Comments from buckguy

Showing 1 - 25 of 33 comments

buckguy
buckguy commented about Colony Theatre on Dec 30, 2010 at 10:14 pm

The address should be “West Central Avenue”.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Mentor Twin Drive-In on May 9, 2010 at 9:44 pm

The K-Mart opened in the 70s, before the drive-in closed.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Westwood Theatre of the Arts on May 9, 2010 at 9:30 pm

The Westwood presumably was owned by the same owners as the Westwood, Heights and Continental in Cleveland during the 60s and 70s—same logo and films as the Heights & Westwood (the Continental went toward blaxploitation fare in its later days). Whereas the Cleveland theaters quit showing X-rated films in the 70s, the Westwood continued to do so. The theater anchored what used to be the shopping district for what was known as “West Toledo”.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Colony Theatre on May 9, 2010 at 9:11 pm

This theater was part of an early suburban shopping district known as the “The Colony” centered around Monroe Street and Central Avenue which served and upscale clientele.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Cla-Zel Theatre on May 9, 2010 at 9:05 pm

Bowling Green had yet another theater on E Wooster Street near I-75. The address was a long the lines of 1616 E Wooster. It opened around 1970 and closed in the mid- to late-80s. It was part of a chronically underperforming plaza that included a Great Scot super market and Gray Drug, along with a strip of small shops. I think it was simply the Cinema or named for the plaza (may have been College Plaza or University Plaza). I think it always had at least two screens. It tended to get 1st run films before the Cla-Zel, which spent many years as a low price, second/third run theater.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Shore Theatre on May 2, 2010 at 7:59 pm

I’ll take a look the next time I’m in Cleveland. There was a long running bank that was either across the alley to the parking lot next to Podboy’s Lounge or the one next to Northeast Appliance. it was Second Federal (later renamed Cardinal Federal) and probably taken over by someone else during the S&L debacle of the 80s. There always were entrances to the parking lot, one of them just got larger once the theater was demolished. We always parked in back and walked along the side by Northeast Appliance. Access was possible from Lake Shore, but more convenient from Shore Center Drive (which is what ran in back).

The Pick-n-Pay remained a Pick-n-Pay until it closed. It’s now a new build Walgreens which probably has a footprint identical to that of the old super market.

The Shore’s one distinction was having a “starlight” ceiling with small painted stars that glowed in the dark. It was the only neighborhood or suburban theater I remember having such a feature. Even during the 60s, it was a second string theater which often showed double features and occasionally showed a re-release of something many years old. Then it began to co-book with drive-ins and then had a rather short life as a dollar theater. In my time, it was always considered “not as nice” as the Lake.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Naylor Theatre on May 2, 2010 at 7:33 pm

The Sears closed and subsequently was demolished and replaced by a Safeway in the 90s.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Mall Theatres on May 2, 2010 at 7:31 pm

This building was not demolished after its closure, it was put to other use. I believe that the Euclid Avenue side was an S&H green stamp redemption center. That building had a large blank wall with a decorative sign that was probably 3 stories, which would be the sort of thing that would have replaced a theater. On the Superior side were several savings and loans, one of which probably absorbed the theater space on that side.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Uptown Theatre on Feb 27, 2010 at 12:59 pm

St. Clair & 105th was far more than a few blocks from Loew’s Park & the Keith’s 105th.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Doan Theatre on Feb 27, 2010 at 12:57 pm

Doan’s Creek is what runs along MLK (formerly Liberty Blvd), through the cultural gardens to Wade Park Lagoon. Doan’s Corners had died out as a name for Euclid-105, but Doan still had resonance, and was on the Glenville side of Liberty.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Ezella Theatre on Feb 27, 2010 at 12:52 pm

The Yale would have been at the end of Yale Ave, where it met St. Clair, just past Liberty Blvd/MLK.

The Ezella was part of a small business district that included an A&P and a Kresge (one of the few neigborhood Kresges’s to survive their big store closing round in the early 60s). The A&P survived into the early 1970s.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Edwards Drive-In on Jan 17, 2010 at 4:28 pm

This was known locally as “The Arcadia Drive-in”. It was on the very edge of Arcadia proper.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Northeast Plaza Cinema on Jan 16, 2010 at 12:01 am

Loehmann’s Plaza is on the other side of I-85 on N. Druid Hills Road where it meets Briarcliff. Northeast Plaza was an old strip center rehabbed around 1998 and the theatre was part of the effort, along with the Publix market. The center opened with mainstream stores and gradually became a mix of ethnic/Latino and low end stores like thrift shops and pay day loan places.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Fine Art Theatre on Jan 15, 2010 at 6:38 pm

Has it been demolished? I would have thought that the bad economy would have save d the structure, if not the theatre. For years I attended Peachtree Film Society screenings here. They were well attended but the Film Society dissolved anyway. Atlanta is a place where indie films do well, but the infrastructure doesn’t seem to last. LeFont once had multiple theatres, and did so as recently as 10 years ago. There have been multiple efforts to have a big national film festival, but they’ve all failed to make money—Peachtree overreached in ‘98 and took years to recover with a somewhat smaller group running it. the desire to build a festival as other cities have and to have a niche or regional focus seemed to be beyond what promoters wanted, so no there’s less than before. Landmark did a nice job of rehabbing a badly degraded venue, but there’s nothing like seeing a film in a real theatre, as opposed to multiplex.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Regal Hollywood 24 on Jan 15, 2010 at 6:28 pm

An ugly and unmemorable place to see movies with fairly indifferent staff.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Shore Theatre on Jan 2, 2010 at 1:23 pm

The Shore had been closed for several years by 1977. At that point, it had a leaking roof and there was standing water in the auditorium, according to people involved in early efforts to redevelop the area. These problems made it difficult to do anything with the theatre, which was surrounded by more or less functional, if aging businesses. Parking was in the rear near the bowling alley. For many years, the theatre’s neighbor, Northeast Appliance would have a row of televisions playing in their display window, even if the store was closed—it was good advertising for the movies' major competitor. Northeast outlasted the theatre by quite a few years. The theatre’s demise had nothing to do with the Lake theatre. Instead, it was torn down as part of the construction of a new Finast (later Tops) super market, which replaced a long running Pick-n-Pay store that was across the street (Finast and Pick-n-Pay had the same ownership by that point).

buckguy
buckguy commented about Carter Theater on Dec 10, 2009 at 6:36 pm

they must have played off the Carter (aka Pick-Carter) Hotel that looks like it was caddy corner to the theatre. Did this site wind up being part of the Cleveland Trust tower?

buckguy
buckguy commented about Ontario Theater on Dec 9, 2009 at 10:38 pm

The riots were in ‘68, not '68. The former lobby area is now for lease. The CVS drug store that occupies part of the structure will soon move across the street next to Safeway.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Naylor Theatre on Dec 9, 2009 at 10:34 pm

The riots were miles from the Alabama-Naylor neighborhood. Barry was years away from being mayor in 1970 and the Hillcrest area has continued to be middle class and a sought after place to live. It’s the one area of E of the river that has retained some white population.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Detroit Theatre on Dec 9, 2009 at 5:35 pm

It was a small theatre, but I think 425 was too small. We occasionally came west as a novelty to see first run shows here in the 60s. I remember seeing “Thunderball” there.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Great Lakes Stadium 16 on Dec 9, 2009 at 5:32 pm

Associated didn’t operate the Shore.

buckguy
buckguy commented about University Theatre on Dec 9, 2009 at 5:24 pm

During the Scrumpy Dump era the theatre was owned by an African-American enterpreneur who owned a lot of property in the area and traded on paranois regarding the likelihood that Cleveland Clinic wanted the locals out. By that time, the area had declined, esp. after the 1966 Hough riots. The W.O. Walker Center, which stood vacant for years, is shared by Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals, an odd arrnagement between two long-time rivals. I forget which one owns the building.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Richmond Town Square Stadium 20 on Dec 9, 2009 at 5:14 pm

This opened with the mall in 1966 as Loew’s East. It was attached to a mall entrance shared with a Kroger super market. I believe it either had one or three screens when it opened.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Loew's Stillman Theatre on Dec 9, 2009 at 5:02 pm

@Archie: The department stores did not close “year by year”. Taylor’s closed in ‘61. Bailey relocated to the old Bing Furniture store and lasted until '66. Sterling’s lasted until '68. Halle’s 'til the end of '81, and so forth.

buckguy
buckguy commented about Hippodrome Theatre on Dec 9, 2009 at 4:59 pm

I last visited the Hipp as a teenager in ‘70 or '71. Rumors of its closing circulated for years, so it was almost a surprise when it finally happened. The place was a dump in its closing days, but the huge screen and the size of the (closed) balconies were evident. the seats functional but very old and the clientele had become fairly marginal. In its last years, it played mostly drive-in type fare and blaxploitation films.

As for the location, the Euclid/Prospect split was the most profound. The Playhouse Square theatres were surrounded by upscale retail like Halle’s, Bonwit-Teller, Sterling Linder, Peck & Peck, Milgrim, etc. there were a few theatres on E 9th, which was a marginal area until the Erieview urban renewal program of the 1960s. There was at least one near Public Square, which i believe became retail. I think it was an S&H Green Stamp redemption center for most of the 60s. Near the Hipp were the upscale Taylor department store (converted to offices in 1962) and a lot of midrange retail like Bond’s, Richman Bros, Burrows (blooks & stationary), along with the Euclid, Colonial, & Taylor arcades which had service oriented businesses. prospect was always low end retail including pawn shops, credit jewelers, furniture stores (Bing’s, later used as the downscale Bailey’s department store), Kay’s huge used book store (the stock was sold to Powell’s in Portland), army-navy stores, the famous Record Rendevous, etc. The Hipp marquee on Prospect was gone by the late 60s, although I believe there was an entrance to the office building.

The Carter was probably adjacent to the Carter Hotel (later Pick-Carter) which was converted to senior housing in the 1970s, and I think is still known as Carter Manor. The Carter was a respectable hotel but not in the same class as the Sheraton-Cleveland on Public Square or the Statler Hilton, further down Euclid near halle’s.