Grand Theatre

447 Locust Street,
Chillicothe, MO 64601

Unfavorite No one has favorited this theater yet

Grand Theatre

Viewing: Photo | Street View

The Dickenson Theatre Theatre opened in 1932. Seating was listed at 514. It was renamed Grand Theatre in 1940. The theatre had a couple different operators, Griffith Theatres and Theatre Enterprises.

The Grand Theatre closed in 1954 and was later repurposed for a Moore Equipment Co. Any further information on the Grand Theatre would be appreciated.

Contributed by Chuck

Recent comments (view all 3 comments)

frankgriggs
frankgriggs on March 11, 2012 at 1:06 pm

Back in the late 1940’s my mother would give me a quarter to go to the Saturday afternoon matinee at the Grand Theater in Chillicothe, Missouri. It cost me fourteen cent to get into the theater which included two Grade B movies (one western and the other a mystery) plus a serial (for some reason I only remember the Superman ones) and a cartoon. The other eleven cents went for a box of popcorn (ten cents) and a penny for the candy machine. It was always a great afternoon. About the only thing I remember about the building itself was the fact that it had a log cabin facade. Frank Griggs

Chris1982
Chris1982 on August 8, 2014 at 11:22 am

This theatre opened in 1932 as the Dickenson Theatre, Became the Grand Theatre in 1940 and closed in 1954. Should have an AKA Dickenson Theatre.

dallasmovietheaters
dallasmovietheaters on May 25, 2015 at 2:42 pm

W.P. Cuff had the Empire Theater in downtown Chillicothe and wanted to one-up the veteran house. Cuff’s Strand Theatre opened November 30, 1920 with the film, “The Bird of Paradise.” The $10,000 lighting system produced audience-pleasing effects and the theater was popular at the outset. Cuff would team up with two Kansas City investors in Johnny Kling and Haley Reed to increase their holdings. The popular Strand Theater eventually attracted a new buyer in the fast-growing Missouri/Kansas/Illinois Dickinson Theatre Circuit which bought the Empire and Strand from Kling in April of 1941. Dickinson would spend $50,000 on the Strand including a new sign and featuring its new name, the Dickinson Theatre. The theater was said to be the only one with an air conditioning system between St. Louis and Kansas City at a cost of $20,000.

You must login before making a comment.

New Comment

Subscribe Want to be emailed when a new comment is posted about this theater?
Just login to your account and subscribe to this theater