Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 201 - 225 of 8,447 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Dover Theatre on Mar 18, 2014 at 3:24 pm

Linkrot repair: The 1957 Boxoffice article about the remodeling of the Dover Theatre is now at this link (the text continues on this page, but the only photos are at the first link.)

A larger version of the “before” photo of the auditorium appears at bottom right of this page of Boxoffice of January 8, 1949.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Temple Theatre on Mar 18, 2014 at 3:09 pm

Clickable link to the Boxoffice article KenLayton cited. The article says that the architect for the remodeling was Paul Carlsen. Though it calls him a “nationally known theatre architect” I can find nothing else about him on the Internet.

The page also needs a credit for the original architect, A. J. Russell. Ambrose J. Russell had an interesting life and career. Born to missionary parents in India, he studied architecture at the University of Glasgow and at the Ecole de Beaux Arts in Paris. On emigrating to America, he worked in the office of H. H. Richardson, then in Worcester, Massachusetts, Kansas City, and St. Louis. He practiced in partnership with his former schoolmate Bernard Maybeck for a while before settling in Tacoma in 1892. Alone or in various partnerships he designed a number of notable buildings in the northwest, including the Governor’s mansion in Olympia, Washington.

Here is a 1947 view of the Auditorium before its modernization.

This 1964 view shows the later, simplified design.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Campus Drive-In on Mar 18, 2014 at 1:54 pm

The Campus Drive-In rated this page in Boxoffice of February 3, 1949. There are four photos. The Campus was designed by San Diego architect George Lykos.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rubidoux Drive-In on Mar 18, 2014 at 1:46 pm

The Rubidoux Drive-In was the subject of a two-page article in Boxoffice of February 5, 1949. There are five photos and a floor plan of the concession-rest room building.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Stamm Theatre on Mar 18, 2014 at 1:34 pm

Linkrot repair: The 1949 Gullistan Carpet ad with the photo of the Stamm Theatre’s lobby is now at this link.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Star Theater on Mar 18, 2014 at 10:07 am

According to the section on Bly in a rider’s handbook published by Cycle Oregon, Bly’s movie house “…was built in 1948 as the Arch Theater but is now called the Star.” It also says that “…a couple part-time residents, Paul and Ruby Dorris, have converted the building to a combination meeting space/antique gallery . The stage and screen are still up, the floor still slopes like a theater, and the venue has hosted potlucks, old-time fiddlers and more.” The Handbook was published in 2012 (PDF here) and is the most recent information about the Star Theatre that I can find on the web. I can’t find a web site for the Dorrises' operation itself, so I assume they don’t have one.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Mar 17, 2014 at 10:43 pm

Michael J. DeAngelis planned a complete remodeling of the Strand Theatre in Endicott in 1945. In the absence of any photos of the theater I can’t say the project was carried out as planned, but there is a drawing at lower left on this page of Boxoffice, December 8, 1945. Maybe somebody who saw the theater will recognize it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Colony Theatre on Mar 17, 2014 at 10:23 pm

Here is the page with Robert Boller’s drawing of the Colonial Theatre in Boxoffice of December 8, 1945. Despite the long delay in construction, the drawing looks very much the same as later photographs of the theater as actually built.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Broadway Theatre on Mar 17, 2014 at 5:59 pm

The original Broadway Theatre on this same site opened in 1916 as the Strand Theatre, and was renamed the Broadway Theatre in 1924. An announcement that the Strand Theatre was soon to open appeared in the October 7, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World. Owner H.T. Drake already operated a smaller movie house called the Lyric Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about U Ark Theater on Mar 17, 2014 at 5:31 pm

This article posted on the Fayetteville Flyer web site on May 17, 2011, refers to the U Ark Theatre’s marquee as “…a 71-year old Dickson Street landmark….” If the theater was the same age, it would have opened around 1940.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Arlington Theatre on Mar 17, 2014 at 7:34 am

johninman: Cinema Treasures page for the Santa Maria Theatre is at this link. We don’t yet have a listing for the Studio Theatre in Santa Maria.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ora Theater on Mar 14, 2014 at 4:22 pm

I’m pretty sure the Palace Theatre became the Freeport Theatre. The Palace is first listed in the Film Daily Yearbook in 1930, without a seating capacity listed. From 1931 through 1936 it is listed with 500 seats. In 1937 the Palace vanishes, but the Freeport is listed with 500 seats. It sounds like a name change.

The Princess/Port connection is tenuous. The Princess is listed until 1929 with 325 seats. It is not listed in 1930, but reappears in 1931, now with 478 seats and an asterisk, which FDY used to denote houses that didn’t have sound yet. It is then listed in 1932, 1933, and 1934 as closed. It then vanishes. The Port Theatre first appears in the 1941 FDY, with no seating capacity listed. In 1942 the Port is listed with 400 seats. There’s a definite possibility that the Port was the Princess reopened and renamed, but it’s not certain.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hi-Art Theater on Mar 14, 2014 at 8:27 am

I just stumbled across some of that information myself, and posted in on the Ora Theatre page.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Ora Theater on Mar 14, 2014 at 8:09 am

The Ora Theatre was certainly not the first movie house in Freeport. The July 15, 1916, issue of The Moving Picture World had this item:

“Freeport, Tex.—A new theater has been opened at Freeport. Texas, known as the Princess, and is under the management of H. A. Owens.”
An item in the December 4, 1941, issue of The Freeport Facts said that the new Long circuit theater soon to be built on Second Street would be Freeport’s fourth movie house. I believe that this was probably the Showboat Theatre, which was on Second Street and opened in the early 1940s. At that time, Long operated Freeport’s three other movie theaters as well.

The article also mentioned the Ora Theatre, so this house was definitely in operation by late 1941. Long also had plans to build a new theater in Velasco, a nearby town that merged with Freeport in 1957. I don’t know if Long’s plans for the Velasco house were carried out, as a site for that theater had not yet been acquired, and after the United States entered WWII a few weeks after the article ran, building restrictions were soon imposed throughout the country. Many theater projects had to be put on hold until after the war.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hi-Art Theater on Mar 14, 2014 at 7:34 am

marmer: I can’t remember which page the list of Shult’s theaters was on. I tried checking the index of the 1950-51 catalog, but Shult is not mentioned in it. I started going through the book, but my browser keeps crashing (I don’t think it likes the site’s format) so I haven’t gotten very far. I’ll keep looking, and if I find the list I’ll post here again with a link. It might take quite a while, though. The site is slow, and my computer is uncooperative.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about El Rancho Theatre on Mar 13, 2014 at 3:22 pm

A typesetter at Boxoffice must have been drinking heavily. The 1949 issue I cited previously butchered the name of the architect. “Howell Ewald” was actually Howard George Elwell, according to the 1950-51 edition of Jay Emanuel’s Theatre Catalog.

Maybe this link will work.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Hi-Art Theater on Mar 12, 2014 at 8:24 pm

An article published in the Medina Daily Journal in 1922 said that the Hi-Art Theatre in Lockport was located on West Avenue near the Big Bridge (now called Locks Plaza.) Another page of the newspaper has an ad for a real estate company at 13 West Avenue with the notation “Over the Hi-Art Theatre.” This block of West Avenue was later renamed West Main Street, which is confirmed by an ad for a fishing tackle shop in a 1938 issue of the newspaper, which gives its location as “16 W. Main—Opposite Hi-Art.”

A building with a tattoo parlor in it is at the current address 19 West Main, and east of that is a double-width building with a tan brick front, which is probably at 15-17 West Main. That means that the Hi-Art, on the ground floor below 13 West Main, was probably at the modern address 11 West Main, the lot just east of the tan brick building. Here is a Google Street View.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Rave Florence 14 on Mar 12, 2014 at 4:34 pm

The Showcase Cinemas De Lux Florence was designed by the Philadelphia architectural firm SPG3.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Nitehawk Cinema on Mar 12, 2014 at 4:15 pm

Description, photos, floor plans, and a section of the Nitehawk Cinema and other parts of the building it is in can be seen at this page of the web site archdaily. The project was designed by Caliper Studio.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Etoile Lilas on Mar 12, 2014 at 3:57 pm

A detailed description, photographs, floor plans, sections, and elevations of the Etoile Lilas Cinemas can be found on this page of the web site archdaily.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Showcase Cinema de Lux Legacy Place on Mar 12, 2014 at 3:08 pm

As noted in Dan’s description, the Showcase Cinema de lux Legacy Place was designed by the Philadelphia architectural firm SPG3, which has been designing National Amusements' theaters since the beginning of the century.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about University City 6 Theatre on Mar 12, 2014 at 2:20 pm

The Bridge Cinema De Lux was one of many projects designed for National Amusements by the Philadelphia architectural firm SPG3. There are two photos on the firm’s web site.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about IMAX Theatre at Tropicana on Mar 12, 2014 at 2:17 pm

There are two photos of the IMAX at the Tropicana on the web site of SPG3, the architectural firm that designed the project.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about AMC Northbrook Court 14 on Mar 12, 2014 at 2:12 pm

The Northbrook court 14 was one of many projects designed for General Cinema by Cambridge architectural firm Robert Luchetti Associates.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Muvico Parisian 20 & IMAX on Mar 12, 2014 at 1:37 pm

Development Design Group designed the interiors of the Muvico Parisien 20, but the building itself was designed by the Philadelphia architectural firm SPG3. There are two photos at SPG3’s web site.

The link to pictures of the theater on DDG’s web site posted by CSWalczak is dead, but this page of their site now has a slide show with four photos.