Comments from Coate

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Coate
Coate commented about Century Plaza Cinemas on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:40 pm

“This theater will always have a warm place in my heart. I would take the bus from the San Gabriel valley all the way out to the Century Plaza to see "Star Wars”. They ran it in 70mm for what seemed like eternity.“ (mattepntr, Oct 9, 2004)


The Century Plaza’s “Star Wars” engagement ran from 6 July 1977 – 12 Apr 1978 and 8 May 1978 – 7 Sep 1978. The theater interrupted their first-run showings during 13 Apr – 7 May 1978 so they could host the annual FILMEX festival.

Coate
Coate commented about National Theatre on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:25 pm

The National was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about UA Galaxy on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:23 pm

The UA Galaxy was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Pacific's Hastings 8 on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:22 pm

Hastings was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about UA Emery Bay Theater on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:19 pm

The UA Emery Bay was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Century Cinema on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:18 pm

The Cinema (as it was then known) was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about UA Sheepshead Bay Stadium 14 on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:16 pm

The UA Sheepshead bay was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Picture Show at Main Place on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:12 pm

The MainPlace was among the handful of theaters equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Edwards Big Newport 6 on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:11 pm

The Edwards Newport Cinema (“Big” Newport, screen #1) was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about AMC Century 14 on Jun 29, 2005 at 10:09 pm

The AMC Century 14 was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Coronet Theatre on Jun 29, 2005 at 9:28 pm

The Coronet was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about TCL Chinese Theatre on Jun 29, 2005 at 9:26 pm

The Chinese was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about iPic Westwood on Jun 29, 2005 at 9:21 pm

The Avco was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Cinerama Dome and ArcLight Cinemas on Jun 29, 2005 at 9:19 pm

The Cinerama Dome was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Jun 29, 2005 at 9:17 pm

The Ziegfeld was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats.

Coate
Coate commented about Camelot Cinemas on Jun 29, 2005 at 8:38 am

“What model is the Barco projector in #1” (ShaneRoach, May 23, 2005)


According to dcinematoday.com, screen #1 at the Camelot is equipped with a Barco D-Cine DP100 (which is a current-generation projector with 2K resolution).

For those who may be curious or have an interest in this subject, here is a link to a list of worldwide venues showing “Episode III” in D-Cinema. Note that in some respects the list is a work-in-progress and in some locations the D-Cinema engagement has ended.

View link

Coate
Coate commented about Lenox Square Theatre on Jun 29, 2005 at 5:20 am

Lenox Square was among the handful of theaters that was equipped with Cinema Digital Sound (CDS), the 1990-1991 precursor to the contemporary digital sound formats: Dolby Digital, DTS, and SDDS.

Coate
Coate commented about La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts on Jun 27, 2005 at 5:16 pm

Another possible correction: I think the theater being described here opened in 1962 and was initially run by Stanley-Warner.

Coate
Coate commented about Cinema 46 on Jun 27, 2005 at 8:15 am

I stayed at that Holiday Inn for a couple of nights during a visit last summer!

The theater details at the top of the page indicate the place has been demolished but someone mentioned to me that they thought the building is now a Staples or Office Depot, and I remember one of those types of places next to the hotel. Can anyone clarify?

Coate
Coate commented about Cine Capri Theatre on Jun 27, 2005 at 4:26 am

Another Cine Capri/“Star Wars” tidbit…

Variety, 12 July 1978:
“13 Months, $3-Mil: ‘Star Wars’ Ends Arizona Record”

Fox’s “Star Wars” has cracked all previous records for consecutive showings for a film in Arizona. The Cine Capri in Phoenix has given five daily performances for 13 months. The showings brought in some 850,000 viewers yielding receipts of approximately $3,000,000.

The 800-seat cinema, under the banner of the Plitt Intermountain chain, used up three prints of the film and augmented the soundtrack with additional Dolby Stereo.

Closing date for “Star Wars” is now July 20, to be succeeded by Fox’s “Damien: Omen II.”

Coate
Coate commented about Criterion Theatre on Jun 26, 2005 at 1:11 pm

“May 25,1979 when Fox opened ‘Alien’ it was only at 70mm houses.” (RobertR, Jun 15, 2005)


This is only partially correct. Most of the initial engagements were 70mm, including all of the NYC area showings. San Diego showed it in 35mm, and other markets had 70mm and 35mm showings. This is explained in detail in this article:
View link

Re the Criterion, there are photos from the the “Alien” engagement on the “Alien Quadrilogy” DVD.

Coate
Coate commented about Closter Cinema 4 on Jun 25, 2005 at 5:50 am

Theater opened August 1, 1963 by Skouras. Debut attraction was “55 Days At Peking.”

Coate
Coate commented about Rivoli Theatre on Jun 24, 2005 at 10:56 pm

“I’ll clear up one matter which I have mentioned on other sites.
My neice was visting me and playing on the Dell under my name andsaw the listing of my book so she said she’s give a review. It wasoriginally poster under her name but then for whatever reason, it was changed to my name. At first I thought it was amusing but then gotnegative feedback from it so I’m glad it was removed. Other reviews by her are listed under her name elsewhere I believe. So much for that.” (Richard W. Haine, Jun 18, 2005)


Yeah, right! And James Bond is a virgin.

Coate
Coate commented about Paramount Theatre on Jun 24, 2005 at 4:45 am

“The last movie to play the Paramount was ‘Thunderball’ which…played continuously 24 hours a day for the first three weeks.” (Orlando, Feb 27, 2004)

“ ‘Thunderball’ was released in December, 1965, nearly a year and a half after ‘The Carpetbaggers’ closed at the Paramount. I don’t recall ‘Thunderball’ playing there…” (Warren, Feb 27, 2004)

“Could it have been ‘Goldfinger’ not ‘Thunderball’, you were thinking of? Because ‘Goldfinger’ had special 24 hour a day screenings when it opened in the city. And it was released a year earlier than ‘Thunderball’.” (William, Feb 27, 2004)

“I remember ‘Thunderball’ having a special engagement at the Paramount.” (p7350, Feb 27, 2004)


Consulting The New York Times on microfilm can help sort this out….

Both “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball” had special 24-hour round-the-clock Manhattan screenings.

“Goldfinger” opened on Dec. 22, 1964 exclusively at the DeMille and the Coronet. Between Dec. 23, 1965 – Jan. 2, 1965, the DeMille featured round-the-clock screenings.

“James Bond Now In Action 24 Hours A Day — Due to the incredible crowds that stormed the doors of the DeMille Theatre yesterday, opening day, the management announces that the following extraordinary, unprecedented schedule is now in effect for the showings of ‘Goldfinger’: The DeMille Theatre will remain open 24 hours a day…so that all who wish to follow the latest exploits of Agent 007 will have unlimited opportunity to do so.”

As for “Thunderball,” this opened Dec. 21, 1965 on a United Artists Premiere Showcase simultaneously in nearly 30 greater New York City area theaters. The Manhattan engagements were held at the Paramount, Sutton, and Cinema II. The Paramount stayed open 24 hours a day to show the movie round-the-clock.

Coate
Coate commented about Cine Capri Theatre on Jun 22, 2005 at 10:56 pm

Channing,
If you’re remembering your opening day experience as being “high-fidelity” then this would suggest a stereo presentation, and “LOUD!” would suggest six-track magnetic from a 70mm print. Perhaps.

But… I’ve performed a considerable amount of research on the topic of this movie and the results of this work suggest to me that, contrary to the memories of many, many folks, most presentations of “Star Wars” in 1977 were mono.

My reasons for believing the Cine Capri began showing “Star Wars” in mono are due to the following:

1) No presentation format notations present in the Phoenix area newspaper advertisements.

2) Beginning in September 1977, four months after the release, notations for a 70mm and six-track Dolby Stereo presentation began to appear in the newspaper ads.

3) Access to Dolby Labs' installation records reveal an install date of September 1977 for a Dolby CP100 unit.

4) A Dolby trade ad which reproduced a list of the original opening engagements and their opening-day box office tally included check marks next to those engagements presented in Dolby Stereo. The Phoenix entry was left unmarked.

5) Trade press during the initial weeks of the movie’s release indicated the availability of eight 70mm prints. I have the original newspaper ads specific to each market for each of the 43 original engagements and the 70mm notations add up to eight…and they were booked into theatres in the Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco markets.

6) I’m unaware of any stereo sound systems that were compatible with Dolby prints having been available in spring 1977. Perhaps there were some, but basic business sense would question why there would be competition for a yet-to-be-successful company.

7) With the exception of the optical mono prints that circulated, I’m unaware of any non-Dolby-encoded 70mm prints made available for this movie for the U.S. If there were in fact non-Dolby 70mm prints, that is what the Cine Capri may have received and what you may have experienced. But then the print number reference in the trades would not be correct AND why wouldn’t the theatre advertise a 70mm and/or stereo presentation AND why would the Cine Capri four months later tout how their presentation was “Now in 70mm…”?

8) I understand that the genuine mono prints were not available until a few weeks after the film’s release. So, this would suggest the initial mono presentations were from a Dolby print. In other words, I am under the impression that the Cine Capri received a 35mm optical Dolby Stereo print…but not having the ability to play it in stereo through a Dolby processor since they had not yet installed such a unit. Perhaps one of the projectionists or Plitt engineers fussed with their system and somehow managed to derive some form of stereo out of it. Just a guess, but that explanation seems to be the only way both of us can be correct.