Comments from Joe Vogel

Showing 201 - 225 of 9,143 comments

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about State Theatre on Aug 14, 2014 at 11:04 pm

The Livermore Theatre was remodeled in 1931. This item is from the September 19 issue of Building and Engineering News (and it appears that Livermore’s lots have been renumbered since then):

“REMODEL, THEATRE Cost, $20,000

“LIVERMORE, Alameda Co., Cal. 1075 W First Street. Alterations and additions to theatre (new steel roof trusses, roofing, interior decorating & plaster work). Owner — Livermore Theatre (Louis Schenoni, premises. Architect — Miller & Warnecke, Financial Center Bldg., Oakland. Contractor— S. Bothwell, 748 Palm Avenue, Livermore.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Liberty Theater on Aug 14, 2014 at 6:16 pm

The Liberty Theatre in Dayton was remodeled in 1938 with plans by architect Bjarne H. Moe.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lorin Theatre on Aug 14, 2014 at 12:07 pm

The Lorin Theatre was remodeled again in 1931. This item is from the August 29 issue of Building and Engineering News:

“BERKELEY. Alameda Co., Cal. 3332 Adeline Street. Remodeling reinforced concrete theatre. Owner— Kaliski-Harband Theatre Co., 3332 Adeline St., Berkeley. Architect — A. A. Cantin, 544 Market St., San Francisco. Work involves new concrete stairway, pine flooring, re-arranging stage, ornamental plaster, revising electrical work, revising heating plant, general interior decoration. General Contract — Alfred Hopper, 1769 Pleasant Valley Ave., Oakland, $11,462. Electrical Work — Matson & Seabrook, 4115 Broadway, Oakland, $2500. Heating— Chas. R. Watts, 1166 Spruce St., Berkeley.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Jewell Theatre on Aug 13, 2014 at 12:34 pm

The Jefferson Theatre was built for Harry Sanford Jewell, publisher of the The Springfield Leader, and opened on September 28, 1911. In its early years it was strictly a vaudeville house, but by the late 1910s it was struggling and remained dark for about two years except for a few road shows. In 1921, the January 28 issue of the Springfield Republican reported that the Jefferson Theatre had reopened the previous night as a movie house.

In 1930, the house was extensively remodeled for the Fox circuit and reopened on September 14 as the Fox Plaza Theatre, according to the September 15 edition of the Leader. The remodeling was overseen by architect Lee DeCamp. In 1936 it was renamed the Jewell Theatre and operated as a movie house until becoming the home of Ozark Jubilee, a live music show broadcast first on radio and, from 1955, on ABC television.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Happy Hour Theatre on Aug 13, 2014 at 9:58 am

A history of Springfield published in 1915 had a brief biography of Robert Franklin Barrett. He entered the theater business at Hugo, Oklahoma, in 1907, and three years later moved to Springfield where he opened the Happy Hour Theatre. The Happy Hour was a storefront operation and ran Universal pictures, presenting four reels with daily changes.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about El Centro Theatre on Aug 13, 2014 at 8:52 am

Mason: Cinema Treasures is not affiliated with the El Centro Theatre. It is a web site for documenting existing and former movie theaters. I see that the Official Web Site link on our page now fetches a site with Chinese characters. As I don’t read Chinese I don’t know if the page has anything to do with the theater or not, but Yelpis listing the El Centro Theatre as closed. The Internet provides no indications of any activity at this theater for the last two years, so unless it is presenting Chinese language productions the El Centro must have closed.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Gem Theatre on Aug 12, 2014 at 12:37 pm

By 1921, the Gem was being operated by J. R. Pratt, owner of Pratt’s Theatre. Pratt’s Theatre was primarily a live house but sometimes showed movies. The August 7, 1920, issue of Exhibitors Herald mentioned both houses in one item:

“The Pratt and Gem theatres at Fulton. Mo., are both strong on the star productions. Both change programs daily. Story is preferred.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Lorain-Fulton Theatre on Aug 12, 2014 at 12:35 pm

This weblog post has a scan of an ad indicating that the Lorain-Fulton Theatre opened on Christmas Day, 1921.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Halls Theatre on Aug 12, 2014 at 11:26 am

In 1923 and 1924, G. L. Blasingame of the Halls Theatre, Halls, Tennessee, sent many capsule movie reviews to the trade journal Exhibitors Herald. This might or might not have been the same theater that operated under the name later. The only other reference I’ve found to Halls in the trade publications is from The Reel Journal of November 13, 1926, which said: “The name of the Amusu Theatre in Halls, Tenn., has been changed to Palace Theatre.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 10, 2014 at 12:56 pm

The opening of the Strand Theatre was noted in the October 2, 1915, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“The opening of the new Strand theater in Birmingham, Ala., occurred Thursday. This house is to run all feature photoplays. The first star seen was Mary Pickford in ‘Esmeralda.’ The theater is doing a splendid business.”
October 2 was a Saturday, so (assuming that the magazine’s news was timely) the Strand opened on September 30.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Capitol Theatre on Aug 10, 2014 at 12:45 pm

The latest mention of the Alcazar I’ve found in the trades is from Exhibitors Herald of March 3, 1923, and the earliest mention I’ve found of the Capitol is a Birmingham Newsitem of June 23, 1926. Birmingham Rewound doesn’t give a date for the Alcazar’s name change to Capitol, but it’s quite likely that it took place in the 1920s, before the Reproduco was installed.

I take it that the Kilgen organ installed in 1919 would have been larger and more valuable than the Reproduco. Perhaps the Kilgen was moved to a new, larger theater and it was replaced by the smaller Reproduco at the 360-seat Capitol?

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cinema North 1-5 on Aug 9, 2014 at 11:27 pm

I remember now that the other theater of this design was the Mark Twain Theatre in Sunset Hills, Missouri. Boxoffice attributes that design to Harold W. Levitt, Ernest W. LeDuc, and William H. Farwell, all of Los Angeles. LeDuc and Farwell were members of the firm of Harold W. Levitt & Associates.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mark Twain Theatre on Aug 9, 2014 at 11:27 pm

Architects Ernest W. LeDuc and William H. Farwell were members of the firm of Harold W. Levitt & Associates.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Cinema North 1-5 on Aug 9, 2014 at 10:22 pm

rivest266 is right. The Cinema North bears a striking resemblance to the Valley Circle Theatre in San Diego, California. It looks as though National General used the same plans, by Beverly Hills architect Harold Levitt, for both theaters. I recall seeing a photo of another almost identical theater (somewhere in Missouri, I think) but I can’t recall the name of it.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Classic Theater on Aug 9, 2014 at 2:34 pm

A few drawings and plans for a theater at Dayton, Ohio, designed in 1926 for Carl P. Anderson are in the Pretzinger Architectural Collection at Wright State University. It must have been the Classic Theatre. The papers in this collection are mostly from the offices of the various firms Dayton architect Albert Pretzinger was involved with. In 1926, when the Classic Theatre was designed, he was a partner in the firm of Pretzinger & Musselman.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Mayflower Arts Center on Aug 9, 2014 at 1:49 pm

Apparently the Mayflower Theatre’s organ was still in use at least as late as 1940, when the October 26 issue of The Piqua Daily Call made reference to “…Donald Wells, organist at the Mayflower theater….” Wells was visiting Delaware to attend a concert by French organist and composer Joseph Bonnet.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 9, 2014 at 12:24 pm

The opening of the Strand was noted in the November 6, 1915, issue of The Moving Picture World:

“Fred L. Adams has opened the Strand theater at Piqua, Ohio. This is a handsome new fireproof structure seating 500, and is equipped with all conveniences for the patrons. Mr. Adams was formerly the manager and proprietor of the Favorite theater in Piqua.”

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Miami Theatre on Aug 9, 2014 at 12:20 pm

The Piqua Daily Call was advertising this house as Schine’s Miami Theatre in 1933. In 1930 it was advertising as May’s Piqua Theatre.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theatre on Aug 8, 2014 at 2:55 pm

The Strand in Rockland was in operation by 1920. The report of the Massachusetts District Police published January, 1920, listed the Strand Theatre, Rockland, in good condition. The licensee was named Lee A. Rhodenzier. The January 23, 1923, issue of The Film Daily had this item:

“The Manchester Amusement Co., a subsidiary [of New England Theaters] has sold the Strand, Rockland, Mass., to L. A. Rhodenizer, the theater’s former manager.”
Contracts had been let for construction of a small movie theater in Rockland in 1915, according to the May 29 issue of The American Contractor. The two-story building was only 34x56 feet, though, which would have been too small for the Strand’s 779 seats, but it might have been expanded later, so it could have been the Strand.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Wayne Cinemas on Aug 8, 2014 at 2:53 pm

If it burned in 1926, it’s possible that the Trainor Opera House had become the Strand Theatre which, according to the November 27, 1926, issue of The Piqua Daily Call had been completely destroyed by a fire the previous night, along with an adjacent building. The fire was caused by the explosion of film in the projector. The Opera House was built by the I.O.O.F. in 1873.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:10 pm

The Strand was on the northeast corner of Main and High Streets, according to the May 26, 1976, issue of The Piqua Daily Call

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:04 pm

The March 11, 1976, issue of The Piqua Daily Call said that demolition of the old Strand Theatre building was underway.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Strand Theater on Aug 8, 2014 at 12:17 pm

A July 22, 1935, article in The Piqua Daily Call says that the long-abandoned Strand Theatre building was to be remodeled into a bottling plant. The article places the three-story building on the east side of the public square with a frontage of 91 feet on North Main Street and a somewhat longer frontage on East High Street. I’ve been unable to determine if the building was on the northeast corner or the southeast corner. Both corners now feature parking lots, so the Strand has been demolished.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Piqua Cinema on Aug 8, 2014 at 11:53 am

This house opened on September 23, 1929, as the Ohio Theatre. An article in the August 29, 1970, issue of The Piqua Daily Call features an article about John Hixson, who says that he was one of the projectionists when the house opened.

The May 22, 1931, issue of the Call says that Schine’s Piqua Theatre, formerly the Ohio Theatre, would have its formal opening that night.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel commented about Columbia Music Arena on Aug 8, 2014 at 1:36 am

An item in the July 16, 1910, issue of The American Contractor attributes the design of this theater to the firm of Taylor & DeCamp. The partnership of Charles C. Taylor and Benjamin C. DeCamp was formed in 1909 and dissolved in 1912.