Ritzy Picturehouse

Brixton Oval, Coldharbour Lane,
London, SW2 1JG

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Showing 11 comments

woody
woody on June 11, 2010 at 7:02 pm

photos from the World Premiere of he British film Shank in March 2010, in a recent refurbishment, the box office and the cafe have swapped places, so the original cinema entrance is now a large cafe bar and the cinema is entered from the new extension
exterior
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4689432494/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688798207/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688799893/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4689429956/
lobby with temporary red carpet for the premiere
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688800627/
auditorium with the director and cast on stage
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688802081/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688801325/
and after the crowds had gone
http://www.flickr.com/photos/woody1969/4688797303/

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on May 20, 2010 at 4:35 pm

Interesting youtube video of the RITZY PICTURHOUSE.

Ian
Ian on December 25, 2007 at 2:08 pm

A few vintage (1984) shots of the Ritzy here:–

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Ian
Ian on May 6, 2006 at 7:32 am

Another interior picture here from 1985

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Ken Roe
Ken Roe on November 8, 2005 at 3:48 am

Some before and after photographs of the Ritzy Picturehouse and more historic details:
http://www.urban75.org/brixton/history/ritzy.html

Close-up before and after photographs:
http://www.urban75.org/brixton/history/ritzy2.html

The site of the Ritzy prior to its errection and the Brixton Theatre & Opera House which stood next door:
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Architect Frank Matcham designed the Brixton Theatre & Opera House. It was never a cinema, but worth mentioning here. It was destroyed by bombing in World War II and the site is now used by the Ritzy as their newly built bar/cafe and 4 extra screens, as shown in the bottom photo.
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Two more before and after photographs:
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Ken Roe
Ken Roe on October 2, 2005 at 4:43 pm

The Ritzy Cinema is now known as the Ritzy Picturehouse.

kevinp
kevinp on August 7, 2005 at 5:39 am

I remember the Ritzy well, as I used to go there on a Saturday night after finishing my shift at Streatham Odeon ( FKA The Astoria ).
Great programming and friendly staff.

Herewith a link to an early picture from 1911, and an interior of the restored auditorium : hats off

View link

best

kevp

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on July 28, 2005 at 5:03 pm

An exterior photo and some history on the Ritzy Cinema, Brixton, London here:
http://www.tnunn.f2s.com/ritzy.htm

woody
woody on April 1, 2005 at 10:53 am

It also plays host to regular q&a’s with top talent, recent guests include M. Night Shyamalan(digital village screening), Spike Lee (masterclass), Michael Winterbottom and Kieran O'Brien (9 Songs screening and q&a) and director Ken Loach. Which is quite amazing given its rough but vibrant neighbourhood, its in an equivalent area to the Kings in Brooklyn and no less iconic to its local supporters and residents.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on April 1, 2005 at 9:29 am

Opened on 11th March 1911 as the Electric Pavilion, the architects were E.C. Homer and Lucas. It later dropped the ‘Electric’ from its name and became the Pavilion. Slight modifications were carried out by architect George Coles in 1954 and the cinema was re-named Pullman from 31st August 1954.

Ten years later on 17th May 1964 it was taken over by Classic Cinemas and re-named Classic. It closed on 5th June 1976 and there was a threat of demolition. However the local Lambeth Council came to the rescue as part of an urban developement grant and it re-opened on 3rd March 1978 as the Little Bit Ritzy Cinema.

It closed again in 1993 and Oasis Cinemas purchased the building in 1994 and it re-opened as the Ritzy. In 1995 an extensive renovation was carried out that restored the Edwardian decorations of the main auditorium and 4 extra screens were constructed on vacant land alongside the building. On this land had originally been the Brixton Theatre designed by Frank Matcham which suffered bomb damage during World War II.

Now operated by City Screen, who operate under the Picture House Cinemas brand name, it is one of the most popular cinemas in inner South London and has also a bar and cafe attached.