Studio 1

11 Atlantic Avenue,
Lynbrook, NY 11563

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Showing 1 - 25 of 34 comments

robboehm
robboehm on October 4, 2013 at 11:06 pm

Re your comment that perhaps the Lyric became the Strand in RVC. I doubt it. The Strand had a seating capacity well over 1,000. Highly unlikely in this time period.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on October 4, 2013 at 11:09 am

Every time I’ve been in Lynbrook Bagels since then, I haven’t seen the owner or manager – just the girls out front handling the busy line. I have to get in there when it isn’t so crowded and bustling and ask about that image.

robboehm
robboehm on October 4, 2013 at 10:38 am

Ed, what happened to the photo you mentioned in June?

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on October 4, 2013 at 9:37 am

According to this ad, posted by RidgewoodKen under the Strand Theater in Hempstead, NY, the Arcade was operated by the O'Connor-Radin Circuit in 1913. They also operated the Lyric Theatre of Rockville Centre, as mentioned in the ad, which has no listing on CT. It is possible, however, that the Lyric might have later become the Strand Theatre, which does have a listing, right here. The Hempstead Strand closed in 1926 (by that time, under the Calderone brand), and the only photo we have of the RVC Strand dates to 1929, so it is a possibility.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on June 11, 2012 at 10:00 am

Lynbrook Bagels, diagonally across the street from the former Studio 1, has a pair of flat screen displays in their shop that present a slide-show of images tracing the history of the shop over the years. One of these is a vintage B&W shot looking north on Atlantic Ave that clearly shows the Arcade’s marquee projecting over the sidewalk on the left. I couldn’t stick around long enough to catch the image come around again on the loop, and get a movie title or approximate date. Next time I’m in there, I have to ask the manager if he has an actual copy of that picture, or at least inquire where he found it.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 30, 2011 at 12:50 pm

Thanks for sharing, Ed. That was my impression as well, without any details coming to memory. Would you say that was a result of a remodeling or did the room appear to be more or less original in its appointments – however non-descript they may have been? A lot of theaters concealed or stripped away old decor in favor of easier to clean and maintain drapery or upholstery. To me the Studio 1 just felt like a more modern cinema – a drab and unadorned box indistinguishable from the rooms at the Belair Twin, say, or the RKO twin in Rockville Centre. Whereas, when I sat in the old Fantasy or the RKO on Rockaway Ave, I knew I was in an old and decorous movie theater.

Ed Miller
Ed Miller on August 30, 2011 at 12:15 pm

Ed, my recollection of the interior of the Arcade/Studio 1 is that it was very small and nondescript, very much like the interiors of the Bleeker Street Cinema and the Orpheum Thaeter in Manhatttan’s East Village. I was in this thater about a dozen times, under both of its names, and I don’t recall anything memorable whatsoever about the interior. Ed Miller

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 30, 2011 at 8:44 am

I wish we could find some vintage interior photographs. I recall nothing about the theater’s interior from its days as the Studio 1. I always presumed it was a more modern cinema from the 1960’s, whereas I always knew that the UA Lynbrook around the corner was at one time a classic old movie house with stage and balcony. I had no idea, at the time (1979-1984), about this theater’s history, let alone that it dated back to 1913!

robboehm
robboehm on August 29, 2011 at 10:58 pm

It ticks me off when a theatre is called the itch, not for any sanitary reasons, but because of uncomfortable seats. I was there once, as the Arcade, to see some film not available at any of the neighbs. I only remember the ceiling being fairly low compared to my home theatre, the Bellerose, which was so high it could have accommodated a substantial balcony.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 29, 2011 at 10:55 am

The article states that the Lyn Gift Shop now occupies the old theater. While that may be true of the interior – that the gift shop extends back into the wider former auditorium space – it seems to me that the former entrance to the theater was located between the Hallmark store entrance and the Gift Shop entrance, centered under the small clock tower that now exists on the current facade. Looking at the 1986 images from American Classic Images, posted above by RobertR, the gift shop’s entrance is about where the Arnee Appliances storefront was.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on August 29, 2011 at 10:47 am

A nice little article about the former Arcade Theatre was published in an April edition of the Lynbrook Patch. Here’s a link to the article, which includes a wonderful vintage photo as well as a couple of modern shots.

In the vintage image, the theatre is on the right with an arched entrance and no marquee projection at all. Nice to see what the original facade looked like!

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on January 15, 2011 at 9:50 am

Thanks for the links to those photos, RobertR… No one around here (I am a Lynbrook resident) even remembers this theater!!! And, by the way, I guess we can put the debate to rest as to the actual name of the theater. The heading above should be corrected from Studio One to Studio 1.

Ed Miller
Ed Miller on May 27, 2010 at 12:05 pm

The Studio 1 was great for showing the unusual and offbeat. I saw “Outrageous” there in 1977:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHrlDzkerOI

I’m glad that it was confirmed the the Arcade and Studio 1 were the same theater, because that’s how I remember it. I was a Valley Stream resident, and we went to movie theaters all over the area in the 50s, 60, and 70s.

formerprojectionist
formerprojectionist on December 16, 2009 at 7:23 pm

Yes, they were having midnight movies there throughout the late 70’s and early 80’s. I saw a Three Stooges/Little Rascals midnight show, plus they showed Night of the Living Dead and When The Screaming Stops there. Screaming Stops had a vomit bag that was given out. I saw Screamers, a Roger Corman released Italian horror/sci-fi flick there with my girlfriend. I saw the remake of 1984 with Richard Burton at this theater as well. I bought a Super 8mm sound projector from Arnee, a Umig (sp), real nice strong metal projector, Austrian made, still runs great!

RobertR
RobertR on April 17, 2009 at 1:46 pm

I saw this film here
View link

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on March 8, 2008 at 1:19 pm

When a theatre is nicknamed the Itch, it means that the place is so run-down and decrepit that it is probably infested with fleas and other bugs, so that when you go there you wind up itching and scratching yourself.

There used to be Itches all over the country, but with the rise of the chains and the demise of the discount houses, most Itches are now just a fond memory.

guitarteen226
guitarteen226 on March 8, 2008 at 11:19 am

The Arcade Theartre and moive house (aka “the Itch”) (Studio One) was constructed in 1913 after the Lynbrook Lyceum burned down. It had a seating capacity of 549.

History of Lynbrook, Arthur S. Mattson

“The Itch”….that is just a weird nickname…

Greenpoint
Greenpoint on December 15, 2007 at 1:19 pm

Ed Solero heres and updated link for this theatre:

View link

klp
klp on December 22, 2006 at 6:05 am

Not so fast. I believe that “1” is correct. But to make abasolootely shaw, I will call my cousin, Glen. My uncle’s son became more involved in the theaters while my father opened an inn and I was busy being a hippy. Perhaps he has pictures! I will post any results.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on December 21, 2006 at 10:10 am

I see the theater was just updated, but I’m not sure what info was changed. If Bryan reads this, we need to amend the following:

Name: Studio One (not Studio 1)
Seating: 574 (based on the 1950 FDY listing as posted by Ken Roe yesterday)

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on December 21, 2006 at 8:14 am

I guess you also have confirmed that the theater’s proper name was “Studio One” and not “Studio 1”… The name of this listing ought to be corrected accordingly. Also… did you guys run late night revival showings? Maybe at Midnight? I’m thinking particularly of Kubrick’s “A Clockwork Orange” as well as Carl Reiner’s hilarious “Where’s Poppa?” which possibly played with the late ‘60’s French comedy “The King of Hearts” starring Alan Bates and Genevieve Bujold. Another late-night double feature I remember seeing was the popular pairing of “Kentucy Fried Movie” and “The Groove Tube.” These all would have been around 1980-1983 or so.

Ed Solero
Ed Solero on December 21, 2006 at 8:02 am

Thanks for sharing the memories, Keith. No chance of any photos in your parents' posession or your uncle’s? I contacted the Lynbrook library about the Arcade/Studio 1 Theater, but they couldn’t really help me. I believe there is a Lynbrook Historical Society, which may be an avenue worth pursuing… I just haven’t as yet found the time.

klp
klp on December 21, 2006 at 7:19 am

Unfortunately I haven’t any photos of the Arcade or Studio One. I came to this site to find them! As far as I can tell, your photos are accurate. Especially those from the rear where my father parked his car. The marquee of the Arcade was a semi-circle with a striking ‘ARCADE’ on top. The new marquee reflected the “modern” early sixties. A narrow horizontal square with a vertical one above it, centered, pointing out from the building and displaying the current show. Classy. All white, as was the facade which had a big red STUDIO ONE lighted sign. The theater had an intimite feel and was reborn with new seats, wall decorations, lighting, curtain, carpet, etc. My mother being an interior decorator, she really got into it. We had all sorts of fabric samples around the house. My father said that he purposely waited until A Hard Day’s Night was finished, before they transformed the place for fear of damage. I recall that the Arcade was in a pretty funky state.
I want to tell of an unrelated phenomenon I noticed when I was working at the Roslyn Theater. The film, “Wait Until Dark” had a fun gimmick. During the last 10 minutes all of the lights in the theater would be turned out for the hair raising conclusion. We received no such instructions, but having heard the ads, I got into it. I flicked off anything I could find. Including the exit signs! At this point the screen is completely black as the music swells and we wonder of Alan Arkin is really dead.
When he lunges out toward Audrey Hepburn, the violins all hitting their highest and loudest notes, I noticed something interesting. Night after night I saw an entire audience actually rise several inches and fall back in their seats, along with the screams.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on December 21, 2006 at 12:02 am

I have passed this location many times and never noticed the back. And now, poof, there’s an old theater right in front of me. Thanks, Ed.