Comments from Joe Vogel

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Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Amery Classic Theatre on Jul 6, 2016 at 10:43 pm

The September 5, 1936, issue of The Film Daily said this: “A. M. Paulson will start work on his new theater at Amery, Wis., on Oct. 1.”

According to a document about the Amery Classic Theatre from the Amery Area Historical Society (PDF here, the New Amery Theatre opened on December 11, 1936. It had been built for Alfred M. Paulson, who had taken over the town’s earlier theater, the Gem, in 1934.

The building was designed by a local craftsman and self-taught architect, Emil Klinger (the document says Klingler, but other sources all say Klinger) who later established an architectural practice in Eau Claire.

As of this date, the Amery Classic Theatre is still dark, the last events noted on the web site having taken place in 2015.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gard Theater on Jul 6, 2016 at 8:42 pm

For those who might be interested, here is a brief biography of Robert E. Gard, for whom the Gard Theatre was named. A significant figure in the community theater movement in the United States, and in the promotion of the arts in small towns, he was long associated with the University of Wisconsin.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about S.V.A. Theatre on Jul 6, 2016 at 7:54 pm

The image of The Three Stooges arriving at the premier of an Orson Welles movie based on a novel by Kafka is one of the most astonishing I have ever encountered. After such an eye-poke of a revelation, I’m sure my own childhood will never look quite the same to me again. Woowoowoo.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bluffs Theatre on Jul 6, 2016 at 6:16 am

This article about the Platte Valley’s theater history, from the January 3, 2016, issue of the Scottsbluff Star-Herald says that this house opened in 1915 as the Queen Theatre and was renamed the Orpheum a few months later.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Oto Theater on Jul 6, 2016 at 6:05 am

The correct spelling of this theater’s name is Oto. It was named for the Native American tribe who once inhabited the region.

According to this article about the area’s theater history from the January 3, 2016, issue of the Scottsbluff Star-Herald, the building was erected in 1926 as a ballroom called Danceland, and was later converted into a theater.

An article in the January 14, 1962, issue of The Lincoln Star reported that the Midwest Amusement Company had recently sold the Midwest, Bluffs, and Oto Theatres in Scotsbluff to the Commonwealth Amusement Company of Kansas City. The Grove Theatre in nearby Gering was also sold.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Egyptian Theatre on Jul 6, 2016 at 5:30 am

This article about the Scottsbluff area’s theater history, from the Scottsbluff Star-Herald of January 3, 2016, notes that the Egyptian Theatre opened in October, 1927.

An accompanying photo shows a remnant of the Egyptian’s decoration that still exists on an interior wall of the Midwest Theatre, so at least part of the original building must have survived the March 5, 1945, fire to be incorporated into the new theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gard Theater on Jul 4, 2016 at 10:00 am

The February 11, 1922, issue of The Capital Times of Madison, Wisconsin, noted that the new Post-Cammack Theatre in Spring Green had formally opened the previous Thursday, February 9.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Woods Theatre on Jul 2, 2016 at 5:26 am

This item is from the July 21, 1931, issue of The Film Daily:

“Cordele, Ga. — F. J. Wood, owner of Wood’s theater, Vienna, Ga., assumed management last week of the Circle here which he recently purchased.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Moulin Rouge Theatre on Jul 1, 2016 at 3:26 am

The July 13, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald noted quite a few new cinema projects planned, underway, or recently completed across the United States, which was in an accelerating economic recovery, but the news from economic laggard France was not so good:

“Ostensibly a summer closing move, the two largest halls of the Paris Pathe Natan Circuit now are dark, the Empire Cinema-Music Hall and the Moulin Rouge. The Empire (3,000 seats) had a combination cinema and variety policy and had been managed by Pathe Natan for one year. The Moulin Rouge (2,200 seats), former music hall where Mistinguett was a star, has been a cinema since 1929. It had been managed by Pathe Natan since 1930. The closing comes at a time when Pathe Natan is awaiting a general reorganization.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Regal Theatre on Jul 1, 2016 at 2:51 am

This Rootsweb page has a brief history of the Regal Theatre. It was built around 1920 at 225 E. Main Street by Walter Burlinger. It was later bought by W.A. Collins. In 1930 and airdome was added (Probably cheaper than installing and operating air conditioning during the hot summers) which operated for about three years.

In 1936 Collins sold the house to the Lead Belt Amusement Company. After changing hands a couple of more times, the Regal Theatre was destroyed by a fire on January 8, 1955.

Something the history doesn’t mention is that in 1935 the July 13 issue of Motion Picture Herald announced that Mr. Collins was planning to build a new Regal Theatre, and bids were soon to be taken on the project. As the history doesn’t mention this, it’s likely that the project wasn’t carried out. Possibly the bids were too high.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about DeKalb Theatre on Jul 1, 2016 at 2:19 am

The July 13, 1935, issue of Motion Picture Herald had this item:

“Colonel Thomas E. Orr, operator of several houses in northern Alabama, opened a new one at Fort Payne, Ala., known as the DeKalb.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rivoli Theatre on Jun 30, 2016 at 4:53 am

The March 3, 1923, issue of The Moving Picture World reported that former Tampa exhibitor W. H. Carroll had recently purchased the Rivoli Theatre at Douglas, Georgia, and the Colonial Theatre at Vidalia.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lindsey Theatre on Jun 30, 2016 at 4:28 am

This house opened in 1940 as the New Lindsey Theatre. An earlier Lindsey Theatre had opened in 1917.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cactus Theatre on Jun 30, 2016 at 4:22 am

The Cactus Theatre was opened as part of an expansion of the Texas-based Griffith Amusement Company. The September 1, 1934, issue of Motion Picture Herald listed the New Cactus Theatre in Carlsbad as one of three new houses recently opened by the chain.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Clifton Theater on Jun 30, 2016 at 3:51 am

The Palace Theatre was remodeled and enlarged in 1934. The July 22 issue of the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal said that the formal opening was to take place the following night. Plans for the project had been prepared by local architect O.R. Walker.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rex Theater on Jun 30, 2016 at 2:24 am

In 1934 the Rex Theatre was taken over by the Griffith Amusement Company, according to the September 1 issue of Motion Picture Herald.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Princess Theatre on Jun 29, 2016 at 4:11 am

A 1940s photo of Fifth Avenue showing the Princess Theatre accompanies this article from the April 11, 2016, issue of the Mount Dora Citizen. The article is about the lengthy permitting process for the proposed 12-screen EPIC theaters multiplex set to begin construction this year. The Mount Dora-Eustis area has been without a movie theater since the closing of the Eustis Plaza Twin in July, 1996. The Princess had closed in the 1970s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Majestic Theater on Jun 29, 2016 at 2:58 am

The Majestic was enlarged and remodeled in late 1936, as described in this item from the January 2, 1937, issue of The Film Daily:

“Ellwood City, Pa. — Andy and Frank Biordi have remodeled their Majestic at a cost of more than $25,000. A complete new interior and a new marquee have been erected. A five-room apartment atop the theater has been dismantled and a balcony added. The auditorium was also reseated for increased capacity. Installations include new lighting fixtures, projection equipment and a sound system. W. Naidenoff of Pittsburgh was the decorator.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Palace Theatre on Jun 29, 2016 at 2:22 am

The “Theater Improvements” column of the January 2, 1937, issue of The Film Daily said that new sound equipment had been installed in the Palace Theatre at Hazlehurst, Georgia.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mayes Theatre on Jun 29, 2016 at 1:47 am

This web page features a few photos of the side wall of the building once occupied by the Mayes Theatre. At some point a Coca-Cola sign on the wall was restored, and the ghost of the theater’s sign was painted over with a sign reading “Welcome to Maysville.”

Sadly, this Flickr photouploaded on July 15, 2008, by Amber Rhea, shows that the midsection of the roof of the theater had collapsed. The most recent Google Maps street view shows that the building has since been demolished.

The Mayes Theatre was located on the west side of the 9100 block of Gillsville Road (GA-52) south of Brevard Street. Most of the remaining buildings on the block show evidence of recent renovation. It’s unfortunate that the theater fell down when it did, or it might have been renovated too. Or perhaps the loss of the theater building was what moved the local folk to get to work preserving what remained of their architectural heritage.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Orpheum Theatre on Jun 28, 2016 at 3:58 am

This page at the Phoenix Opera web site says that the Orpheum has 1,364 seats, 1,062 on the orchestra floor and 302 in the balcony. There’s a link for downloading a seating chart in PDF format.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Opera Block on Jun 27, 2016 at 9:46 am

Aune and Overby were not architects. They owned and operated the theater, along with a saloon. According to a survey of Washburn’s historic resources, the architect of the 1888 rebuild of the Opera House Block was W. H. Webster, of the Ashland, Wisconsin firm of Webster & Dodge. The rebuilding was done in the popular Romanesque Revival style.

The theater was listed in the 1912-1913 Cahn guide as the Washburn Opera House. The ground floor of the building is still standing, though altered, but the second floor, which contained the Opera House, has been entirely obliterated. The truncated building is at the southeast corner of E. Bayfield St. and 1st Ave. E..

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hitching Post Theatre on Jun 27, 2016 at 8:23 am

Addendum: Check Bill Counter’s Hitching Post page for an accurate history, including its brief listing as the Western Theatre and then Riviera Theatre before finally returning to its original name before closing.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pastime Theatre on Jun 24, 2016 at 1:43 am

Wide Screen equipment was installed in the Pastime Theatre at Horicon in 1956, according to an item in the April 7 issue of Boxoffice. The house had also been redecorated. The Pastime was in operation at least as early as 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Fox Theater on Jun 20, 2016 at 10:49 am

The Fox Theatre at Minco, Oklahoma, is mentioned in the May 21, 1936, issue of The Film Daily.

A house in Minco called the Royal Theatre is mentioned in the July 24, 1934, issue of the same publication. The 1933 FDY gives the seating of the Royal as 275. This might have been an earlier name for the Fox, or the Fox might have been the new theater that was listed as under construction in the 1936 FDY. The Fox’s building as seen in our vintage photo looks much older than 1936, though, so it was either an earlier theater that was rebuilt that year, or the conversion of an existing building from some other use.

In 1962, A Roy Kendrick of the Star Theatre in Minco was providing capsule movie reviews to the “Exhibitor Has His Say” section of Boxoffice. It’s possible that the Star was the Fox, renamed. Minco is never listed in the trades as having more than about 950 people, so was probably always a one-theater town.