheuck on July 11, 2010 at 8:00 pm

The Drexel Theatre facade also provides the base for the cover painting of the Mark Knopfler compilation album of movie score music “Screenplaying,” though specific details that would i.d. the theatre have been altered. When I worked there, I was flattered that somebody at the record label was a fan of the theatre, but annoyed that they never credited us as the source of the image.

monika
monika on June 23, 2009 at 12:01 pm

Here’s a picture I took of the Drexel Theatre projection booth if anyone is interested: View link

kpdennis
kpdennis on April 25, 2009 at 9:04 pm

The Drexel in 1996 – the manager/owner can be seen in the lower right corner in the hat and white shirt:
View link

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on April 8, 2009 at 7:46 pm

An item in the September 18, 1937, issue of Boxoffice Magazine announced that construction had begun on William Chesbrough’s new Drexel Theatre. The new house was expected to open around January 1.

A paragraph published under the heading “Columbus” in the February 5, 1938, issue of Boxoffice Magazine indicates the sort of promotions theaters did in those days. It says “Wm. Chesbrough’s new Drexel Theatre presented "Brownie,” the educated dog, in a free show for children. Every boy and girl was asked to leave their name, date of birth and address for a Birthday Club which is to be started soon."

I’ve been unable to discover the architect of the Drexel, but as the house was in suburban Columbus, I’m wondering if perhaps it was designed and built by the F&Y Building Services, headquartered in that city and responsible for the creation of dozens of deco-moderne theaters in the region from the late 1930s on? It certainly resembles some of F&Y’s work.

monika
monika on March 25, 2009 at 12:49 pm

Posting to get this theatre back on my “notifications” list….

RichM
RichM on June 6, 2008 at 6:22 am

Saw some french art film, for high school art class here, and little else, although went to college and worked in Bexley in mid 80s.

Patrick Crowley
Patrick Crowley on April 23, 2008 at 6:51 am

Again, linking to images is perfectly legal, Warren.

This exact issue has been litigated in many countries around the world… and the result has always been that courts find such linking to be legal.

You’re welcome to disagree, but our policy isn’t up for discussion. I respect your point of view, but please refrain from trying to “police” the site for us.

That’s my job. ;)

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on April 23, 2008 at 5:19 am

So this website is now a “Punch & Judy” show, a public feud between Warren & Lost Memory?

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on April 23, 2008 at 4:58 am

I think the owners of CinemaTreasures should remove all comments on this page from “Apr 22, 2008 at 1:44pm” forward, as they are irrelevant to the Drexel. Also, it doesn’t matter who owns a Flickr scrapbook, only that the scrapbook is public.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on April 23, 2008 at 4:53 am

Ken, I rest my case. When people hide behind pseudonyms (“Lost Memory,” for example), it’s often difficult to know who the owner of a scrapbook might be. But based on readings of your frequent posts, I seriously doubt that you own any cinema-related material that could be used in a scrapbook. And your scant and faulty knowledge of cinemas and their history speaks for itself. Amen!

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on April 23, 2008 at 3:45 am

This is the Internet. Anyone can post a link to anywhere else at any time. If the owner of the photo did not want it linked to, he would have made it private.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on April 23, 2008 at 3:32 am

Patrick and Ken (aka “Lost Memory”), I must disagree with you both. Scrapbooks at websites like “flickr” and “Photobucket” are the property of their owners, who go to considerable time, effort and expense to put the images into their scrapbooks. Only the scrapbook owners have the right to post links at other websites. To the best of my knowledge, Ken has no scrapbook at “flickr” or any other such website. He posts the “flickr” links just to create the impression that he does. If either of you want to discuss this privately with me, I can be reached, as always, at .com

Patrick Crowley
Patrick Crowley on April 22, 2008 at 10:59 am

Warren, linking to copyrighted images is okay. Please stop bugging people about this.

These links are perfectly okay from a legal point of view, and there’s no policy against making such links on Cinema Treasures.

And I’m sure Flickr doesn’t mind the traffic we give them either.

Ron Newman
Ron Newman on April 22, 2008 at 10:52 am

So what? You can link to anything.

Warren G. Harris
Warren G. Harris on April 22, 2008 at 10:44 am

Ken, did you get permission from the scrapbook’s owner to post a link to that photo at Cinema Treasures? The photo has an “All Rights Reserved” statement underneath.

pjason
pjason on February 25, 2008 at 2:56 pm

Watched the 25th anniversary rerelease of “The Godfather” here in ‘97.Had a great time,loved the theater.Unfortunately haven’t made it back since.