Comments from Coate

Showing 51 - 75 of 1,140 comments

Coate
Coate commented about Syosset Triplex on Mar 13, 2015 at 4:00 pm

I’m aware “Oklahoma!” was screened here once for the theater’s grand opening in November 1956, but how long did it play when it returned a few weeks later for an actual multi-week (reserved-seat?) booking? Anyone know? NYer?

Coate
Coate commented about Eglinton Theatre on Mar 10, 2015 at 10:09 am

“The Sound of Music” premiered here fifty years ago today. With a reserved-seat run of 146 weeks, I imagine it’s the long-run record holder for this venue.

Coate
Coate commented about Saban Theatre on Mar 10, 2015 at 10:07 am

“The Sound of Music” premiered here fifty years ago today. With a reserved-seat run of 94 weeks, I imagine it’s the long-run record holder for this venue.

Coate
Coate commented about Capitol Theatre on Mar 6, 2015 at 9:05 pm

bigjoe59… I’m curious why you consistently refer to the modern roadshow era as 1955 through 1972? There were roadshows before AND after that timeframe. Is it that you’re thinking of that specifically as the “large-format/roadshow” era? If so, why not move up the starting year to 1952 so that the first two Cinerama movies can be included? After all, the so-called modern roadshow era really kicked off with 1952’s “This Is Cinerama” rather than with “Oklahoma!” in 1955. But if you’re not even referring specifically to large-format/stereophonic sound releases, then roadshows can be traced back to the turn of the century.

And, for what it’s worth, I’d like to point out that 1972’s “Man of La Mancha” probably shouldn’t be considered the final roadshow release, even though you and several others (including Kim Holston in his recently-published “Movie Roadshows” book) routinely cite it as such. “Last Tango in Paris,” for instance, had numerous reserved-seat bookings in 1973. And if you really want to get picky, there were several “modified roadshow” (i.e. reserved-performance engagements) throughout the 1970s and even into the early 1980s (i.e. “Funny Lady,” “Kazablan,” “The Deer Hunter,” “Apocalypse Now,” “Star Trek: The Motion Picture,” “Napoleon” re-release, etc.).

Coate
Coate commented about Showcase Cinemas Eastgate on Mar 6, 2015 at 10:08 am

Thanks, THolloway, for clarifying everything and for posting the vintage images.

Coate
Coate commented about Showcase Cinemas Eastgate on Mar 6, 2015 at 9:23 am

…or a Grand Opening event? In which case, the opening probably would’ve been in December, rather than November, since that’s when Flash Gordon opened.

Coate
Coate commented about Showcase Cinemas Eastgate on Mar 6, 2015 at 6:46 am

From the overview… “The complex opened in November of 1980 with the world premiere of “Flash Gordon”. Italian actress Ornella Muti who played Princess Aura, attended the screening. It was covered by local and national news.”

The world premiere? Why would the world premiere of Flash Gordon have been held in Cincinnati? What was the connection? Is it possible the screening in question was actually just a regional premiere, or a sneak preview, a test or exhibitor screening or some other pre-release type of screening?

Coate
Coate commented about Happy 45th, "The Sound Of Music" on Mar 2, 2015 at 9:23 am

Happy 50th to “The Sound of Music,” which world premiered at the Rivoli on this day in 1965.

By the way, I’m in the process of updating this article for the film’s 50th anniversary, so please contact me (or post here) if you note anything that ought to be added, deleted, updated, corrected, etc. Thank you.

Coate
Coate commented about Rivoli Theatre on Mar 2, 2015 at 9:20 am

Happy 50th to “The Sound of Music,” which world premiered at the Rivoli on this day in 1965.

On a related note, some longtime Cinema Treasures readers might recall a Sound of Music 45th anniversary retrospective article I posted here five years ago. I’m in the process of updating it for the 50th anniversary, so please contact me (or post here or on the article’s page) if you note anything that ought to be added, deleted, updated, corrected, etc. Thank you.

Coate
Coate commented about Movies at The Market Fair 10 on Feb 15, 2015 at 9:56 pm

UATC08… What movies ran here in a 70mm presentation?

Coate
Coate commented about Sheridan Theatre on Jan 21, 2015 at 12:23 am

patryan6019… What does that have to do with “Gone With the Wind” or the Sheridan?

Coate
Coate commented about Boyd Theatre on Jan 19, 2015 at 8:35 pm

Seventy-five years ago today the Boyd opened “Gone With the Wind.“ The opening was preceded by a premiere the day before, and the engagement was concurrent with a booking at the Earle.

Coate
Coate commented about Sheridan Theatre on Jan 17, 2015 at 8:48 am

Seventy-five years ago today the Sheridan premiered “Gone With the Wind.” (The Sheridan was the only theater where the film opened on that date despite erroneous Internet claims of a nationwide release commencing on that date.)

Coate
Coate commented about Loew's State Theatre on Jan 7, 2015 at 12:20 pm

EnnisCAdkins on August 12, 2008, wrote: “According to several articles I’ve read regarding Houston theatres, GONE WITH THE WIND opened at the Loew’s State in early 1940 and played for over a year in that one theatre. It then moved over to the Kirby for several more months.”

Which articles are making that outrageous claim?

Coate
Coate commented about Barstow Station Cinema 6 on Dec 18, 2014 at 2:20 am

The Barstow Station Cinema opened with four screens on August 2, 1985. The debut bookings were “Back to the Future,” “Mad Mad Beyond Thunderdome,” “Pale Rider” and “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial.”

Coate
Coate commented about Loew's Grand Theatre on Dec 15, 2014 at 5:24 pm

“Gone With the Wind”… Happy 75th! Premiered here this day in 1939.

Coate
Coate commented about Century's Plainview on Dec 2, 2014 at 11:48 pm

Thank you, NYer.

Coate
Coate commented about Century's Plainview on Nov 24, 2014 at 12:47 pm

What booking followed the roadshow of “My Fair Lady”? Was “My Fair Lady” the longest-running engagement at this theater?

Coate
Coate commented about Century 21 on Nov 24, 2014 at 11:22 am

Happy 50th! The Century 21 opened this day in 1964.

To celebrate, here’s a list of the Century 21’s bookings during its first decade as researched from their original newspaper promotion.

1964-11-24 … IT’S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD (19 weeks)

1965-04-06 … MY FAIR LADY (33)
1965-11-24 … THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES (15)

1966-03-09 … THE GREATEST STORY EVER TOLD (14)
1966-06-15 … BATTLE OF THE BULGE (9)
1966-08-17 … DOCTOR ZHIVAGO (58)

1967-09-26 … GRAND PRIX (43)

1968-07-23 … 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (87)

Coate
Coate commented about Rosna Theatre on Nov 22, 2014 at 1:00 pm

Michelemichaels430…. “2001: A Space Odyssey” has indeed been mentioned “here” both in a comment posted on March 18, 2008 and in a related article linked under News About This Theater (located on the right margin of this page underneath the map and nearby theaters).

Coate
Coate commented about UA Cinema 150 on Nov 13, 2014 at 3:43 pm

It’s been documented that “Hello, Dolly!” was the first movie to play at the UA Cinema 150. What was the second movie to play there?

Coate
Coate commented about Glendale Theatre on Nov 12, 2014 at 10:26 am

Here’s an article from a few days ago published in the Toronto Star that some may find of interest. The Glendale and other Toronto cinemas are mentioned (and some might recognize a Cinema Treasures contributor quoted in the piece).

Find Toronto’s favourite movies

We Torontonians like to think of ourselves as visionary sophisticates, the kind of people who would prefer to boldly reach for the stars, rather than doggedly climb every mountain.

Our choice of favourite movies suggests otherwise. I thought I was on safe ground last week when I declared 2001: A Space Odyssey to be T.O.’s all-time most popular cinematic experience, going by what two sources (and personal memory) indicated was a four-year run at the old Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. I believed that to be the longest a movie has ever played in one theatre in the city for a continuous run.

Tim Elliott, a Toronto movie buff and collector, contacted me with a contrary assertion: The Sound of Music edged 2001for popularity honours. The Sound of Music, a musical in which Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer climb every mountain that love, geography and the Nazis hurl at them, played for 144 weeks at the Eglinton Theatre, which still stands but no longer operates as a movie house. The film made toes tap and tugged at heartstrings at the Eglinton from March 10, 1965 to Dec. 21, 1967.

A few months after The Sound of Music closed, 2001: A Space Odyssey opened at the Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. The outer space adventure billed as “the ultimate trip” seared eyeballs and dazzled brains there for a total of 127 weeks, roughly 2.5 years, from May 30, 1968 to Nov. 3, 1970 — and it screened in the widescreen marvel known as Cinerama, no less. The Glendale no longer exists, sadly, having been demolished in the 1970s and replaced by a car dealership.

“These were both the longest single engagements in the city, as far as I know,” Elliott, 62, told me via email.

He bases this on his study of movie ads in the Toronto Star and other newspapers, “a hobby of mine since seeing my first grown-up film Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1961 as a kid and falling in love with Audrey Hepburn and the movies and movie theatres.

“In my basement I have file drawers filled with the movie ads from all of the Toronto newspapers from the ’60s on. I also used to keep lists of most of the theatres of Toronto and write down each movie that played in each one and how long they played. Unfortunately, I misplaced those lists during a move and haven’t seen them in years.”

But he managed to keep a lot of stats on movie engagements, including these other long runs in Toronto:

Ben-Hur (77 weeks): Dec. 23, 1959 to May 4, 1961 at the University.

Funny Girl (68 weeks): Oct. 3, 1968 to Jan. 22, 1970 at the Odeon Fairlawn.

Doctor Zhivago (61 weeks): Oct. 16, 1966 to Dec. 21, 1967 at the Nortown (it followed a 28-week run at the University, for a total of 89 weeks).

My Fair Lady (60 weeks): Oct. 28, 1964 to Dec. 21, 1965 at the University (it moved to the Nortown on Dec. 25 for a seven-week run that continued to Feb. 9, 1966).

Fiddler on the Roof (57 weeks): Nov. 10, 1971 until Dec. 12, 1972 at the University.

MAS*H (53 weeks): March 27, 1970 to April 8, 1971 at the Hollywood.

There have also been long engagements of close to a year or more for the original Star Wars, Oliver!, Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines, The Gods Must Be Crazy and La Cage Aux Folles, among others. Note that these achievements were all notched mainly during the 1960s and ’70s, before the widespread adoption of colour TV, multiplex theatres and home video. Then came the Internet and VOD (video on demand), which changed things further still. Most of these records also precede the blockbuster era, where it became commonplace to open a movie at many theatres at once, rather than have it take up residence in a single prestigious theatre for a “road show” run. It’s almost impossible now to think of movies having a lengthy run in a single Toronto theatre, although there are exceptions. Avatar ran in the Scotiabank theatre for nearly six months, from Dec. 18, 2009 to May 27, 2010, and it remained in the Toronto market at least until June of that year, says Cineplex spokesman Mike Langdon. He adds there’s nothing to stop a film from setting a record. “For us, we will leave a film on screen as long as there is demand from the guests to see it. Our guests determine how long a run actually is.” I recall that Titanic also had a very lengthy run in Toronto, perhaps as long as Avatar, both films having been directed by Ontario-born James Cameron. Cineplex doesn’t have ready access to screening stats, and neither does Paramount, the studio that released Titanic. But the intrepid Astrid Lange in the Star’s library found that it played at the Uptown theatre from Dec. 19, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It moved from the Uptown to the Uptown Backstage on July 1 for another few weeks. Sad to think that most of the single-screen theatres where records were set are now demolished or otherwise unavailable: Uptown, University, Odeon Fairlawn, Nortown, Hollywood, Eglinton. All gone. It comes as no surprise that all of these movies are mainstream crowd-pleasers, although 2001: A Space Odyssey also qualifies as an art house head-scratcher. But three of Toronto’s all-time favourites are space movies: 2001, Avatar and Stars Wars. So maybe we’re visionaries after all.

Coate
Coate commented about University Theatre on Nov 12, 2014 at 10:24 am

Here’s an article from a few days ago published in the Toronto Star that some may find of interest. The University and other Toronto cinemas are mentioned (and some might recognize a Cinema Treasures contributor quoted in the piece).

Find Toronto’s favourite movies

We Torontonians like to think of ourselves as visionary sophisticates, the kind of people who would prefer to boldly reach for the stars, rather than doggedly climb every mountain.

Our choice of favourite movies suggests otherwise. I thought I was on safe ground last week when I declared 2001: A Space Odyssey to be T.O.’s all-time most popular cinematic experience, going by what two sources (and personal memory) indicated was a four-year run at the old Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. I believed that to be the longest a movie has ever played in one theatre in the city for a continuous run.

Tim Elliott, a Toronto movie buff and collector, contacted me with a contrary assertion: The Sound of Music edged 2001for popularity honours. The Sound of Music, a musical in which Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer climb every mountain that love, geography and the Nazis hurl at them, played for 144 weeks at the Eglinton Theatre, which still stands but no longer operates as a movie house. The film made toes tap and tugged at heartstrings at the Eglinton from March 10, 1965 to Dec. 21, 1967.

A few months after The Sound of Music closed, 2001: A Space Odyssey opened at the Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. The outer space adventure billed as “the ultimate trip” seared eyeballs and dazzled brains there for a total of 127 weeks, roughly 2.5 years, from May 30, 1968 to Nov. 3, 1970 — and it screened in the widescreen marvel known as Cinerama, no less. The Glendale no longer exists, sadly, having been demolished in the 1970s and replaced by a car dealership.

“These were both the longest single engagements in the city, as far as I know,” Elliott, 62, told me via email.

He bases this on his study of movie ads in the Toronto Star and other newspapers, “a hobby of mine since seeing my first grown-up film Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1961 as a kid and falling in love with Audrey Hepburn and the movies and movie theatres.

“In my basement I have file drawers filled with the movie ads from all of the Toronto newspapers from the ’60s on. I also used to keep lists of most of the theatres of Toronto and write down each movie that played in each one and how long they played. Unfortunately, I misplaced those lists during a move and haven’t seen them in years.”

But he managed to keep a lot of stats on movie engagements, including these other long runs in Toronto:

Ben-Hur (77 weeks): Dec. 23, 1959 to May 4, 1961 at the University.

Funny Girl (68 weeks): Oct. 3, 1968 to Jan. 22, 1970 at the Odeon Fairlawn.

Doctor Zhivago (61 weeks): Oct. 16, 1966 to Dec. 21, 1967 at the Nortown (it followed a 28-week run at the University, for a total of 89 weeks).

My Fair Lady (60 weeks): Oct. 28, 1964 to Dec. 21, 1965 at the University (it moved to the Nortown on Dec. 25 for a seven-week run that continued to Feb. 9, 1966).

Fiddler on the Roof (57 weeks): Nov. 10, 1971 until Dec. 12, 1972 at the University.

MAS*H (53 weeks): March 27, 1970 to April 8, 1971 at the Hollywood.

There have also been long engagements of close to a year or more for the original Star Wars, Oliver!, Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines, The Gods Must Be Crazy and La Cage Aux Folles, among others. Note that these achievements were all notched mainly during the 1960s and ’70s, before the widespread adoption of colour TV, multiplex theatres and home video. Then came the Internet and VOD (video on demand), which changed things further still. Most of these records also precede the blockbuster era, where it became commonplace to open a movie at many theatres at once, rather than have it take up residence in a single prestigious theatre for a “road show” run. It’s almost impossible now to think of movies having a lengthy run in a single Toronto theatre, although there are exceptions. Avatar ran in the Scotiabank theatre for nearly six months, from Dec. 18, 2009 to May 27, 2010, and it remained in the Toronto market at least until June of that year, says Cineplex spokesman Mike Langdon. He adds there’s nothing to stop a film from setting a record. “For us, we will leave a film on screen as long as there is demand from the guests to see it. Our guests determine how long a run actually is.” I recall that Titanic also had a very lengthy run in Toronto, perhaps as long as Avatar, both films having been directed by Ontario-born James Cameron. Cineplex doesn’t have ready access to screening stats, and neither does Paramount, the studio that released Titanic. But the intrepid Astrid Lange in the Star’s library found that it played at the Uptown theatre from Dec. 19, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It moved from the Uptown to the Uptown Backstage on July 1 for another few weeks. Sad to think that most of the single-screen theatres where records were set are now demolished or otherwise unavailable: Uptown, University, Odeon Fairlawn, Nortown, Hollywood, Eglinton. All gone. It comes as no surprise that all of these movies are mainstream crowd-pleasers, although 2001: A Space Odyssey also qualifies as an art house head-scratcher. But three of Toronto’s all-time favourites are space movies: 2001, Avatar and Stars Wars. So maybe we’re visionaries after all.

Coate
Coate commented about Eglinton Theatre on Nov 12, 2014 at 10:23 am

Here’s an article from a few days ago published in the Toronto Star that some may find of interest. The Eglinton and other Toronto cinemas are mentioned (and some might recognize a Cinema Treasures contributor quoted in the piece).

Find Toronto’s favourite movies

We Torontonians like to think of ourselves as visionary sophisticates, the kind of people who would prefer to boldly reach for the stars, rather than doggedly climb every mountain.

Our choice of favourite movies suggests otherwise. I thought I was on safe ground last week when I declared 2001: A Space Odyssey to be T.O.’s all-time most popular cinematic experience, going by what two sources (and personal memory) indicated was a four-year run at the old Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. I believed that to be the longest a movie has ever played in one theatre in the city for a continuous run.

Tim Elliott, a Toronto movie buff and collector, contacted me with a contrary assertion: The Sound of Music edged 2001for popularity honours. The Sound of Music, a musical in which Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer climb every mountain that love, geography and the Nazis hurl at them, played for 144 weeks at the Eglinton Theatre, which still stands but no longer operates as a movie house. The film made toes tap and tugged at heartstrings at the Eglinton from March 10, 1965 to Dec. 21, 1967.

A few months after The Sound of Music closed, 2001: A Space Odyssey opened at the Glendale theatre on Avenue Rd. The outer space adventure billed as “the ultimate trip” seared eyeballs and dazzled brains there for a total of 127 weeks, roughly 2.5 years, from May 30, 1968 to Nov. 3, 1970 — and it screened in the widescreen marvel known as Cinerama, no less. The Glendale no longer exists, sadly, having been demolished in the 1970s and replaced by a car dealership.

“These were both the longest single engagements in the city, as far as I know,” Elliott, 62, told me via email.

He bases this on his study of movie ads in the Toronto Star and other newspapers, “a hobby of mine since seeing my first grown-up film Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1961 as a kid and falling in love with Audrey Hepburn and the movies and movie theatres.

“In my basement I have file drawers filled with the movie ads from all of the Toronto newspapers from the ’60s on. I also used to keep lists of most of the theatres of Toronto and write down each movie that played in each one and how long they played. Unfortunately, I misplaced those lists during a move and haven’t seen them in years.”

But he managed to keep a lot of stats on movie engagements, including these other long runs in Toronto:

Ben-Hur (77 weeks): Dec. 23, 1959 to May 4, 1961 at the University.

Funny Girl (68 weeks): Oct. 3, 1968 to Jan. 22, 1970 at the Odeon Fairlawn.

Doctor Zhivago (61 weeks): Oct. 16, 1966 to Dec. 21, 1967 at the Nortown (it followed a 28-week run at the University, for a total of 89 weeks).

My Fair Lady (60 weeks): Oct. 28, 1964 to Dec. 21, 1965 at the University (it moved to the Nortown on Dec. 25 for a seven-week run that continued to Feb. 9, 1966).

Fiddler on the Roof (57 weeks): Nov. 10, 1971 until Dec. 12, 1972 at the University.

MAS*H (53 weeks): March 27, 1970 to April 8, 1971 at the Hollywood.

There have also been long engagements of close to a year or more for the original Star Wars, Oliver!, Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines, The Gods Must Be Crazy and La Cage Aux Folles, among others. Note that these achievements were all notched mainly during the 1960s and ’70s, before the widespread adoption of colour TV, multiplex theatres and home video. Then came the Internet and VOD (video on demand), which changed things further still. Most of these records also precede the blockbuster era, where it became commonplace to open a movie at many theatres at once, rather than have it take up residence in a single prestigious theatre for a “road show” run. It’s almost impossible now to think of movies having a lengthy run in a single Toronto theatre, although there are exceptions. Avatar ran in the Scotiabank theatre for nearly six months, from Dec. 18, 2009 to May 27, 2010, and it remained in the Toronto market at least until June of that year, says Cineplex spokesman Mike Langdon. He adds there’s nothing to stop a film from setting a record. “For us, we will leave a film on screen as long as there is demand from the guests to see it. Our guests determine how long a run actually is.” I recall that Titanic also had a very lengthy run in Toronto, perhaps as long as Avatar, both films having been directed by Ontario-born James Cameron. Cineplex doesn’t have ready access to screening stats, and neither does Paramount, the studio that released Titanic. But the intrepid Astrid Lange in the Star’s library found that it played at the Uptown theatre from Dec. 19, 1997 to June 30, 1998. It moved from the Uptown to the Uptown Backstage on July 1 for another few weeks. Sad to think that most of the single-screen theatres where records were set are now demolished or otherwise unavailable: Uptown, University, Odeon Fairlawn, Nortown, Hollywood, Eglinton. All gone. It comes as no surprise that all of these movies are mainstream crowd-pleasers, although 2001: A Space Odyssey also qualifies as an art house head-scratcher. But three of Toronto’s all-time favourites are space movies: 2001, Avatar and Stars Wars. So maybe we’re visionaries after all.

Coate
Coate commented about Coronet Theatre on Oct 29, 2014 at 11:53 am

Happy 50th! “My Fair Lady” opened at the Coronet on this day in 1964 (and went on to become one of the theater’s longest-running engagements).