Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Louvee Theatre on Mar 5, 2015 at 2:29 am

The Louvee Theatre was designed and built by the F & Y Building Service of Columbus, Ohio. It was on a list of eleven of the compnay’s recent projects that was published in the October 27, 1938, issue of the Boone County Recorder.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Marysville Cinema on Mar 5, 2015 at 2:22 am

The Avalon Theatre was designed and built by the F & Y Building Service of Columbus, Ohio. It was one of eleven theaters on a list of the company’s projects in an ad that was published in the October 27, 1938, issue of the Boone County Recorder.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Arlington Theater on Mar 5, 2015 at 2:18 am

An ad for the F & Y Building Service in the Boone County Recorder of October 27, 1938, listed the Arlington Theatre as one of five houses in Columbus that the firm had designed and built by that time. The others were the Westmont, the Fifth Avenue, the Cleve, and the Indianola.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about 5th Avenue Theater on Mar 5, 2015 at 2:17 am

An ad for the F & Y Building Service in the October 27, 1938, issue of the Boone County Recorder (PDF here) listed the Fifth Avenue Theatre as one of five Columbus houses it had designed.

If this house originally opened in 1920 then the project by F & Y must have been a remodeling or a replacement. I don’t think the company began designing and building theaters until the mid-1930s, though F & Y Construction had been in business since the 1910s.

In the ad uploaded by dbellis54 the text says “Have you seen the New Fifth Ave.? Modern!” which suggests a recent remodeling. The movie advertised, Born to Dance was released in the U.S. on November 27, 1936, according to IMDb, so the ad for this sub-run house probably dates from well into 1937. It’s likely that this was the theater that F & Y worked on in the 1930s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Village Cinema on Mar 5, 2015 at 12:20 am

An ad for the F & Y Building Service in the October 27, 1938, issue of the Boone County Recorder (PDF here) said that Erlanger’s new Gayety Theatre was one of eleven movie houses the company had designed and built since December, 1937.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Miami Western Theater on Mar 4, 2015 at 11:51 pm

The Miami-Western Theatre opened on September 23, 1938, per a full-page ad for the theater in Miami University’s 1939 yearbook. The Streamline Modern auditorium featured murals depicting student life at Miami University on one side wall and at Western College for Women on the other. The house closed in 1988.

An ad for the F & Y Building Service in the October 27, 1938, issue of the Boone County Recorder (PDF here) of Burlington, Kentucky, on the occasion of the opening of the Gayety Theatre in nearby Erlanger, had a list of several theaters designed and built by F & Y since December, 1937, including the Miami-Western.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Princess 4 Theatres on Mar 4, 2015 at 10:49 pm

A brochure for a walking tour of Oxford’s uptown business district (large PDF file) says that the Princess Theatre was built in 1911 and opened as the Oxford Theatre. It became the Talawanda Theatre in 1950, and was enlarged and renamed the Princess in the 1980s.

This January 25, 2015, article in the Journal-News says that plans are afoot to build a new building for the theaters on a lot adjacent to the Princess and incorporate the facade of the existing Arts and Crafts style building as the entrance to the new theaters, but the plans have not yet been approved. I haven’t found any more recent articles about the proposal.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sorg Opera House on Mar 4, 2015 at 5:34 am

The MidPointe Library has a few photos of the Sorg Opera House/Colonial Theatre. Unfortunately, none show the interior.

This photo shows the building around 1950, shortly after it had been remodeled and renamed the Colonial Theatre.

Somewhat clearer is this 1975 photo which shows more of the facade’s Romanesque Revival details.

This photo is from around 1900.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Isis Theatre on Mar 3, 2015 at 10:45 pm

Though it was still standing when the current Google Street View was made, this page says that the building was demolished in April, 2014. Farther down the page it says that the Isis operated until the end of the silent era, and in 1930 was rebuilt as offices by Western Union.

CharmaineZoe provides this vintage photo of the Isis Theatre, probably from around 1926, the year the movie Midnight Sun was released.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Orpheum Theater on Mar 3, 2015 at 8:44 pm

The Orpheum opened on April 2, 1908. This item about the event is from the April 4 issue of Variety:

SUN & MURRAY’S NEW VENTURE.

“Zanesville, O., April 2.

“Sun & Murray this week opened the Orpheum with vaudeville. The following made up the first show: Alburtus and Altus, comedy club juggling; Georgia Lewis, monologue and singing; Ann Hamilton, sketch, ‘Beggars’; John H. West, musical Brownie; Four Dancing Harrises, dancing.”

Gus Sun was a former juggler, vaudevillian, and minstrel who entered the theater business in 1904,opening a small vaudeville and picture house in Springfield, Ohio. By 1909 he had a circuit of a dozen theaters and booked dozens of other houses through the booking agency he founded in 1906.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Studio Theater on Mar 3, 2015 at 5:49 am

The Strand Theatre that opened in 1929 was actually the second Strand Theatre at this address. The first was a smaller theater that opened on March 12, 1922. Here is a drawing of the first Strand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Paramount Theatre on Mar 3, 2015 at 5:21 am

24 N. Broad Street was the Paramount’s historic address, but Middletown has renumbered its lots and the Paramount’s site is on what is now South Broad Street. In this aerial photo from 1955, the intersection of Central Avenue and Broad Street is at center bottom, and the Paramount can be seen on the west side of Broad halfway up the block north of Central.

The Paramount is at right in this 1962 photo. The building housing Doan’s Ace Hardware is still standing, but has been stripped of its modern front, revealing what remains of the much older facade beneath.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Majestic Theater on Mar 3, 2015 at 3:18 am

An item about the renovation of the Majestic Theatre in Freeport appeared in the December 27, 1913, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“L. W. Guiteau, manager of the Majestic Theater, Freeport, Ill., has spent a large amount of money upon improvements to his house. The seating capacity has been increased to over 500, a new and bigger screen has been installed; upon which a picture 12 by 16 feet will be projected. A number of other improvements were made including new seats and wiring.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Play House Theater on Mar 3, 2015 at 3:00 am

The December 27, 1913, issue of The Moving Picture World described the recently opened Play House this way:

“CAPACITY BUSINESS AT PLAY HOUSE.

“Ever since the Play House, Ridgewood, N. J., opened on November 22, the management has been playing to capacity business. The structure, which is of concrete construction, measures 52 feet by 154 feet, and has 800 seats on the parquet floor and 200 in the balcony. The seats were bought of the Andrews Seating Company, and the stage scenery and curtain were furnished by the Lee Lash Studios. The interior decorative scheme is ivory, gold and brown ornamental plaster. In the operating room there are two Simplex machines and a Hallberg economizer; the projection machines are fitted with Gundlach-Manhattan lenses. The length of the throw is 127 feet. The indirect lighting system is used throughout the house. The ventilation system can supply thirty cubic feet of air per minute. The screen is located at the back of the stage and is framed in black. The admission prices are 10 and 15 cents, except when specials are run when the price is raised to 15 and 20 cents. The General Film Service is used with features from the Famous Players Company. A piano is the only musical instrument in the house. The lobby is of tile and marble. William W. Young is the resident manager. The theater is owned by the Ridgewood Play House Company, of which Walter W. Wilsey is president; Thomas Nicholas, of Nutley, vice-president, and A. N. Van Liew, of Newark, Secretary and treasurer. The board of directors consists of Howard Peck, of South Orange, and Albert W. Fish, Bloomfield.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Town Theatre on Mar 2, 2015 at 10:51 pm

The 1927 FDY lists the Rialto Theatre as one of four houses in Cedar Rapids that were operated by Paramount-Publix affiliate A. H. Blank. The others were the Isis, the Palace, and the Strand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Mar 2, 2015 at 10:45 pm

The 1927 FDY lists the Palace Theatre as one of four houses in Cedar Rapids that were operated by Paramount-Publix affiliate A. H. Blank. The others were the Isis, the Rialto, and the Strand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about World Theatre on Mar 2, 2015 at 10:20 pm

The Strand was the project that was the subject of this item from the January 9, 1915, issue of Construction News:

“Cedar Rapids, Iowa—2 Stores (Rent) & Theater, O. O., $85,000, 3rd Av. Archt., W. J. Brown, American Trust Bldg., Cedar Rapids, plans in progress. Owner, Mike Ford, Paving Contractor, 208 2nd Av., Cedar Rapids. Brk. & terra cotta, 2 stys. & bas., 60x140. Storage & scenery. Seat. cap., 1,500. Owner will take bids about Jan. 15, 1915.”
The World Theatre was mentioned as one of his works in the obituary of William Jay Brown in the Feb. 5, 1970, edition of The Cedar Rapids Gazette.

The 1927 FDY lists the Strand Theatre as one of four Cedar Rapids houses operated by Paramount-Publix affiliate A. H. Blank. The other three were the Isis, the Rialto, and the Palace.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about "OC Teen Leads Crusade to Ban Drinking at Cinema" From Aliso Viejo, CA. on Mar 2, 2015 at 8:11 pm

They’ll undoubtedly overcharge for the drinks, but if having a drink keeps teenagers from sitting next to me in a theater it might be worth it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Luna Theatre on Mar 2, 2015 at 2:35 am

It has only just occurred to me that the Bill Moore of Fairfax, Oklahoma, who supervised the rebuilding of the Luna Theatre for architect Gates Corgan in 1936 was probably the William J. Moore who became the partner of Corgan’s son Jack in the firm of Corgan & Moore.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colonial Theatre on Mar 1, 2015 at 6:53 am

The Colonial Theatre was in operation by 1903. Shakespeare on the Stage, a 1915 book by William Winter, cites a May 11, 1903, matinée of a production of The Taming of the Shrew at the house. The 1909-1910 edition of the Cahn guide listed the Colonial as a ground floor house with 1,050 seats. The 1912 guide has Taylor’s Colonial Theatre with 1,078 seats including 440 on the orchestra floor, 238 in the balcony, and 400 in a gallery. The rebuilding in 1924 was probably quite drastic to accommodate the 1,359 seats it had later.

The September 9, 1940, issue of the Peekskill Highland Democrat said that the Colonial Theatre, which had been built “…nearly a half century ago….” was soon to be demolished. The house had been bought from the Singers by Paramount, who also acquired the recently-remodeled Peekskill Theatre. A fire had damaged the Colonial and the seats had been removed from the balcony as a result.

I don’t know if the Colonial was one of those theaters that the FDY continued listing after it was gone or not, but it certainly could have been.

The 1940 article can be found in column four near the bottom of this single-page PDF.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lando-Grand Theatre on Mar 1, 2015 at 6:00 am

spectrumis correct. The photo depicts the Grand Theatre on Fifth Avenue, which we have listed under its later name Warner Theatre.

The November 8, 1947 ad in Boxoffice that I mistakenly dated to 1940 in my earlier comment can be seen at lower right on this page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Aggie Theater on Mar 1, 2015 at 4:34 am

Gates Corgan was the architect of the Aggie Theatre. The house opened in mid-August, 1926.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Yam Theater on Mar 1, 2015 at 4:01 am

The Portales Mainstreet Program provides this web page about the Yam Theatre. It opened in 1926 as the Portola Theatre. In 1929 it was renamed the Palace Theatre, but was soon closed due to the depression. In February, 1932 the house was reopened by the Griffith Amusement Company and the original name Portola Theatre was restored.

In 1936, Griffith had the house extensively remodeled and extended rear of the building by 20 feet to accommodate more seats. It was at this time that the house was renamed the Yam Theatre. The architect for the project was Gates Corgan, who had been designing the Griffith chain’s theater projects for at least a decade.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Texan Theater on Mar 1, 2015 at 3:39 am

The June 10, 1933, issue of the Lubbock Morning Avalanch said that Gates Corgan, architect for the Griffith Amusement Company, would arrive in town the following day to oversee the remodeling of the building at 813 Broadway into a movie theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Aztec Theater on Mar 1, 2015 at 3:05 am

The Aztec Theatre is not on David and Noelle Soren’s list of known Boller Brothers theaters, though the list does include Enid’s Billings Theatre, opened in 1921. A December 30, 1930, article about the La Nora Theatre in the Pampa Sunday News-Post of Pampa, Texas, mentioned the Aztec Theatre in Enid as one of the other theaters designed by Gates Corgan, architect of the La Nora. Corgan was both the architect and the contractor for Griffith Amusement company projects from the mid 1920s until 1939.