Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 26 - 50 of 9,711 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Empress Theatre on Jan 19, 2015 at 8:21 pm

It was Thomas Henneberry who renamed the Majestic the Empress Theatre in 1917. In addition to the Empress Theatres at Osawatomie and at Paola, he also had an Empress Theatre at Eastland, Texas, which he sold in 1919.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Empress Theatre on Jan 18, 2015 at 9:20 am

A house called the Majestic Theatre was being mentioned The Osawatomie Graphic at least as early as 1910, but in 1917 it was renamed the Empress Theatre, and then a New Empress Theatre was built in 1921. I’ve found nothing about what then became of the old Majestic/Empress.

The 1927 FDY lists two theaters at Osawatomie: The 295-seat Empress and the 250-seat Peoples. In 1935, a house called the Zephyr Theatre opened in Osawatomie. Later that year the Zephyr was renamed the Kansan. There is always the possibility that the Majestic became the Peoples, and then maybe the Zephyr/Kansan as well, but I haven’t been able to establish a connection. For now I’d have to say that the Majestic/first Empress might have closed permanently in 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Osawa Theatre on Jan 18, 2015 at 9:08 am

Prior to 1939, when it was remodeled by Corgan & Moore and renamed, the Osawa Theatre was called the Dickinson Theatre. What I have not been able to determine is whether the Dickinson, which is mentioned in The Film Daily as early as 1932, was the house originally opened in 1921 as the New Empress Theatre, which had vanished from the listings by the time the Dickinson appeared. If the Dickinson was the former Empress then it was expanded at some point, as the Empress had only 295 seats and the Dickinson was listed with 566.

The February 23, 1955, issue of The Film Bulletin said that the world premier of the movie Seven Angry Men would take place in Osawatomie, but didn’t give the name of the theater. It was most likely the Osawa, though, as the Kansan, if it was even still open at that time, was considerably smaller.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Performing Arts Center on Jan 18, 2015 at 6:36 am

Linkrot repair: here is the new location of the 1961 Boxoffice piece with the drawing of the Roger Sherman Theatre’s new front.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Marvel Cinema on Jan 18, 2015 at 12:48 am

The Marvel Cinema in Carlinville ran its last movies on February 27, 2014, according to an article in the Macoupin County-Carlinville Daily Enquirer-Democrat of March 6 that year. The last operator, Dougherty Theatres, made the decision to close the house as it was unable to pay for operations and upkeep with the level of patronage the theater was getting. The Paul family still owns the Marvel building, and it might be sold or leased at some future date.

Daugherty, which operates theaters in Jerseyville and Litchfield, plans an expansion of their two-screen Stadium Theatre in Jerseyville. The Marvel was remodeled by Dougherty Theatres in 2011, and digital equipment was installed, but the equipment might belong to Dougherty Theatres. If it does, I’d expect it to be removed to be used in the new Jerseyville auditorium, which would reduce the already slim likelihood of the Marvel ever reopening.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Westside Cinema on Jan 18, 2015 at 12:37 am

The Westside Cinema is operated by Dougherty Theatres, which also operates the Stadium Theatre in Jerseyville. Here is the Westside’s web site. A 2009 article in the Litchfiled Journal-News said that ground was broken for the Westside Cinema in 1985, at the time the Capitol Theatre was being demolished. The house opened as the Westside Twin Cinema.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Stadium Theatre on Jan 18, 2015 at 12:29 am

The Stadium Theatre is now operated by Dougherty Theatres, also operating the Westside Cinema in Litchfield. The company is planning to add a third screen to the Stadium.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Jan 18, 2015 at 12:18 am

Here is a March, 1985, photo of the Capitol Theatre from American Classic Images.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Marvel Cinema on Jan 17, 2015 at 3:50 am

The December 25, 1926, issue of The Reel Journalhad a story about the fire at the Marvel Theatre:

“TO INVESTIGATE SHOW FIRE IN CARLINVILLE

“The Illinois State Fire Marshall’s office will probably conduct an investigation into the fire which destroyed the Marvel Theatre in Carlinville, Ill., on December 18. The loss was placed at $60,000.

“It is suspected that the fire was of incendiary origin. Three years ago an attempt was made to set a fire to the theatre but the blaze was discovered before it could do serious damage.

“The Marvel owned and operated by Mrs. Freda Paul was supposedly of fireproof construction and was one of the finest theatres in that section of Illinois. It seated about 900 persons.

“Mrs. Paul plans to re-open her Grand Theatre until such time as the Marvel can be reconstructed.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Franklin Theater on Jan 17, 2015 at 2:32 am

The current home of the Franklin Institute (its third) opened in 1934 and was designed by architect John T. Windrim, who died that same year. I haven’t been able to find any details specifically about the Stearns Science Auditorium, but that it was renovated in 2003, and the name Franklin Theatre was adopted some time after that. Judging from the photo of the auditorium on the Franklin Institute’s web site, I’d guess the seating capacity to be no more than 250, all stadium style.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Denver Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 6:12 am

A promotional booklet published by the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago has a photo of the auditorium of the Metropolitan Theatre in Denver under construction at center left on this page. The caption attributes the design to architect William N. Bowman. He apparently designed the building the theater was in, while Rapp & Rapp designed the theater interior.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lerner Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 4:34 am

Broan’s link to the drawing of the Lerner Theatre is dead, so here is a fresh link. A photo of the Lerner appears at the bottom of this page of a promotional booklet published in the late 1920s by the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colonial Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 4:25 am

Photos of the Colonial are apparently scarce, but one corner of the auditorium is shown at upper left on this page of a promotional booklet published in the late 1920s by the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tower Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 4:19 am

A drawing of Toltz, King & Day’s Tower Theatre can be seen on this page of a promotional booklet from the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Michigan Theater on Jan 16, 2015 at 3:52 am

A photo of the Michigan Theatre can be seen at the bottom of this page of a promotional booklet published in the late 1920s by the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago. The Michigan Theatre was designed by architect Otto J. Kreig.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Tivoli Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 3:47 am

A 1923 photo of the Tivoli can be seen at the top of this page of a promotional booklet published by the Federal Cement Tile Co. in the late 1920s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capri Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 3:36 am

This web page says that the Capri opened in 1927 as the Logan Theatre and was renamed the Paradise after a renovation in 1933.

The Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago published a promotional booklet in the 1920s featuring photos of theaters that had roofs made of the company’s materials. The caption for the photo of this house (bottom of this page) calls it the Logan Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Radio Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 3:08 am

The Radio was one of the theaters featured in a promotional booklet published by the Federal Cement Tile Co. of Chicago in the 1920s. A photo of it can be seen at the bottom of this page. The Radio Theatre was designed by architect James C. Niemeyer.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Regent Theater on Jan 16, 2015 at 2:49 am

There is an early photo of the Regent Theatre on this page of a promotional booklet published by the Federal Cement Tile Company of Chicago in the 1920s.

The principals of the architectural firm were William B. Stratton and Dalton J. Von Schneider.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Aubert Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 2:33 am

The original architect of the Aubert Theatre was Paul Klingensmith. The Aubert was on a list of theaters in a booklet published by the Federal Concrete Tile Company, which features a photo of it at the bottom of this page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Midwest Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 1:30 am

An item in the November 28, 1925, issue of Motion Picture News listed the Midwest Theatre as one of three recently opened houses that had been designed by the firm of R. Levine & Co. Edward Rupert was one of the firm’s architects. The company was very active. One source I came across said that R. Levine & Co. built 27 theaters in 1926.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Villa Theater on Jan 16, 2015 at 1:18 am

An item in the November 28, 1925, issue of Motion Picture News listed the Milo Theatre as one of three houses recently opened that had been designed by R. Levine & Co.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Flamingo Theatre on Jan 16, 2015 at 12:37 am

This item appeared in the November 28, 1925, issue of Motion Picture News:

“Detroit — Plans are being prepared by E. J. Knopke, 1101 Lafayette Bldg., for erection of theatre bldg., stores and offices at Gratiot and 7 Mile Rd.”
This web page features an ad for Flamingo Hall, a ballroom and event center that occupied the building some time after the 1952 closing of the theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Madrid Theatre on Jan 15, 2015 at 10:09 pm

The November 28, 1925, issue of The Film Daily also notes DeFoe & Besecke as architects for a theater to be built on this block, though it gives the locations as 39th and Main Streets and the Madrid is closer to 38th Street. Original plans also called for more seats:

“Kansas City — DeFoe & Besecke, Archts., have completed plans for erection of theatre bldg. at 39th & Main Sts. on site 65 x 165. Seat. Cap. 3,000. Approx. Cost $200,000. Owner— R. L. Willis, 3804-06 Main St.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Beaver Theater on Jan 15, 2015 at 9:52 pm

I still don’t know if the Gem Theatre that Roy Jones sold to L. H. Chamberlain in 1930 was demolished, or merely expanded to accommodate the Masonic Lodge upstairs, or if the lodge and new theater were actually on a different site than the original theater, but the Gem could have been the house that was the subject of this item from the November 28, 1925, issue of The Film Daily:

“Des Moines — Plans are being drawn by W. D. Holtzman, 406 Flynn Bldg.. Archt., for erection of theatre bldg. and stores (2) on site 100 x 50 ft. to be erected on Beaver St. nr. Sheridan. Owner — R. G. Jones, c/o Archt.”
I don’t see the Gem listed in the 1927 FDY, but it’s possible that it opened under a different name.