Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 201 - 225 of 10,825 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Garrick Theatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 7:53 pm

The text does not identify it, and the distinctive vertical sign is seen from edge-on, but I’m sure that this 1934 photo depicts the Garrick Theatre. The marquee and the shape of the parapet are recognizable from the photo I linked to in the second comment back.

A PDF from Iron Range Jewish Heritage says that the Garrick Theatre opened in 1921 in the building that by 1939 had become the Maco Theatre, so we have one source saying that they were the same theater.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyric Theatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 5:36 pm

The papers of the Minneapolis architectural firm Kees & Colburn, part of the Northwest Architectural Archives at the Elmer Anderson Library of the University of Minnesota, include a set of blueprints for the Blue Mouse Theatre, dated 1920. I don’t know if Kees & Colburn had any hand in designing the house, or if the firm just acted as supervising architects for the out-of-town designer, Harry Lawrie. I do know that Kees & Colburn’s style tended toward Classical/Beaux Arts rather than the Gothic look of the Blue Mouse.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Garrick Theatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 4:59 pm

I’ve come across something interesting but inconclusive. The finding aid to the Liebenberg & Kaplan papers has two entries for the Maco Theatre. One, undated, lists the blueprints for the project. The other, headed “Maco 1920, 1937-38” lists a pencil drawing. In that entry the architect field says “Libenberg and Kaplan (Kees and Colburn),” which I would take to mean that the Garrick was designed (and perhaps built) in 1920, and designed by the Minneapolis firm of Kees & Colburn (Frederick Kees and Serenus Colburn.)

The 1937-38 suggests plans for a remodeling by Liebenberg & Kaplan at that time, but the undated entry with blueprints suggests that the remodeling might have been abandoned in favor of entirely new construction. The introduction to the L&K papers finding aid says that the Maco was a 1940 project, but doesn’t cite a source for the claim. Again, I’m still not sure if the Garrick was demolished or just rebuilt as the Maco, but at least now we know the original architects of the Garrick.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about LoringTheatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 4:25 pm

I was unable to find this house with Cinema Treasures' internal search using just the name Loring. I think it’s because the words Loring and Theatre are run together in the page title. If you run them together in the search box, search finds the page, but it would be better to separate the words.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Miles Theater on Apr 23, 2016 at 3:58 pm

According to this page at Historic Detroit, the Miles Theatre was opened on May 15, 1910, ran its last show on Nov. 28, 1927, and was demolished around May, 1928, to make way for the Griswold Building, which is still standing.

The Miles Theatre was designed by the Minneapolis architectural firm Kees & Colburn (Franklin Kees and Serenus Colburn.)

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Garrick Theatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 3:16 pm

This web page with a history of Virginia says that the Garrick Theatre was the predecessor of the Maco Theatre. A photo from the 1920s shows the front of the Garrick, and several of the buildings on the block are still recognizable in modern Google street view. The perspective of the vintage photo is a bit different, but it does look as though the entrance of the Garrick was in the same spot as the entrance of the Maco, and so would have the same address, 415 Chestnut Street.

What I haven’t been able to figure out is if the Maco was entirely new construction or an extensive rebuild of the Garrick. The seating capacity of both houses was about the same (700+), so the auditoriums probably occupied the same footprint. I’ll see if I can dig up more information, but in the meantime at least we have an address for the Garrick.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Grand Theater on Apr 23, 2016 at 2:30 pm

The building occupied by the Grand Theatre in our vintage photo was still standing when Google’s camera car last passed by, but might be no longer. In the current street view it was occupied by a shop called Wild Eyes Pets and Exotics, 430 Chestnut Street, which has since moved to a new location.

The facade of old theater building was looking pretty rough when the street view was made, and it’s possible that it has since been demolished. It is also possible that the roughness was due to restoration work, as the roof looked pretty sound in the satellite view. We’ll probably have to wait until someone visits the location, or Google’s camera car returns and updates the view, before we know the fate of the Grand Theatre building.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Bijou Theater on Apr 23, 2016 at 2:09 pm

Several of the buildings in this block look about the same in modern Google street view as they did in the vintage photo we have. The building the Bijou was in is now occupied by a quick print shop called Copy Magic, located at 428 Chestnut Street.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Granada Theatre on Apr 23, 2016 at 1:55 pm

The January 28, 1950, issue of Boxoffice had a brief article saying that an antitrust suit had been filed against major film producers and distributors by “…Rose and Lewis Deutsch, owners of the Granada Theatre in Virginia, Minnesota, a 630-seat house built in 1936.”

The Deutsch’s had difficulty obtaining films on opening the theater in 1936 until they signed an agreement with the dominant regional exhibitor, Minnesota Amusement Company, which allowed them to get first run or second run product, but only if their partners got the biggest share of the revenues (this was a very common situation for independent theater operators to be in during that time.)

When the agreement ended in 1946, the Deutsch’s were again unable to get first run product. Their lawsuit claimed that, due to collusion between producers, distributors, and the Minnesota Amusement Company, the Deutsches had suffered $75,000 in business losses.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lewisburg Cinema 8 on Apr 21, 2016 at 5:43 pm

The Lewisburg Cinema 8 was designed by the Louisville architectural firm Keyes Architects & Associates. There are four photos of the project on this page of the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Pierce Point Cinema 10 on Apr 21, 2016 at 5:40 pm

The Pierce Point Cinema 10 was designed by Louisville architectural firm Keyes Architects & Associates. There are two small photos on this page of the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Keystone Cinema 8 on Apr 21, 2016 at 5:36 pm

A photo of the Keystone Cinemas at Bardstown appear on this page of the web site of Lee Brick & Block, the company that made the concrete masonry used in the building. There are also a couple of closeup photos.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Regal Shelbyville 8 on Apr 21, 2016 at 5:12 pm

The Shelbyville 8 was designed for Great Escape Theaters by the Louisville architectural firm Keyes Architects & Associates. There are a few photos on the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Paradise Theatre on Apr 21, 2016 at 4:21 pm

The single-screen, 6,800 square foot Paradise Theatre in Mora, Minnesota, is among the projects listed in the theater section of the portfolio of the St.Paul architectural firm Vanney Associates. No other details are given about the project. Robert F. Vanney is the lead architect of the firm.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cambridge Cinema 5 on Apr 21, 2016 at 4:14 pm

Originally a two-screen house, at some point the Cambridge Cinema got a three screen addition. The addition was designed by the St.Paul architectural firm Vanney Associates, headed by Robert F. Vanney.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Northwoods Cinema 10 on Apr 21, 2016 at 4:01 pm

A ten-screen multiplex at Owatonna is among the projects listed in the theater projects section of the portfolio of the St.Paul architectural firm Vanney Associates. No details are given about the project. Robert F. Vanney is the lead architect of the firm.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lyceum Theatre on Apr 20, 2016 at 2:57 pm

The Weast Theatre was the smallest of four houses listed at Peoria in the 1908-1909 Cahn Guide. The Weast was a ground floor house with 900 seats. It had a rather small stage, only 41 feet between the side walls and 26 feet from the footlights (which were 8 feet in front of the curtain) to the back wall.

A 1922 obituary of Peter A. Weast at Find a Grave says that the Weast Theatre presented “high class vaudeville” from about 1888-1908. The page has scans of a couple of vintage ads for the house, one of which includes a sketch of the facade. Although the ad gives the address of the house as 314 Fulton it is apparently the same house, as the biography says that it was “…located where the Lyceum Theatre on Fulton is.”

If this report from the September 1, 1909, issue of Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal is correct, then the Weast Theatre ceased to be a theater for a while:

“The Thatcher-Bererstorn Co. has opened a garage in the old Weast Theatre on Fulton street, Peoria, Ill. The company handle the White steamers, Cadillac gasoline cars and Wood electrics.”
The re-conversion of the building back into a theater took place the following year, as noted in this item from the November 15, 1910, issue of The Nickelodeon:
“Peoria is to have still another new theater. The old Weast theater on Fulton street has been leased by a syndicate of Peorians headed by Sandy McGill, and will be devoted to motion pictures and vaudeville. Associated with McGill are Wiley Bracket, Chas. Nathan and Felix Greenburg, proprietor of other theaters. Greenberg is to be manager.”
The December 3, 1910, issue of The Moving Picture World said that the old Weast Theatre in Peoria had been remodeled and converted into a moving picture theatre, though it didn’t mention the new name of the house.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Evans Theater on Apr 19, 2016 at 8:34 pm

Sam Rothenstein, operator of the Rialto Theatre in Evans City, was preparing to soon open the new Evans Theatre as its replacement, according to the February 26, 1949, issue of Boxoffice. The new house was being outfitted by Atlas Theatre Supply.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ritz Theatre on Apr 19, 2016 at 8:30 pm

The February 26, 1949, issue of Boxoffice noted that the Baden Theatre was operated by Martin Rothenstein. Rothenstein’s father, Sam, was preparing to open the Evens Theatre at Evans City.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Delux Theatre on Apr 19, 2016 at 8:04 pm

The February 26, 1949, issue of Boxoffice reported that F. R. Spangler, operator of the Capitol Theatre at Utica, had recently opened the new Delux Theatre. Spangler intended to continue operating the Capitol as well.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Linda Theatre on Apr 19, 2016 at 7:43 pm

A few years ago Ron Newman asked who this theater was named for. According to this web pageit was named for Linda Alessio, daughter of the owner/builder of the house, Ernest Alessio.

Additional information about the Linda Theatre appears in the February 29, 1949, issue of Boxoffice.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:57 am

The Starland Theatre was listed in the 1913 Michigan City directory at 426 Franklin Street. It was one of six theaters in the city at that time.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lido Theatre on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:44 am

A chronology of Michigan City events says that the Lido Theatre was demolished in 1979.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Apr 18, 2016 at 3:33 am

The Starland Theatre at Michigan City was mentioned in the January 23, 1915, issue of Motography. This photo of Franklin Street, dated ca.1915, from the Michigan City Public Library’s Facebook page, shows the Starland on the right, but the caption gives the address as 428 Franklin. I’m sure it’s correct.

dlswansonjr’s previous comment says that the site of the Liberty became a parking lot for Citizens Bank (though he gives the bank’s address as 505 Franklin, while a history of the bank gives it as 502) which must be the parking lot that still exists on the northeast corner of Franklin and 5th.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Garden Theatre on Apr 18, 2016 at 12:27 am

Street view is set a bit too far south and facing the wrong side of the street. The Opera House was adjacent to the alley on the site now occupied by the two-story concrete building with the continuous band of dark windows on the second floor.