Roxy Theatre

714 Main Street,
Lewiston, ID 83501

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OCRon
OCRon on December 3, 2014 at 8:41 pm

Here is a timeline of the Roxy from the Lewiston Tribune:

September 4, 1911: Opens as the Theatorium

September 30, 1928: Renamed the Granada

April 1, 1934: Renamed the Roxy

1980: Closed by Landmark Theatres (of Canada)

On March 9, 1934 it was reported that Edwin Rivers and Ford Bratcher were moving all of the equipment, seats, drapery, and carpeting from the old Granada Theatre to the Rex Theatre (previous the Paramount). The Rex then became the new Granada and the old Granada reopened on April 1, 1934 as the Roxy. No reason was given for this game of musical names.

cristie
cristie on January 31, 2012 at 5:40 pm

Hello, my name is Cristina and I’m a junior at Clakrston high school. I’m writing a paper on historic places in Lewiston Idaho and i wanted to write it on the Roxy theater or the liberty theater. one huge problem I have is that I cant get a hold of the owners of those places so I can go and take pictures and interview them so if any one could/would help me on finding a way of communicating with them that would be great and much appreciated thank you <3 my email is

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on July 3, 2011 at 5:55 am

A Roxy Theatre in Lewiston was mentioned in published sources as early as 1941. I’d assume it was this theater. I’ve also come across mention of a Rex Theatre in Lewiston operating in 1932. Possibly an aka for the Roxy? The signage would have been cheap to change.

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on November 2, 2007 at 11:52 am

Here is a photo of the Roxy by Seth Gaines:
http://tinyurl.com/2mutk2

JimRankin
JimRankin on July 2, 2004 at 6:13 am

It is amazing how many theatres are named ROXY as inspired by the once famous name of the New York City panjandrum of the movie palace: Samuel Lionel Rothapfel = “Roxy”. His namesake was the famous, 6000-seat ROXY THEATRE in NYC, which outlasted him by only 25 years when it was demolished in 1960. The whole story is nowhere better told than in that landmark book “The Best Remaining Seats: The Story of the Golden Age of the Movie Palace” by the late Ben M. Hall in 1961. Various editions of it are sometimes available from www.Amazon.com, but only the first edition contains the color plates, though many libraries have, or can order, copies of it. The Theatre Historical Soc. of America ( www.HistoricTheatres.org ) was his legacy, and they have much data/photos of the ROXY..