Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 26 - 50 of 8,442 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Valentine Theatre on Apr 11, 2014 at 2:02 pm

14 S. Oak Street looks to be a fairly modern building. Its facade is set back a bit from the sidewalk and there is a balcony at the second floor. It’s possible that a new front was built onto an old building, but it’s also possible that the Valentine Theatre building has been demolished and replaced.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Apr 11, 2014 at 1:46 pm

Google’s camera car didn’t travel along 11th Street, so I’ve set Street View to look along the block. The State Theatre was in the first building facing 11th Street, next to the small park on the corner. The Avalon Theatre was in the third building on the block.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avalon Theatre on Apr 11, 2014 at 1:41 pm

Google’s camera car didn’t travel along 11th Street. The Avalon Theatre is the middle building of the five facing 11th (the lowest one.) The State Theatre was in the first.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Clifton 5 on Apr 11, 2014 at 1:29 pm

In late 1930, two of Huntingdon’s movie theaters suffered major fires. This item is from the Janaury 2, 1931, issue of The Film Daily:

“Huntingdon, Pa. — The Grand, closed for months following a fire, will be reopened about Feb. 1 by the Patriotic Order Sons of America, with Western Electric equipment. The Clifton was destroyed by fire recently.”
The March 5 issue of the same publication noted that the POSA had sold the Grand Theatre to A. N. Notopolous. The reopening of the Clifton Theatre was noted in the May 24 issue, in which it was listed as new theater. As it had taken over four months to get the Clifton reopened, the damage must have been quite extensive.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pacific Culver Stadium 12 on Apr 11, 2014 at 11:41 am

Linkrot repair: Architects Benson & Bohl have reconfigured their web site. Photos of the Pacific Culver Stadium 12 can now be found at this link.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Regal Oceanside 16 on Apr 11, 2014 at 11:23 am

Linkrot repair: Benson & Bohl have reconfigured their web site. Photos of the Regal Cinemas in Oceanside are now here.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Century Riverside 12 on Apr 11, 2014 at 11:17 am

It’s possible that Century took over the project after the Regal signage had been installed but before the theaters had opened. That view with the crowd out front does look like it would be opening night, but it might be one of those very realistic digital renderings. In the daylight photo with the Regal name on the building it doesn’t look like the theater is open.

Benson & Bohl reconfigured their web site and the link I posted earlier no longer works. Maybe this one will stick around longer.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victoria Theater on Apr 11, 2014 at 9:47 am

Thanks, Stick82. We mistakenly had the State listed on Oak Street. Now we can surmise that it’s address was probably 3 S. Hickory. If you would like to comment on the State Theatre, there is a link to its Cinema Treasures page in the “Nearby Theaters” field on the right side of this page. There is also a page for the Hollywood Theatre, and we just added a page for the Theatorium, with a couple of vintage photos from 1913 (though I don’t suppose you’d be old enough to remember that long-gone theater, which was probably closed by 1929.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Theatorium on Apr 11, 2014 at 9:35 am

The building now at 112 S. Oak Street is probably the same building the Theatorium occupied, but William Harold Lee’s fancy facade, which can be seen in one of the 1913 photos I just uploaded, has been removed, probably in the late 1920s. It was probably considered too elaborate for ordinary retail use.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theater on Apr 11, 2014 at 9:17 am

Stick82 says the State Theatre fronted on Hickory, the second building from the corner. The most likely address was thus 3 South Hickory Street.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avalon Theatre on Apr 10, 2014 at 7:32 pm

The May 21, 1936, issue of The Film Daily said that the Avalon Theatre in Lawrenceville, Illinois, had been transfered to D. Frisina by Mrs. Hurley Gould.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Apr 10, 2014 at 7:20 pm

This weblog post from the Lawrence County Historical Society has two photos of the Avalon Theatre at 716 11th Street. The second of them is a view looking north along the east side of 11th Street toward State Street. I believe the Palace Theatre is in the last building on the block. There is a marquee and vertical sign, but I can’t quite make out the name on the vertical. That building must be at 710 11th Street, though, as it is about three doors north of the Avalon.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avalon Theatre on Apr 10, 2014 at 7:16 pm

This weblog post from the Lawrence County Historical Society is titled Hurley Gould – Moving Picture Theatre Owner. Mrs. Gould owned a number of theaters in and around Lawrence, including the Avalon. There are two photos of the Avalon near the end of the post. The first must be from 1941, the year The Lady Eve was released. Judging from the parked cars, the second is from the 1920s.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victoria Theater on Apr 10, 2014 at 4:08 pm

Stick82: Did the State Theatre front on Third Street, or on Hickory Street like the Post Office does?

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theater on Apr 10, 2014 at 4:06 pm

This weblog post at Coal Region Notebook says that the State Theatre was at the southeast corner of Third and Hickory Streets. This comment by Stick82 on our Victoria Theatre page says that the State was located where the Post Office is now. The Post Office is indeed at the southeast corner of E. Third and Hickory Streets. The Post Office is at 1 S. Hickory, but I don’t know which street the theater fronted on.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Victoria Theater on Apr 10, 2014 at 3:47 pm

This weblog post has two small photos of the Victoria Theatre. The building extend along W. Third Street from Pear Street to Maple Street, but the entrance was at the corner of Pear Street (which looks more like an alley to me.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Odyssey Cinema on Apr 10, 2014 at 1:42 pm

I think 1971 would have been too late. I wonder if somebody else ran a movie theater in the space before Odyssey moved in? That grille really looks familiar.

The thing with Google’s street views is very odd. The restaurant our image is trapped in isn’t even at the right address, and the address works fine at Google Maps itself. It must be some sort of error in their software that fetches the image to embed in our page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Boulevard Cinemas on Apr 10, 2014 at 7:16 am

This web page by architect Steven Ohlhaber has information about the Boulevard Cinemas. Ohlhaber was project architect for Strauss Architects (now SDG Architects,) designers of the building shell. The theater interior was designed by The Henry Architects, Seattle.

The Boulevard Cinemas project consisted of a large existing warehouse building with a modern addition. The large auditoriums are in the new part of the complex and the smaller auditoriums in the remodeled warehouse.

The page has several photos, but I find the application displaying them a bit cranky, creating double exposures (or maybe it’s just my browser.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Odyssey Cinema on Apr 10, 2014 at 6:16 am

I think I might have been to this theater, but if I was it was probably no later than 1969, and maybe a year or two earlier. All I recall of the night is that a group of friends took me to see a revival of that version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in which Mickey Rooney played Puck. I remember it being a tiny storefront theater on the south side of Hollywood Boulevard some distance east of the freeway.

It was on the ground floor of a fairly large old building, and I think there was some fancy grillwork over the storefront such as this building has. If it wasn’t this theater, then there was another, similar storefront house somewhere along this stretch of the boulevard around the same time. I have no memory of the theater’s name, though.

(Here is a street view. The one on our page is trapped in a restaurant in the next block and you can’t get to the street from it. I’ve seen this Street View glitch on a couple of other Cinema Treasures pages recently, but I can’t remember which ones. It’s very annoying.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Sterling Cinemas on Apr 10, 2014 at 5:35 am

The web site of Seattle architectural firm The Henry Architects lists the Sterling Cinema 6 in San Bernardino as one of their projects. There is one photo of it in their slide show.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Camera 7 Pruneyard on Apr 10, 2014 at 5:23 am

The web site of Seattle architectural firm The Henry Architects lists the Pruneyard Cinema 7 as one of their projects. There is one photo of it on their slide show.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about CineLux Tennant Station Stadium 11 on Apr 10, 2014 at 5:19 am

The web site of Seattle architectural firm The Henry Architects lists the CineLux Tenant Station 11 as one of their projects. There is one photo of it in their slide show.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Avery Theatre on Apr 9, 2014 at 7:11 pm

The Avery Theatre is open again, showing movies seven nights a week, with a matinée on Sunday.

This is their web site.

The Avery Theatre was designed by St. Paul, Minnesota, architect Henry E. Waldron, of the Sperry Realty Company. The theater was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2008.

The Avery’s web site has information about the history of the house and the renovation process. A drop-down menu from the ABOUT on the main page has a link headed RESTORATION PROCESS, and that page has a link from which to download a PDF of the NRHP Registration form, which contains several historic photos.

The page also has a link to a time line of the restoration, and at the end of the time line are links to PDFs of the two parts of a tabloid published by The Leader, the local newspaper, at the time of the theater’s reopening in August, 2013. These contain several photos of the renovation as well as additional historic photos of the theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Apr 8, 2014 at 1:27 pm

My links in the previous comment are not going directly to the pages. The ca.1918 postcard with the “It” Theatre is at result 5 of the 8, and the 1939 photo of the Strand is at result 7.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Apr 8, 2014 at 1:25 pm

An article in the March 15, 1965, issue of the Hagerstown, Maryland, Daily Mail said that the Strand Theatre Building in Waynesboro had been gutted by a fire. The building, it said, was nearly 100 years old, and had not been used as a theater since the 1940s.

The Strand Theatre was in operation by 1924, when the Cumberland Valley Volunteer Firefighters Association held its 23rd annual meeting there.

A small photo on page 183 of Waynesboro as We Knew it, by Todd Andrew Dorsett, (Google Books preview) shows Main Street east from Center Square in 1939. The Strand was in the building at the northeast corner of the square. The lower floor is obscured by a bus in the photo, but the theater’s vertical sign can be seen (though not easily read.)

Another page of Dorsett’s book (I hope this link goes right to it) has a ca.1918 postcard view east across Center Square, and the site of the Strand is occupied by an earlier theater called the “It” (the name usually appears in quotes in old publications.) The “It” Theatre first appears by name in the trade publications in 1910, but this item from the May 22, 1909, issue of The Moving Picture World is probably about it:

“Waynesboro, Pa.—Cashier W. H. Gelbach, of the Citizens Bank, has contracted with A. R. Warner for the building of a new moving picture theater on Center Square.”
In the 1918 postcard the “It” Theatre occupies a building with a gabled end facing the square rather than the two-story flat-roofed structure which had the Strand’s entrance, but if the report of the fire in the 1965 Daily Mail article is correct, and the Strand’s building was then almost 100 years old, it must have been the same building.

The last mention I’ve found in the trade magazines of the “It” Theatre is this item from The Moving Picture World of April 6, 1918:

“Theater at Waynesboro Sold.

“Waynesboro, Pa. — The ‘It’ theater, in this city, for some time owned by John Karper, has changed hands, having been purchased by Watson & Daley of Hagerstown, Md. The management of the ‘It’ was assumed by Watson & Daley on March 16. After extensive repairs and improvements they will add a program of vaudeville to the moving pictures.”

I’ve tried to find a connection between Watson and Daley and the Strand Theatre, but failed. In fact the only mention of the Strand I’ve found is a brief mention in The Film Daily in 1943. Still I think it very likely that the Strand was the “It” Theatre remodeled and renamed.