Loew's State Theatre

1540 Broadway,
New York, NY 10036

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Loew's State

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Loew’s State Theatre opened on August 9th 1921, with vaudeville and movies, and the adjoining office building that became Loew’s headquarters.

Many World Premieres were hosted here including “The Three Musketeers” on October 20, 1948. Loew’s State Theatre was closed in 1958 for modernisation. The theatre reopened on March 28, 1959, with the World Premiere engagement of “Some Like It Hot”. The theatre was very successful in the 1960’s with reserved-seat road shows such as “Ben Hur”.

World Premiere’s of 70mm movies at the Loew’s State Theatre included “Ben Hur”(November 18, 1959 and played for 74 weeks), “King of Kings”(October 11, 1961), “Mutiny on the Bounty”(November 8, 1962), “Becket”(March 3, 1964), “The Agony and the Ecstasy”(October 7, 1965), “The Bible in the Beginning….”(September 28, 1966) and “Paint Your Wagon”(October 16, 1969 in Loew’s State 2). In 1972, “The Godfather” had its World Premiere here.

Partly due to the loss of Loew’s Capitol Theatre, Loew’s twinned the State Theatre. The balcony overhang was extended to create State 1 (1,172 seats) in the downstairs auditorium, State 2 (1,214 seats) used the upper portion of the original proscenium arch, was designed in a more ornate fashion, and had some original side wall and ceiling decoration visible. The theatre reopened December 1968, with “Oliver” in State 1 and “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” in State 2.

The Loew’s State Theatre closed February 19,1987.

In the 1990’s the State Theatre and the adjoining office building which had been Loew’s headquarters were demolished and replaced by a Virgin Megastore. A replacement four-screen multiplex, the Loew’s State 4, opened in the basement in 1996, but closed in 2006 after the opening nearby in W. 42nd Street of two stadium seated megaplexes; the AMC Empire 25 and the 42nd Street E-Walk(13-screens opened by Loew’s in 1999 and operated by Regal since the AMC-Loew’s merger)

Contributed by William Gabel, Howard B. Haas

Recent comments (view all 465 comments)

curmudgeon
curmudgeon on June 21, 2015 at 9:35 am

hdtv267 Bit confused. Do you mean Times Square was MORE or LESS fun in the 70’s and 80’s? Must say I found it quite bland in 2007 compared to the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s images that fired my imagination to visit NY. Admittedly I didn’t experience the sleazy side, but the proliferation of Cinema and Theatre palaces, now sadly gone, made for a very sterile and disappointing area.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on June 21, 2015 at 11:07 pm

It seems hdtv267 means that Times Square was more fun in the 70s and 80s than in its current incarnation as “an appealing place to go to have fun.”

DavidZornig
DavidZornig on September 4, 2015 at 2:52 pm

Three 1960 images added courtesy of Monique Carboni. Her mother is pictured in the exterior photo.

DavidZornig
DavidZornig on October 7, 2015 at 9:29 am

More photos added.

DavidZornig
DavidZornig on November 16, 2015 at 5:55 pm

Art Carney 1954 photo added courtesy of Edward Eckert. Martin & Lewis film “3 Ring Circus” on the Loew’s marquee.

Movieholic
Movieholic on December 23, 2015 at 7:35 am

If time travel is ever invented, which is highly unlikely, LOL, this and the old Loews Orpheum, when it was a twin, are two Manhattan movie houses I’d love to visit. I know it’ll never happen but a guy can dream, can’t he?

markp
markp on December 23, 2015 at 6:17 pm

I was just talking about this place with someone today. I was in here twice in my life, both on school trips. The first time to see “Doctor Doolittle” when it was a single. Then a while later “Oliver” after it was twinned.

michaelkaplan
michaelkaplan on December 25, 2015 at 9:57 pm

Is there some reason this theater isn’t in the Search database? (I tried “Loew’s State” and nothing came up.) I saw several movies in this great theater, including Fox’s “How to Marry a Millionaire” with Marilyn Monroe. It was the second film in CinemaScope and the wide image – projected on a lightly curved screen – was incredible. The film began with a musical overture, played in multi-channel magnetic stereophonic sound. Once the action began, I remember vividly how the sound followed the actors as they moved around the screen.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) on December 26, 2015 at 5:11 am

I just did the same search and it’s there. The site gives “open” theaters first, but click the tab “all theaters” and voila!

scorpion6x
scorpion6x on February 29, 2016 at 3:24 pm

Hi my name is Hector, I’m looking for pictures of the interior of the Loews theater. I am specifically looking for paintings hanging on the walls of Marilyn Monroe, Charlie Chaplin Humphrey Bogart… If any one can lead me in the right direction please. They were originally were hanging in the theater for years. They were all painted by Patrick Casey. Any info would be greatly appreciated thanks

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