Old Movies Digitised?

posted by tommo on February 17, 2005 at 5:20 am

Hello,

Does anybody know if old movies such as “Citizen Kane” or “Metropolis” have been digitised and are able to be distributed and screened digitally?

Thankyou,

Tom.

Comments (9)

EvanC
EvanC on February 17, 2005 at 6:36 am

I assume you are asking if these movies can be run theatrically in a digital format (DVD) I would contact KINO.com, the distributor of Metropolis to see if they license that film to be run in a digital format. Obviously these titles are on DVD, and with a good, bright auditorium-designed digital projector they could be shown from DVD.

Another alternative would be to rent the film and show a digital instead….I would contact the distributor, since commercial digital theatre projection is on the horizon.

EvanC
EvanC on February 17, 2005 at 8:05 am

What I meant was with permission of the movie’s distributor you could run a digital version instead of the film. Nowadays copyrights are taken very seriously in the business.

lopez
lopez on February 17, 2005 at 9:19 am

No matter what the format, if you plan on exhibiting the film theatrically the distributor holding the licensing rights to the film will charge you for the rental…

tommo
tommo on February 17, 2005 at 11:08 am

Thank you to EvanC and nova for replying to my query. What I wanted to know was whether or not there was a distributer who had the license to all these old movies and was able to distribute them electronically, i.e. via a download system, for digital projectors to screen…
Also does anyone know how much a digitised version of a film like ‘Metroplois’ would cost to rent to screen theatrically?
Many thanks, Tom.

Manwithnoname
Manwithnoname on February 17, 2005 at 12:00 pm

“Metropolis” is in the public domain so should be no problem to screen in any format as long as it does not have, say, a copyrighted musical score without paying a fee. “Citizen Kane” is distributed by Warner Home Video in DVD so you may want to start there.

PeterApruzzese
PeterApruzzese on February 17, 2005 at 12:19 pm

I don’t know of any major distributor who offers classic titles via download for digital projectors. They offer them in 35mm prints.

As for your question about a distributor who has a “license to these old movies”, there isn’t one single distributor. Each studio maintains its own repertory or classics division and you need to contact them about any films you want to show. Don’t waste time contacting the home video divisions, they have nothing to do with theatrical showings. Your best bet is to hire a film booker to inquire for you if you have no experience in this area.

Yes, some copies of Metropolis are in public domain, but not the latest restoration that Transit Film of Munich did – USA theatrical rights are controlled by Kino and that version is copyrighted.

Pete Apruzzese
Director of Film Programming
Big Screen Classics at the Lafayette Theatre

UAGirl
UAGirl on February 17, 2005 at 8:05 pm

[i]Yes, some copies of Metropolis are in public domain, but not the latest restoration that Transit Film of Munich did – USA theatrical rights are controlled by Kino and that version is copyrighted.
[/i]

The prints that I viewed were absolutely beautiful. They really spent alot of time cleaning the film up.

Tommo

Public viewing is a such a tricky thing to get the studio to agree on. Good luck.

habu5p1
habu5p1 on January 18, 2007 at 10:56 pm

I am searching for a 1948 movie named “10th Avenue Angel”. Can not find it anywhere. I would sure love to find anyone who might have it, or might know how to aquire it.

PeterApruzzese
PeterApruzzese on January 19, 2007 at 3:05 am

10th Avenue Angel was originally released by M-G-M, so it’s a good possibility that the rights are now held by Warner Bros. (who control the majority of the M-G-M films) – whether they have 35mm prints of it or not is another story.

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