Comments from Mike (saps)

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Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about AMC Empire 25 on Oct 7, 2016 at 10:45 pm

I think the double bill of Fists of Fury and Five Fingers of Death did pretty well back in the day…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Sunrise Drive-In on Oct 1, 2016 at 6:49 pm

Pic of the first attraction “Start Cheering” posted in photos. This picture had opened at the Rialto in Times Square on March 16, 1938. The NY Times said “Unsinkably buoyed by the comical intensity of Jimmy Durante, "Start Cheering,” at the Rialto, turns out to be one of the funniest of the year’s admittedly minor productions…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Sunrise Drive-In on Oct 1, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Pic of the dive-in site today in photos.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Rivoli Theatre on Sep 26, 2016 at 11:58 pm

There’s a NYTimes article in the photo section that raises those issues.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Fair Theatre on Sep 16, 2016 at 7:01 pm

Neely O'Hara says, Art films? Nudies! That’s all they are. Nudies.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about AMC Empire 25 on Sep 15, 2016 at 3:59 pm

But, but… Did they have a souvenir program for The Ten Commandments? (My collection is incomplete…)

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about PlayStation Theater on Sep 11, 2016 at 12:01 am

The NYTimes obituary states there were 1440 seats in this house…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about PlayStation Theater on Sep 10, 2016 at 11:57 pm

The very first comment on this thread mentions there were 1500+ seats, not exactly an exact count…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Pavilion Theatre on Sep 6, 2016 at 10:13 pm

Article, continued

If the Nitehawk is the movie-theater equivalent of an enduringly cool kid with a man bun, the Pavilion is more of a Miss Havisham with some questionable late-in-life cosmetic tweaks.

Perched on the westernmost corner of Prospect Park, the cinema opened as a 1,516-seat, Wurlitzer-equipped theater, the Sanders, in 1928, and for decades suffered the indignities of old age. It was shuttered in 1978, reopened as the Pavilion with three screens in 1996, then divided into nine screens in the 2000s. Local blogs meticulously pored over its decline, noting its trash-strewn, thickly sticky floors, ripped upholstery and frequently broken toilets; patrons bemoaned it as well, collectively giving it a two-star rating on Yelp.

New operators took over in 2011, adding leather seats, new carpet and fresh paint, but Park Slope cineastes would not be swayed. “There were pieces of tissue paper in my drink cup,” one patron wrote on Yelp this year. “I grab a booster for my kid and it’s covered in gum and melted gummy candy,” groused another.

The Pavilion’s long march toward Nitehawkhood began five years ago, when Mr. Viragh approached Hidrock Properties (then Hidrock Realty), which had bought the Pavilion for $16 million in 2006.

Mr. Viragh and Steven J. Hidary, whose family owns Hidrock, discussed making the theater a Nitehawk, but with the Williamsburg location also opening in 2011, the timing was off. Then, several years ago, Mr. Hidary said his family “wanted to bring out the full potential of the site.” The plan, which caused local consternation, was to build condominiums while also retaining a three- or four-screen theater. Last year, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission approved a six-story condo conversion for the one-story building adjoining the Pavilion, with units also to be built on the cinema’s second floor. Then Mr. Viragh came forward with investors who wanted to buy the theater and give Nitehawk a long-term lease.

Brooklyn’s residential building boom has led to concerns about market oversaturation, but Mr. Hidary said that the company’s decision was not affected by a softening real estate market, because Hidrock bought relatively low and just two dozen units would be built on a prime site. Condos might have even made them more money, but “we had to decide, do we build condos or do we save Brooklyn?” said Mr. Hidary, who is from Midwood. “So we saved Brooklyn.”

The sale of the theater, for $28 million to 188 Prospect Park West L.L.C., closed on Aug. 26, according to Mr. Viragh and Mr. Hidary, with Hidrock still owning the adjoining one-story site. (Mr. Hidary said that there were no current plans to build condominiums there.) Emails to Ben Kafash, one of the Pavilion’s operators, were not immediately returned.

Brad Lander, a city councilman who fought to keep a cinema at the site, said that while the Pavilion might not have been beloved, “losing a movie theater would’ve been a blow,” adding, “It’s a center of Park Slope family life.”

The new Nitehawk will add to the boomlet in specialty art-house cinemas in New York City, which includes the Metrograph on the Lower East Side and the Syndicated, in Bushwick, Brooklyn. A branch of the Alamo Drafthouse, with seven screens and 798 seats, is set to open in Downtown Brooklyn this fall, while the Quad Cinema in Greenwich Village is being refurbished for opening at an undetermined date.

“We want to elevate the cinema experience, because that’s what it’s all about,” Mr. Viragh said. “How rare is it to save a theater in New York, and not make it into a Duane Reade or a Starbucks?”

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Pavilion Theatre on Sep 6, 2016 at 10:11 pm

Text of article:

Nitehawk to Open a Second Cinema in Brooklyn

Park Slope, Brooklyn, hang on to your strollers. The Pavilion, the neighborhood’s lone remaining movie house — one frequently criticized for varying degrees of neglect — is to be transformed into a Nitehawk theater, set to open early fall 2017. Plans to add condominiums to the site, made before the Nitehawk entered negotiations with the building’s owners, have been scrapped.

This will be the first expansion for team Nitehawk, which opened the popular dine-in boutique cinema in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, in 2011. In an era of megabudget superhero flicks and ever-better television, Nitehawk thrived, proving that if you build a three-screen artisanal movie house in a hipster-rich neighborhood and serve burrata, kale salad and cocktails tableside, they will come. The new multiplex, to be rechristened Nitehawk Prospect Park, will have seven screens, a total of 650 seats, a double kitchen, two bar areas, a restored atrium overlooking the park, and, of course, in-theater dining, according to Matthew Viragh, Nitehawk Cinema’s founder.

The Pavilion will be closed by the end of October, he added. Renovations, which should cost less than $10 million, are expected to take about a year.

“We’ve always wanted to do more locations,” Mr. Viragh said. “Our focus is Brooklyn; we want to be a neighborhood cinema. That’s in our DNA, to cater to this area.”


Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Kings Theatre on Sep 6, 2016 at 6:08 pm

More than one party looked into multiplexing this place but given its dimensions it proved impractical.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 4, 2016 at 3:53 am

Here’s an excerpt from the NYTimes' review of this theater’s first “pictorial attraction:”

Radio City Music Hall yesterday became a motion picture theatre, with the Columbia film “The Bitter Tea of General Yen” as its first offering. The RKO Roxy, the smaller theatre in Radio City, continues to exhibit the screen version of Philip Barry’s play, “The Animal Kingdom.”

It gladdened the hearts of the management to observe the imposing throngs at the doors of the Music Hall for its initial performance as a cinema. Most of the lower-priced seats were filled before 1 o'clock in the afternoon, and later there were lines of persons in the grand foyer and along the Fiftieth Street side of the house awaiting admission. Even the loge chairs were well patronized.

The acoustics of the great auditorium are suited admirably to the showing of talking pictures. The projection booths were installed during the construction of the theatre, but the screen, one 70 by 40 feet, was installed after it was decided to run it as a motion picture theatre.

In addition to the feature film, the program is as follows:

Excerpts from “Faust,” with Alida Vane, Aroldo Lindi and Max Ratjmiroff.

“The Sunburst,” with the Radio City Roxyettes.

“Spanish Twist,” a pictorial cartoon.

“The Story of the Walts,” with Patricia Bowman, Gomez and Winona, the ballet corps and choral ensemble.

The Tuskegee Singers.

Ray Bolger.

“Marche Militaire,” by Franz Schubert, with the ballet corps and the Roxyettes.

An organ recital.

This stage show evidently pleased the audience, but it cannot be said to be very different from other exhibitions of singing and dancing offered by Mr. Rothafel. One might also say that it would be materially helped by more humor and fewer exhibitions of dancing.

The screen attraction, “The Bitter Tea of General Yen,” is a handsomely mounted affair with conspicuously good portrayals by Nils Asther and Walter Connolly. It is a melodrama of China that has certain aspects of Edith M. Hull’s “The Sheik.” It is a story that is scarcely plausible but which has the saving grace of being fairly entertaining. Certain characters are called upon to be exceptionally credulous at times and those who can overlook this and other shortcomings will probably find the tale of missionaries, romance and civil war in China diverting.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Sep 3, 2016 at 10:55 pm

Opening paragraph of the NYTimes' review of Marooned:

IT seems fitting that a handsome, professional and future-minded space drama in fine color, like “Marooned,” should open a new jewel box of a theater, the Ziegfeld.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 3, 2016 at 11:32 am

I’m glad you’re here, CC. Your collection is amazing and I am pleased that your are sharing it.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Ziegfeld Theatre on Sep 2, 2016 at 9:46 pm

Early tomorrow morning at 4am TCM is running this theater’s opening attraction Marooned.

By coincidence or design at 6:15am they are showing The Bitter Tea of General Yen, the opening attraction of Radio City Music Hall…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 2, 2016 at 9:43 pm

Early tomorrow morning at 6:15am TCM is running this theater’s opening attraction The Bitter Tea of General Yen. By coincidence or design at 4am they are showing Marooned, the opening attraction of the Ziegfeld…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 2, 2016 at 2:07 pm

Bill, what was the occasion for the Blazing Saddles screening, and what did Mel have to say about Gene Wilder?

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Sep 2, 2016 at 2:05 pm

It was probably Last of the Red Hot Lovers, about which Roger Greenspun of The New York Times said: “In the dismal history of Neil Simon screenplays and adaptations for the screen, The Last of the Red Hot Lovers may represent the lowest ebb…

But I’m glad you have good memories of it, or at least of your visit to this magnificent house.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Capitol Theatre on Sep 1, 2016 at 12:44 pm

Good grief, with that line-up of roadshow offerings it’s a good thing theaters didn’t have the new reclining seats or the racket of snoring would have drowned out the soundtracks…!

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Malverne Cinema on Sep 1, 2016 at 12:46 am

I’m pretty sure this theater has five screens, not six…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts on Aug 31, 2016 at 9:05 pm

Saw a show here last night – Celtic Thunder – and the house is big and lovely, subdued and tasteful in the Art Deco style. Well worth a visit if you’re in the area.

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Capitol Theatre on Aug 30, 2016 at 12:57 am

If I recall correctly, some were cut and some were uncut…

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Capitol Theatre on Aug 29, 2016 at 10:33 pm

I kind of remember a hard ticket for Caligula. (Something was hard, anyway…)

Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about Radio City Music Hall on Aug 29, 2016 at 6:52 pm

Ann-Margret was on Johnny Carson last night from December 13, 1978 promoting her special called “Rockette: A Holiday Tribute to Radio City Music Hall”

They were both wondering if the Music Hall would survive… Ann thought there was a lot of life left, Johnny was more pessimistic… (As we now know, RCMH ended its movie/stage show format about four months later, and after years of nail-biting drama, it’s still in show business nearly 40 years later.)

Here is a short clip I found from the special; I wish I could see the rest. :(


Mike (saps)
Mike (saps) commented about AMC Loews 34th Street 14 on Aug 24, 2016 at 6:45 pm

Here’s the text of that petition. (It’s heartfelt if not a little looney…)

As many movie theaters in NYC, the AMC Loews 34th Street 14 theater has been plagued by bed bugs. Just last month there was a report from people being bitten and these reports go back months. (

The anxiety exists for NYC movie patrons who would like to attend press screenings as seat fillers. However most blockbusters end up getting a screening at the 34th Street theater instead of a bed bug free theater.

One suggestion would be the AMC Loews Lincoln Square 13 or the Regal E-Walk Stadium 13 & RPX. Both of which can carry large audiences.

The outlets or whoever is responsible for organizing these screenings are being kindly asked to consider changing the venue until the AMC Loews 34th Street 14 theater has been cleaned from any possible bed bug plague.

As a reminder, a similar theater was shut down because of the same problem; the AMC Empire 25.

And as stated above, there are other venues (including from AMC) who could replace this common venue temporarily for screenings.

Please consider our petition.