Coronet 1 & 2

993 Third Avenue,
New York, NY 10022

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Cinema 1, 2, 3 and Coronet 1 & 2 - 2001

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The former Baronet & Coronet was once one of the hottest places to see first run films on New York’s Upper East Side during the 1960’s and 1970’s.

Sadly, it’s once famous facade and reputation declined in the past 25 years and the theater finally closed in September 2001. The old Baronet & Coronet lettering and crowns could still be seen through decades of dirt caked on to its fading exterior.

The theater has been demolished to make way for an office building.

Contributed by Ross Melnick

Recent comments (view all 165 comments)

dave-bronx™
dave-bronx™ on June 6, 2013 at 10:59 am

Does anybody remember the little Walter Reade art house that was on 58th St. btwn Lexington and Park, mid-block on the south side of the street? I can’t remember the name of it, and I want to look it up here on CT. At the time that Pathé Cinema lost the lease on the Paris Theatre in the early 90s they looked at this former Reade house as a place to possibly relocate to. It was then being used as a chapel by the Archdiocese of New York, and they weren’t interested in giving it up. Today I think there is a Subway sandwich shop in there.

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on June 6, 2013 at 12:35 pm

It was the Fine Arts. It became a spin off of St Patrick’s cathederal for many years but that closed about 10 years ago

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on June 17, 2013 at 5:20 am

A few photos of the Coronet Theatre appear on this page of the July, 1963, issue of International Projectionist.

theamazin
theamazin on June 18, 2013 at 4:28 am

I worked at the Baronet Coronet as the assistant manager from the opening of Ghostbusters 2 in June 1989 until March 1990. Before the Baronet Coronet I worked at the Manhattan Twin around the corner as an usher. After the BC I was given my own theater. I became the manager of The Regency on the westside in March of 1990. The first movie I showed there was Nuns on the Run.

The Baronet Coronet was an awesome place to work. For Cineplex Odeon, who owned it at the time, it was one of their premiere NYC venues so we got a lot of perks. I remember meeting lots of celebrities while working there. The place was huge and filled with history, even after the renovation.

I’m now a professional screenwriter, but before Hollywood I worked at many, now closed and demolished NYC theaters. The Paramount, a tiny theater that was across from FAO Schwartz that I can’t remember the name. Another tiny theater in the basement of the Plaza Hotel. Can’t remember the name of the that one either. The World Wide Plaza. If anyone has any questions about these theaters maybe I can help. : )

HowardBHaas
HowardBHaas on June 18, 2013 at 9:00 am

I saw a movie in the Cinema 3 that was a small single screen in the Plaza Hotel http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/6461

I didn’t get to the Paramount Columbus Circle but figured it wasn’t too small http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2654

Mikeoaklandpark
Mikeoaklandpark on June 18, 2013 at 10:17 am

Howard. The Paramount Columbus Circle was definately small. I saw The Blue Lagoon there in 70MM and the screen was also not very large. I saw Brubaker at Cinema 3 and it was about the same size as the paramount.

Garth
Garth on August 10, 2013 at 4:28 pm

Saw “The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea” at the Coronet in ‘76, and “A Different Story” at Baronet in '78.

hdtv267
hdtv267 on August 10, 2013 at 5:23 pm

knowing I’m about 2 ½ months late to the party, circling back to what Howard and Mike mentioned, I attended a movie at the Columbus Circle, not very large, my senility is keeping me from recalling the film I saw there. I vaguely recall going down these steps to get into the theatre?

mariaconfetti
mariaconfetti on August 14, 2014 at 11:50 am

I worked a block away in the 80’s and went to the movies every week – sometimes a couple of times a week. I loved going there. They were clean, played the regular movies, plus the art & foreign movies. Used to catch the 5PM’s to avoid the crazy lines.

Remember getting an invite to the Patch Adams screening while waiting in line for a blockbuster movie, which I can’t recall.

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