Alhambra 1-7

Seestrasse 94, Wedding,
Berlin 13347

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There are actually three generations of the Alhambra in Berlin. The first one originated in the expansion of the 300 seat 1916-era Apollo Kino to 950 seats by architect Max Bischoff and its re-naming to Alhambra Kino. It was totally destroyed in World War II and rebuilt in 1953 to the designs of architects Hans Bielenberg and Helmut Ollk. Seating was provided in orchestra and balcony levels. It was closed in 2000 and demolished in 2001, and has it’s own page on Cinema Treasures.

In 2002 it was replaced with this Alhambra 1-7. It’s one of the few multiplexes with private ownership and has excellent technical facilities, a total seating capacity of 1,424; seating in the screens are 358, 342, 120, 208, 111, 147 and 138.

Contributed by Robert Burger

Recent comments (view all 4 comments)

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on April 21, 2005 at 2:09 am

The 4 Alhambra Cinemas at this location were:–

  1. A conversion from a shop, it seated 300 in 1916 and the auditorium ran parallel to Seestrasse.

  2. Rebuilt in 1921 to the designs of Max Bischoff and built by the great cinema builders Czutzka & Co. the auditorium was turned around to run parallel to Mullerstasse (the entrance was on Seestrasse but the address given was Mullerstrasse 156). The cinema was described as having a facade that stood out from the main block of the building, being framed with an expressionistic ornamental design. There were long windows on either side of the main entrance steps that originally had Moorish styled candelabra light fittings at their base. Seating in the auditorium was in orchestra and balcony levels and there were sea-shell type ornaments along the walls to the stage and decorative backlit windows ran along the upper walls. The ceiling had a painted frieze around the edge with a large candelabra hanging in the centre. An orchestra pit was provided, as were full stage facilities. Seating was for 950. This building was almost entirely destroyed by bombing during the war and the wrecked shell of the building was used to hang advertising space until 1953.

  3. In 1953, architect’s Hans Bielenberg and Helmut Ollk were commissioned to re-build the Alhambra as a modern cinema, using what remained of the original outer walls. The new frontage was faced in light yellow tiles and was outlined in neon. Inside the auditorium was given a sleek Art Moderne treatment with plain surfaces and concealed lighting. In 1981 seating was reduced to 500 in order to avoid paying high taxes (access to the balcony was closed off). This Alhambra was closed in 2000 and demolished in 2001.

  4. A new 7 screen multiplex Alhambra was built on the site. The seating capacity is 1,424 and auditoriums have Dolby-Digital SDDS Digital, DTS Digital Dolby.

mrguy
mrguy on July 30, 2006 at 1:23 pm

My wife, who was born in Berlin, saw Mad Max 2 at the Alhambra in 1981. It’s sad to know that they also tear down beautiful old theaters and buildings in Europe too.

kinokompendium.de
kinokompendium.de on June 30, 2007 at 4:53 am

More infos and photographs on this theater (and many others) can be found on the non profit, German language only Berlin Movie Theater Guide – www.kinokompendium.de:
Alhambra Multiplex (since 2002) or
Alhambra one screen (1953 until 2nd September 1999)

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