Oneonta Theatre

47 Chestnut Street,
Oneonta, NY 13820

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Roger Katz
Roger Katz on December 9, 2012 at 1:22 pm

The theatre is closing on January 1.

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2012/12/oneonta_theatre_closing_cny_concerts.html

cmbussmann
cmbussmann on April 19, 2012 at 2:37 pm

The Oneonta Theatre, aka The Oneonta 1 & 2, was actually my least favorite of the three Oneonta movie joints available to me growing up. The main auditorium was really nice, with beautiful vaudevillian ornamentation and a huge screen. A little run-down, it had a shabby retro-chic that I admired. But the acoustics of the main room were a huge problem. If you sat under the balcony, the sound was super-compressed, muffled, and difficult to hear. If you sat closer to the screen, the open-air acoustics absorbed most of the dialogue. Sound in the balcony (which was rarely open during my time there) wasn’t much better. That room was great for live theater (The Orpheus troupe performed there often) but was pretty dismal for films.

The second room was built off the balcony and was also pretty pathetic. Super-tiny, it held only 200 people and had two huge support pillars jutting up through the floor into the ceiling, obscuring the view if you didn’t sit dead center. The sound was fine, however, and it was in this room that I first saw “Pulp Fiction,” which was a minor epiphany at the time.

The 1 & 2 stopped showing first-run movies sometime around 2006 and the building has since been completely restored and repurposed as a live event space hosting minor circuit touring bands. I am glad it was saved and restored and think it will live a better life as a concert hall than it did as a movie theater.

SchineHistorian
SchineHistorian on May 13, 2011 at 3:01 pm

Hey AlbanyGregg – Theatre Historical Society is planning their Conclave for the Albany/Berkshire area in 2013 – sounds like you would have a LOT of ideas for us! Email me at if you’d like to start a dialog on the “don’t miss” locations in your region! (Troy & Cohoes are on the “must see” list along with, obviously, the Palace)

gd14lawn
gd14lawn on May 13, 2011 at 8:06 am

Although it has been much remodeled through the years, the Orpheum Theatre in Boston dates from 1852. It is listed here on CT.

In Troy NY, we have the Troy Music Hall which opened in 1875. It has never been a motion picture theatre so it is not listed on this site. It has spectacular acoustics and has only featured musical performances.

Near here is also the Cohoes Music Hall, which opened in 1874. Although it is restored and open today, it was closed for 69 years (1905-1974). It is used for live theatre productions today.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on March 2, 2011 at 1:30 am

Good picture of theatre,Stories also interesting.

SchineHistorian
SchineHistorian on November 17, 2010 at 3:51 am

Photos taken November 15, 2010 at the Oneonta Theater. It was great to meet Tom the owner and supporters Julie and Patrice.

View link

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on August 9, 2010 at 6:25 pm

Nice article good luck to them.

theOT
theOT on June 27, 2010 at 11:45 pm

The Oneonta Theatre is reopening Saturday July 31st 2010 as Central NY’s newest yet oldest national touring venue. The open house Gala is free to the public and will be celebrated with some central NY’s most talented acts and artists.

If anyone has pictures of the theatre or knows who has some, we would love to get copies , we are trying to compile everything we can for our history wall and website. the oldes phot we have is 1970

Does anyone know of any theatre still in operation that are older than the 1897 Oneonta Theatre. The only one I could find was the Walnut in Philidelphia.

movieresearch
movieresearch on December 19, 2009 at 3:56 am

View link

Built in 1897 by Oneonta resident Willard E. Yager, the theater was host to a range of entertainers, including humorist Will Rogers in 1927. Movie screenings began in 1913, FOTOT officials said.

The Oneonta Theatre has 675 seats, plus about 200 in a balcony, an orchestra pit, a 60-foot fly space and three floors of dressing rooms.

keeper0430
keeper0430 on August 26, 2009 at 3:01 pm

There is a new owner of the building and progress has been made to lease the theater to a local grassroots group.

Stay tuned for a big announcement in the next few weeks.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on January 17, 2009 at 2:32 am

In 1955 the Oneonta Theater had 1,100 seats.

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on March 25, 2008 at 4:46 pm

Here is a 2008 photo of the “One nta” aka Oneonta Theater.

undercrank
undercrank on September 24, 2007 at 1:30 am

There is a film series held there on Tuesday evenings, run by the Upper Catskill Community Council of the Arts. I’ve been booked to accompany a show on Oct 23 of the silent Phantom of the Opera, and will aim to take pics of the theater and post them here.

FYI I will be using a virtual Wurlitzer which runs on a laptop, and a midi keyboard and midi organ pedals for the show.

FunkyChicken
FunkyChicken on May 13, 2007 at 1:06 am

The Oneonta Theater stopped showing first-run features in November 2006. They continue a holiday film series and art films with the local arts council. The owner is not selling the theater and there are efforts to revitalize the theater for both movies and performances.

My first job was at this theater and it’s a great one!

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on December 23, 2006 at 11:13 pm

Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002

Oneonta Theatre (added 2002 – Building – #02000555)
47 Chestnut St., Oneonta
Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event
Area of Significance: Architecture, Entertainment/Recreation
Period of Significance: 1875-1899, 1900-1924, 1925-1949
Owner: Private
Historic Function: Recreation And Culture
Historic Sub-function: Theater
Current Function: Recreation And Culture
Current Sub-function: Museum

Lost Memory
Lost Memory on August 25, 2006 at 12:38 pm

This is a recent photo of the Oneonta Theater.

roberttoplin
roberttoplin on April 18, 2004 at 5:04 am

The Oneonta Theatre opened Jan.31,1898. The Architect was Leon H. Lempert Sr.