Palace Theatre

235 College Avenue,
Athens, GA 30601

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Palace Theatre

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The Palace Theatre opened in February 1, 1921. It was equipped with a Moller 2 manual 10 rank organ. The Palace Theatre is still listed in the 1980’s. A parking garage is located where the Palace Theatre once stood.

Contributed by Lost Memory

Recent comments (view all 17 comments)

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on October 24, 2009 at 5:07 pm

These letters were found by me in the old MILLER theatre in Augusta. I have too many to print and most are hard to read. But Ernest and T.O. had some good old letters.

TLSLOEWS
TLSLOEWS on December 28, 2009 at 1:48 pm

Too bad there are no pictures of this “PALACE”.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on October 27, 2010 at 6:05 pm

Yeah,I should have taken a few since no one in Athens ever gets on CT.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on April 25, 2011 at 8:52 pm

Summer Prices for the PALACE 1 and 2 Theatres will be “BLUE THUNDER” at $4,00 a seat and Child $2.00 a seat, “SUPERMAN” has Adults paying $4.00 a seat, but the kids tickets go up to $2,50 a seat.This from the 1983 Knoxville Home Office admission Prices Memo.Still under the Plitt banner.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on December 20, 2011 at 7:06 pm

Any old employees can check out REMEMBERING PLITT THEATRES on Facebook,Great place to see for old theatre folks in the real days of the Theatre Business.

Joe Vogel
Joe Vogel on February 13, 2012 at 8:45 am

The Film Daily of February 9, 1921, said that the Palace Theatre in Athens had opened on February 1. The Palace was a Loew’s house.

SidKCols
SidKCols on May 6, 2015 at 10:40 am

It was still going strong with first run pics in the late 60’s. My wife and I attended this theater often.

Mike Rogers
Mike Rogers on November 9, 2017 at 2:52 pm

WELL into the 80’s, NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN opened there sidkcols…

Will Dunklin
Will Dunklin on November 14, 2017 at 10:38 pm

At the 1921 opening there was a II/10 Moller pipe organ to accompany the silent pictures. While Loews was spending a lot of money on new buildings just after World War I, they skimped on their organs, buying Mollers instead of the more expensive makes. In larger markets many of Loew’s Mollers were replaced after just a few years. Here in Athens it seems the Moller survived to the sound era, at which point Loews fired all their organists and left to the organs to the mice. There is no record of what became of this one but it would not be unusual if it went to the landfill.

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