Max Linder Panorama

24 Boulevard Poissonniere,
Paris 75009

Unfavorite 4 people favorited this theater

From balcony (not mezannine)

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Opened as the 1,200 seat Kosmorama in 1914. Taken over by Max Linder, it was re-named Cine Max Linder in 1914.

Re-designed in an Art Deco style in the 1930’s, it was renovated again in 1957 and 1987. In 1998, it was taken over by the Belgium based Kinepolis Group, and they sold it in 2003.

Seating is provided for 300 in the stalls, 250 in the mezzanine and 150 in the balcony, by 2012 total capacity is 615.

Contributed by Christian Quest

Recent comments (view all 6 comments)

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on May 10, 2006 at 12:23 am

Originally opened in May 1912 as the Kosmorama, it had a seating capacity of 1,200. In December 1914 it became the Cine-Max Linder. It was modernised into an Art Deco style in the 1930’s.

Totally modernised again in 1987 it now has seating for 700 (300 Stalls, 250 Mezzanine and 150 Balcony). The auditorium interior is totally black so that all focus is on the screen. The cinema is THX certified and can screen 70mm film.

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on September 10, 2007 at 2:47 am

A 1995 photograph of the Max Linder Panorama:
View link

TruusBobJanToo
TruusBobJanToo on May 31, 2009 at 10:47 am

The Max Linder has a Panorama (Cinerama) screen of 18 meters, THX, sound and 700 seats on three levels. In 1914 silent film comedian Max Linder decided to realize one of his old dreams: to start a cinema. He bought a cinema with 1,200 sears, created in 1912, the Kosmorama. The Ciné Max Linder opened in December 1914. Linder closed his cinema in 1923 but it was reopened by Pathé in 1932. In 1957 the interior was modernized. The last changes took place in January 1987.

Here’s a night photo from May 2009, and a postcard and a bio of founder Max Linder.

MonaP
MonaP on April 7, 2012 at 3:53 pm

The Kosmorama in Paris was established by the Norwegian Halfdan Nobel Roede (1877- 1963) who entered the cinema-business in 1911 in Oslo. He probably sold out in 1914 due to the building of Paladsteateret, a prestige cinema theater in Oslo. Until the municipal of Oslo took over all private cinemas in 1926, he was the largest cinema owner in Oslo. He was involved in other cultural activities, as a composer, theater manager and art collector. Nobel Roede decorated his cinemas with paintings of Edward Munch and others.

You must login before making a comment.

New Comment

Subscribe Want to be emailed when a new comment is posted about this theater?
Just login to your account and subscribe to this theater