Movies

  • Today

    “Secret Cinema reveals it showed The Great Dictator at protest secret screening, following Sony’s The Interview cancellation”

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    Secret Cinema has revealed that it showed Charlie Chaplin’s The Great Dictator at a one-off secret screening on Sunday to protest against ‘the attack on freedom of expression’ represented by the Sony hacking.

    Staged on Sunday at simultaneous events in London, New York, San Francisco and Rome, the 1940 film portrays fictitious dictator Adenoid Hynkel, a thinly-veiled version of Hitler. In London the movie was shown at the Troxy Cinema, while an additional event in Los Angeles screened The Red Chapel.

    Over 2,000 people attended from across the five cities and at least £11,500 of the total proceeds will go to global free speech charity Article 19.

    Read the entire article online at independent.co.uk.

  • December 15, 2014

    “For film lovers! Ikea surprises moviegoers by replacing every seat in Russian cinema with double beds” From Russia.

    The comfort of reclining chairs, bean bags, pillows and couches that sometimes enhance the cinematic experience have been one-upped in Russia, where an entire movie theatre has been filled with beds.

    While sites such as the Electric Cinema in London’s Notting Hill have a front row devoted to beds, one screening room in the Kinostar De Lux Playhouse was gutted of all of its seats with 17 double beds brought in.

    The project has been dubbed ‘Wake Up Love’ in line with a campaign by Swedish furniture chain Ikea, which provided the beds.

    The film lovers' experience at a multiplex a shopping centre in Khimki, north of Moscow, doesn’t just include the bed on which to watch a latest release, but on entry they’re given slippers.

    Read the entire article online at dailymail.co.uk.

  • December 11, 2014

    “ The Most Romantic Kisses in Cinema” From the NYTimes.

    In this year’s Great Performers issue, A.O. Scott writes that kissing in movies ‘‘established a glamorous iconography and an elegant choreography for an experience that, in real life, is frequently sloppy, clumsy and less than perfectly graceful.’’ Here, a few of the most romantic kisses on film, from young love to foiled love.

    Check out the entire infographic at NYTimes.com.

  • December 21, 2011

    Looking for theater seats

    SEATTLE, WA — I am presently converting my garage into a family & friends, deluxe cinema and need about:

    WANTED: 20, professional, used but clean, red color cinema seats w/cup holders and 10 end caps, for a flat floor mounting.

    Will pick-up and willing to remove if required! I have advertised on Craigslist, under the Seattle-Tacoma columns, but without any luck!

    Simon Overton
    360-550-8027

  • November 28, 2011

    L.A. movie palaces get starring role

    LOS ANGELES, CA — The Los Angeles Times had a feature last week about the cinemas of downtown Los Angeles popping up frequently in recent films. Check out how many of this season’s top flicks have cameos.

  • November 22, 2011

    New Trailer for Film, “The Rep”

  • November 16, 2011

    Limited patience for limited releases

    A story in the Stony Brook Press discusses the writer’s frustration in having to go all the way into Manhattan to see a particular film in limited release. She poses the question of what would happen if certain films were released wider.

    Check it out and comment about what lengths you’ve taken to see a limited release.

  • November 7, 2011

    Boston internet theatre photo auction

    Check out the Boston Theatre Photo Lot at Heritage Auctions. The auction goes through November 13th.

  • July 15, 2011
  • June 28, 2011

    Avon Theatre Earns National Attention for “Tree of Life” Policy

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    STAMFORD, CT — The Avon Theatre has garnered national attention for announcing a “no-refunds” policy for screenings of Terence Malick’s love-it-or-hate-it new film, “The Tree of Life.” After a series of heated interactions between frustrated (and sometimes angry) patrons, Adam Birnbaum, director of film programming at the Avon, posted a sign in the theater warning viewers that this was a “uniquely visionary and deeply philosophical film” that “does not follow a traditional, linear narrative approach to storytelling.”

    “We wanted to be as informative and transparent as possible with patrons in the event that they weren’t aware that this wasn’t going to be traditional story,” Birnbaum told the Stamford Advocate. “We also wanted to protect our staff and preemptively defuse any future negative interactions that patrons and staff members might have.”