Grandin Theatre

1310 Grandin Road,
Roanoke, VA 24015

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Grandin Theatre

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The Grandin Theatre was opened March 26, 1932. It is the only remaining classic movie house in the city, closed in November 2001 due to financial pressures amid increased competition from local multiplexes. The final, sold out screening of “The Last Picture Show” was a fitting end for the Grandin Theatre.

While owner Julie Hunsaker was forced to close the theatre, the Grandin Theatre Foundation restored and reopened the theatre after a $1.25 million effort.

Today, the Grandin Theatre is back and better than ever.

Contributed by Cinema Treasures

Recent comments (view all 18 comments)

ghamilton on May 27, 2005 at 7:49 pm

My favorite movie memory from the Grandin was Dr.Strangelove.A lot of the senior class of Cave Spring,‘64 saw it there and did skits from our favorite parts during school time.Giving the nazi salute to Quillan or Overstreet when their backs were turned often happened.I do remember some ads styling the Grandin as Roanoke’s last movie palace.That reminded me of a line from 1776,but forget that..It’s like calling a ford pinto a BMW.Both beat walking,but there is a difference.The Byrd is a movie palace.The Grandin as a nice neighborhood movie house that through great love and pain has survived,when every other one in the beautiful valley has bit the dust.Kudos for that.

teecee on June 8, 2005 at 5:19 am

Must have been used for concerts during the 1980s.
I have a list showing Bobby “Blue” Bland played there on 3/15/85.

snowplowman on September 15, 2005 at 8:53 pm

The terrace theatre was a twin & I was the projectionest there part time. Also I worked at it sister theatre the Towers theatre which was a triple ples & it was only about 3 to 4 miles from the grandin. I also was the projectionest there part time.

RayBentley on February 13, 2006 at 5:43 pm

When I was a teenager attending Patrick Henry High School, I met Sam Craver who was general manager of the Grandin/Jefferson/Lee Theatres. He gave me a stack of pressbooks and spent hours showing me how movies were promoted and advertised. A year later we moved to Richmond where I got a job as an usher at a reserved seat 70mm house and eventually became the advertising director for the circuit of 100 screens from 1974 to 1996, all from the seed Mr. Craver planted. Nice folks in Roanoke!

Patsy on February 14, 2006 at 3:40 am

I would like to visit Roanoke as I’ve been to that city many years ago and remember the star on the hill overlooking the city and the beautiful neighborhoods. A future visit would include the Grandin this time around though!

ghamilton on February 14, 2006 at 3:58 am

Roanoke,Patsy,is probably the most livable,pleasent place in the country,with more beauty than is given to most places.The biggest stain is the total wipe out of the former array of great downtown theaters.Several are not listed on the site,including the largest and grandest.One attraction for a traveler like me,is the traditionally lower than anywhere in the region,gas prices.

Patsy on December 7, 2006 at 4:45 pm

Thanks for the photo of this theater as I’ve been to Roanoke many years and don’t recall seeing it, but then again I wasn’t into theatres during my visit in the 60’s. It looks like the original ticket kios is still there, too.

ghamilton on August 7, 2007 at 7:06 pm

HEY! Wasn’t the exterior of the Grandin used in the movie “Crazy People”??

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on December 20, 2017 at 3:20 pm

The Emporis page for the Grandin Theatre attributes the design of the project to the local architectural and construction firm Eubank & Caldwell.

According to the City of Roanoke’s official plan for the Greater Raleigh Court neighborhood, the Grandin opened as the Community Theatre on March 26, 1932.

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