Comments from Okie

Showing 1 - 25 of 187 comments

Okie
Okie commented about Sunset Cinemas on Oct 1, 2006 at 12:49 pm

The Movies 1 & 2 were renamed Sunset Cinemas, and are located at 1221 W. Crawford, Salina, KS.

Okie
Okie commented about Reminder: Keep comments on topic! on Sep 3, 2006 at 12:38 pm

One thing is certain, some one at CT needs to browse comments posted (especially on Oklahoma pages) and remove outdated web address links, useless comments, and delete information that is not accurate. This would give the site a better look altogether!

Okie
Okie commented about Movies 1 & 2 on Sep 3, 2006 at 9:48 am

Opened in 1971 The Movies I & II Cinemas were installed inside existing retail space along a strip shopping center.
During this period all theatres in The Movies Franchise Cinemas operation were decorated to resemble old time nickelodeons with bright red shag carpeting, scarlet flocked/gold foiled wallpaper, crimson carnival glass light fixtures, gilt framed vintage movie posters, and antique magic latern displays.
Original manager of this twin cinema was a young gentleman named Williams. Mr. Williams gained management experience at Frontier City Amusement Park where his father had owned several shops and rides.
Jerry Lewis Cinemas and The Movies Franchise Cinemas began operation around the same time, and were amoung the first franchised cinema circuits. CEO of The Movies Franchise was J. Cooper Burke who was the very first “Marlboro Man”, of cigarette advertising fame.

Okie
Okie commented about Mars Theater on Sep 3, 2006 at 8:48 am

I wonder if the Mars Theatre was decorated in a planetary theme?

Okie
Okie commented about Lyric Theatre on Sep 3, 2006 at 8:42 am

The Lyric Theatre can be seen ‘photo right’, not left. A black automobile coupe with a white convertible canvas top is parked in front of the Lyric entrance.
Caption says the Gayety Theatre is in view, but it really isn’t. Gayety would have been just beyond that “ALVA” wall sign on distant left.

Okie
Okie commented about Main Street Theater on Sep 2, 2006 at 7:44 pm

This picture postcard, published during the 1950’s, clearly illustrates that the old Main Street Cinema had already closed, converted to retail use. It was situated between Crown Drugs and JC Penney’s. Tulsa Theatre was located across from the Main Street Cinema,
http://tulsalawyer.com/page54.html

Okie
Okie commented about Valliant Nickelodeon on Sep 2, 2006 at 2:42 pm

Didn’t Valiant have another vintage movie house on Dalton Street called the Royal?

Okie
Okie commented about Boomer Theater on Aug 27, 2006 at 11:32 am

Upstairs area of the Boomer had a good amount of non-public space. There was a reception office, managers office, locker room, generator room, projection booth, and a 15 seat, glassed in viewing room for employees.

Okie
Okie commented about Pollard Theatre on Aug 26, 2006 at 11:47 pm

Dear LL:
This Guthrie movie premiere story is true. Warner Bros brought their big stars to Guthrie to promote this picture. A horse drawn stage-coach picked celebrities up at the depot. It may have been “OKLAHOMA KID”, but I’m not sure.

Contact Dr. Blackburn at the Oklahoma State Historical Society for further details, and photos of the event. Also, Guthrie Public Library Archives has material on this subject.

By the way, Republic Pictures built an entire western town set (portions still stand today) in Canadian, OK, in which scenes for “ROCK ISLAND TRAIL” were filmed. This John Wayne oater held a gala, star studded premiere at the Okla Theatre, McAlester, OK.

Tulsa’s Ritz Theatre celebrated a world premiere of “TULSA”, starring Susan Hayward, and Robert Preston.

Okie
Okie commented about Hippodrome Theatre and Ballroom on Aug 24, 2006 at 11:15 pm

When Hippodrome was built the population of Okmulgee was over 20,000, over these many years population continually has dropped to a 2006 count of 13,441. Still, the Hippodrome was a rather large theatre for such a small town, and with 2200 seats some like to claim that this was the largest theater ever built in Oklahoma, but this is just not true.
Oklahoma City had Shriners Theatre (AKA-Warner’s Auditorium, Home) with 2300 seats, and Municipal Auditorium with 6100 seats.
Tulsa had Delman Theatre with 2200 seats, and Brady Theatre with 4500 seats.

Okie
Okie commented about Love Theatre on Aug 24, 2006 at 10:55 pm

Ken; The phone rang while I was entering above comments. What I ment to say was- I wonder if Lola Williams also owned the Tulsa Dreamland Theatre.

Okie
Okie commented about Love Theatre on Aug 20, 2006 at 4:28 pm

Lola Williams owned the Dreamland Theatre in Tulsa.
The Williams Family also operated other Tulsa movie houses. Along with Okmulgee’s Dreamland, it seems to have been a black theatre chain.

Okie
Okie commented about Inca Theatre on Aug 20, 2006 at 3:21 pm

Mr. Miller; I’m sure you ment to write that the Hippodrome fire occurred in early morning hours of January 1, 1934, caused when New Years Eve ballroom decorations mysteriously ignited.

Okie
Okie commented about Love Theatre on Aug 20, 2006 at 3:16 pm

You’re most welcome, Ken.
This theatre was on the North once thriving black business district.
Actually, it looks as if the theatre name may have been visa-versa, originally called Drew Theatre, then Rex. After it closed as a movie house the marquee letterboard was covered over with a glass sign that read Rex Billiard Parlor.
Do you have an address for the Dreamland?

Okie
Okie commented about Love Theatre on Aug 20, 2006 at 12:22 pm

According to my notes most everything Mr. Miller has reported on Okmulgee theatre history is correct, -except- for the Rex Theatre address. The Rex sat on East FIFTH Street, near North Severs Avenue, not E. Seventh St.

Okie
Okie commented about Boomer Theater on Aug 13, 2006 at 12:36 pm

The Boomer Theater also had a bright red, neon marquee that matched the tall upright sign.

Okie
Okie commented about May Theatre on Aug 12, 2006 at 8:03 pm

Several establiments around this stretch of the May Avenue business district were decorated in tropical themes; amoung them were the Palm Room Lounge, Zanzi Bar, Tropicana Cafeteria, Veezee Drug Store, and May Theatre.
While the May Theatre exterior was executed in 1940’s streamline styling, the original interior motif was tropic.
I remember attending this theatre as a small child and remember noticing that woven into lobby carpeting were green & yellow banana leaves with an orange background, spotlighted potted palms brightened corner areas, and a stuffed blue parrot perched inside a hoop above the concession stand.
Low lighting levels enhanced exotic jungle silhouettes that were painted onto standee walls, with banana leaf carpeting, and a spattering of bamboo accents that made this area mysterious, and a bit spooky too.
Auditorium walls were arranged in zigzag order, decorated with colossal stencilled banana leaves accented by indirect lighting. Color wheel lighting danced across lush stage drapes, and a green neon advertising clock reminded kids what time mom would pick them up.
This tropic theme came together nicely to create a pleasant environment in which to view a movie.

Okie
Okie commented about Ritz Theatre on Aug 5, 2006 at 12:14 pm

Antique postcard entitled “Heart of City by Night” illustrates Majestic and Ritz roof signs. Most all buildings in site were demolished in the 1970s,
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Majestic Theater on Aug 5, 2006 at 12:09 pm

“Heart of the City by Night” postcard illustrates roof signs atop Tulsa’s Majestic and Ritz theatres,
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Cooper Cinerama Theatre on Aug 5, 2006 at 11:48 am

Sort through these vintage postcards to find color images of OKC’s 1916 Liberty Theatre, 1928 Market Theatre, and 1903 Overholser Opera House.
Note the Ramsey Building 1931 postcard. This tower was designed by architect W.W. Ahlschlager, who also created NYC’s famed Roxy Theatre.
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Warner Theatre on Aug 5, 2006 at 11:37 am

Amoungst these antique postcards can be found images of OKC’s Liberty (AKA-Harbor, Cooper), Market Theatre, and original 1903 facade of the Overholser Opera House (AKA-Orpheum, Warner) before John Eberson’s 1919 renovation.
Of interest to theatre buffs; note the Ramsey Building postcard. This skyscraper was designed by architect W.W. Ahlschlager who also created NYC’s famed Roxy Theatre.
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Cherokee Theater on Aug 5, 2006 at 11:00 am

Center left of this vintage postcard shows an Enid movie house, name is very difficult to make out. Does it read Cherokee?
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Lawton Theater on Aug 5, 2006 at 10:45 am

Close inspection of this vintage postcard air view of business district, downtown Lawton, will reveal several theatre structures, including the Lawton Theatre,
View link
and this color postcard of Fort Sill Theatre, still showing free movies to those in uniform who serve our country,
View link

Okie
Okie commented about Ritz Theatre on Aug 3, 2006 at 6:00 pm

Read a well written history of Shawnee’s little Ritz Theatre on this link,
http://downtownshawnee.org/ritz_hist.htm

Okie
Okie commented about Herron's Crown Opry Theater on Aug 3, 2006 at 10:10 am

This link has small exterior/interior color photographs of Collinsville’s Crown Theatre,
http://www.cvilleok.com/colattr.html