Villa Theater

2515 NW 23rd Street,
Oklahoma City, OK 73107

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Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 28, 2012 at 4:24 pm

The new Villa described in this later trade article. Plan to change name to Apollo was apparently scrapped: Boxoffe

Tinseltoes
Tinseltoes on July 28, 2012 at 3:23 pm

Plans to convert Villa into Apollo twin described in this 1969 trade article: Boxoffice

raybradley
raybradley on June 27, 2010 at 10:03 pm

Comments posted 10-4-05, surely must describe the result of the mid 1940’s remodel job. Originally the Villa interior was pure Art Deco, aillustrated in photos of sister house- Tower Theatre, Drumwright, OK.

NeonSky
NeonSky on July 12, 2009 at 5:49 pm

I saw THE GUMBALL RALLY here in ‘76, and a second-run screening of WILLY WONKA & CHOC FACTORY. I seem to remember sitting in the balcony. Anyone else remember a balcony?

raybradley
raybradley on September 7, 2007 at 5:38 pm

You’re right, Melba, and Tower Theatre shots mentioned on Seymour’s post are those of the Drumright Tower.

missmelbatoast
missmelbatoast on September 7, 2007 at 4:44 pm

Seymour, the Tower Theater that was sister to the Villa was located in Drumright, not Duncan.

seymourcox
seymourcox on September 7, 2007 at 4:37 pm

If you would like to see the original look of the Villa Theatre, then see 1937 photos of the Tower Theater, Duncan, OK. These were sister houses, and the only differance between the two was that the Villa had a balcony and the Tower didn’t. To view images type in word “tower”.
View link

Okie
Okie on March 26, 2006 at 2:33 pm

Look into oklahoman archive web site for pictures of the Villa Theatre.
Noftsger’s architectural drawing can be found on July 10, 1938, and an exterior photograph in the September 24, 1939 issue.

xxx
xxx on October 4, 2005 at 3:02 pm

B. Gaylord Noftsger was a talented architect who knew how to produce impressive results on a limited budget. For OKC’s VILLA Theater the architect skilfully diguised an “economy” auditorium with decorative drapery interlaced with strands of shimmering beads, and careful placement of a few colorful, lighted niches here and there, while keeping the remainder of the space in dramatic shadow. Noftsger cleverly enhanced a drab ceiling by installing soft lighting effects behind three massive “bullseye” HVAC grills. All this put together created a striking illusion that the entire auditorium was ornately decorated, when in acutality it was not.
The VILLA was very popular with teenagers because it was located midway between two large high schools, and near a junior high. The balcony was a favorite “make out” spot for teens who did'nt have cars.

xxx
xxx on September 9, 2005 at 9:21 pm

Architect for the VILLA Theater was officially B. GAYLORD NOFTSGER, as reported in several 1937/38 news articles concerning the Villa Building in the Daily Oklahoman Newspaper. My notes have been recovered.

xxx
xxx on September 7, 2005 at 11:23 pm

Sincerely I apologize for any incorrect information provided by my-self; Indepth research has revealed that VILLA Theater architects were NOT Jay McKay nor Pat McGee. Jay McKay was interior decorator for the Plaza Theater. Pat McGee was a Paramount Theatres General Manager, also involved with the Plaza. But neither man helped design the Villa.
Please remove my Aug 7, 2005. comments.

xxx
xxx on August 7, 2005 at 10:35 am

Built on the cheap (reports range from $20,000 to $75,000), designers John McKay and Pat McGee were clever in using bright color and created dramatic lighting effects on yards and yards of flowing stage draperies.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on July 6, 2005 at 7:55 pm

The Villa Theater opened in 1938 and closed in 1978. It was demolished in 1983.