Ambassador Theatre

3065 Madison Road,
Cincinnati, OH 45209

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The Park Hall Theatre was opened in 1913. It was still the Park Hall Theatre in 1936, but was later re-named Ambassador Theatre. It was closed by 1986.

Contributed by Joe Allen

Recent comments (view all 17 comments)

blgwc
blgwc on March 14, 2009 at 1:32 pm

Was there a balcony at the Ambassador? It was a block away from the 20th Century and by the early 70s it was my impression the “classier” films played there, the 20th Century got more of the “young crowd” films.

What a great stretch on Madison Road in Oakley: The 20th Century, the Ambassador, and the Oakley Drive-In!

kencmcintyre
kencmcintyre on July 27, 2009 at 10:03 pm

This is from Boxoffice in October 1945:

CINCINNATI-Sale of the Oakley Theater building on Madison Road and plans for extensive modernization of the building were announced last Saturday. The building contains three stores, a theater and a lodge hall.

Following the sale, the owners leased the property to the Amnassador Theatre Co. for a 20-year period. It is planned to spend more than $75,000 modernizing the building, which fronts 70 feet on Madison Road and extends back 289 feet to Markbreit Avenue.

The entire front will be given a new facade and the theater lobby will be enlarged to include what is now a store space. the auditorium will be enlarged to accommodate approximately 850 patrons. Parking facilities will also be provided.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on January 2, 2010 at 7:49 pm

August 9 1974 THE STING opens,at the Ambassador. It was under the banner NEIGHBORHOOD THEATRES. They ran 11 screens in Cincinnati. IT was 2.50 a seat to see the STING.

Nobody
Nobody on February 8, 2010 at 12:18 am

Does anyone know if the Ambassador featured some “double” seats?

(They’ve been described as small loveseats.)

moviemad
moviemad on March 15, 2011 at 5:10 pm

I worked the AMBASSADOR THEATRE during the strike of 1974 when Levin Services operated the theatre along with the 20TH CENTURY, ESQUIRE and HYDE PARK. They also ran two drive ins. The JOLLY ROGER was later added to the strike. There was no balcony. It was vandalized during the strike as seats were slashed, screen slashed, speaker wires slashed (this theatre was a magnetic stereo sound), the 4 projectors were destroyed by taking a crow bar to the intermittents, the carbon arc generator had its wires cut. The print of THE STING was ruined by pouring film cement on the side of each reel. Reel 7 was saved by still being in the bottom magazine. It took us 2 weeks to reopen.
Levin’s did close the theatre as well as the other ones. AMBASSADOR became an ACE hardware for some time.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on April 3, 2011 at 10:23 pm

Ashamed of my Union for doing this,I assume it was Iatse since not a lot is given about the Strike.I don’t see that happening where I live in Georgia.

moviemad
moviemad on May 8, 2011 at 2:28 pm

Mike, it was rumored that the Chicago union (which was very strong) was responsible for the break in. Levins had a a story that the drive in they ran there near Chicago contract was up for renewal and they walked in, told to sign the contract on the table without discussion or negotiations.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on December 10, 2013 at 3:32 pm

hanksykes said earlier that the Park Hall Theatre was built in 1913 by builders Moorman & John. The January 4, 1913, issue of The Moving Picture World ran an item saying that builders Moorman and John, of Oakley, Ohio, had commissioned architect Edward Sloctemyer to design a theater for them, which was to be built on Madison Road near Gilmore Avenue. No theater name was given, but it must have been the Park Hall/Ambassador.

MovieMad52
MovieMad52 on March 31, 2014 at 10:44 pm

Mike, I bet we could spend hours talking about the good old days.

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