Princess Picture House

3 Northumberland Street,
Huddersfield, HD1 1DT

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terry
terry on August 11, 2017 at 8:46 am

I spent a few years in the 1970’s as A/M at the ABC Huddersfield and the Princess seemed to do very well with the second runs from both the ABC and the Classic.

I only visited the Princess once and it was on a rare Saturday night off. I went to the pay box ready to ‘cough up’ for the price of two circle tickets but the Manager/Lessee, Donald Whitehead (late of the Empire), happened to be duty cashier. Recognising me, he only charged for one, issuing a complimentary ticket for myself. He duly signed the back of it otherwise the ticket checker upstairs would have challenged its presentation on a Saturday.

The second feature, ‘Rio Lobo’ was about half way through as we sat down and when it ended the houselights came up and the festoon curtain was lowered. It was a pretty cinema and, I have to admit, retained nearly all concealed lighting and decorative fittings as opposed to the ABC where, by this time, our notorious cost-cutting Zone Manager had seen to it that very little remained illuminated apart from the main ceiling fittings and the house tabs….

Fully expecting to see the adverts and trailers when the lights dimmed and the festoons opened, I was amazed that they proceeded straight to the main feature,‘Carry On Behind', a first run (unusual for the Princess).

Some time later we acquired one of the Princess’s projectists at the ABC and I mentioned the unusual programme format. He told me that the ads, trailers etc always formed the beginning of the programme there and furthermore,that on the occasions when an epic film with an intermission was presented, the ads and trailers played after the intermission – prior to part two of the feature.

That must have been the most unusual procedure of any cinema anywhere – unless anyone knows of anything even odder still, that is……

HJHill
HJHill on September 30, 2012 at 3:35 pm

The high, coffered ceiling gave the place cavernous acoustics and the warm ambience of a mausoleum. Projection was from the rear of the stalls. In the balcony one felt cut-off from the rest of the auditorium, as little of the stalls was visible from up there. Noises of people moving about reverberated around the space under that ceiling.

At the end of the 1960s the Tudor-bethan, panelled foyer still boasted a small, pre-war, sign proudly proclaiming that the sound system was by Westrex!

curlew
curlew on January 13, 2009 at 6:40 am

Upon completion of the restoration Casino Red went into administration after spending 1000’s on the place it traded for only four weeks- be interested to see whats happening now

curlew
curlew on January 13, 2009 at 6:39 am

Upon completion of the restoration Casino Red went into administration after spending 1000’s on the place it traded for only four weeks- be interested to see whats happening now

curlew
curlew on January 13, 2009 at 6:37 am

Upon completion of the restoration Casino Red went into administration after spending 1000’s on the place it traded for only four weeks- be interested to see whats happening now

Ian
Ian on September 14, 2007 at 3:31 pm

Another (September 2007) photo here:–

View link

jasper
jasper on September 14, 2007 at 8:15 am

Take a look at the visuals at www.casinored.com In July 2007 this company were given a license to convert the building into a casino. They have said that they will restore and retain the buildings origional features. If they are as good as their word, this must be better than the building standing empty and decaying

jasper
jasper on May 11, 2007 at 7:12 am

The Rumboat Carribar is situated in the basement- which is where the restaurant and Dance Hall were situated

Ken Roe
Ken Roe on May 10, 2007 at 7:33 am

Part of the building is listed as currently being the Rumboat Carribar.

jasper
jasper on May 10, 2007 at 7:12 am

I believe this cinema opened in 1926 after conversion from a wool wharehouse. Many Huddersfield people will agree that it was indeed a very pretty cinema, the basement restaurant remained popular with the residents of the town for many years after the cinema closed.In the 1960’s and 1970,s both restaurant and cinema were a combined conern, and it was possible to have ‘high tea’ downstairs before the start of the films upstairs. The foyers were designed in 1920’s style ‘tudor /medieval’ obviously fake but well done. The auditorium was rather like the interior of a small edwardian theatre, with ‘fake’ side boxes. I dont know if it was ever used for live theatre- b ut due to its substantial stage, the building was briefly considered for such when Huddersfield was without a theatre