DMac Theatre

62 E. Fourth Street,
New York, NY 10003

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DMac Theatre

Viewing: Photo | Street View

Located in New York’s East Village, the building was constructed as a social hall in 1889. In the 1930’s it was converted into a theatre and was used for a time as a Yiddish theatre, and later as a TV studio known as the Astoria Theatre. It became an off-Broadway theatre known as Theatre 62, and in 1967 it became Channel One Video Theater.

Later known as the Fortune Theatre, in 1969 it was rented to Andy Warhol and became a gay male porn movie theatre name Andy Warhol’s Theatre:Boys to Adore Galore. The films were silent hard core porn, which were accompanied by taped music. Joe Dallasandro was a projectionist here for several weeks.

In the early-1970’s it hosted live productions starring Andy Warhol ‘Superstars’. Francis Ford Coppola hired the Renaissance style auditorium of the theatre to shoot the Italian opera scenes in “Godfather II”

By 2013 it was operating as the DMac Theatre, a performing arts centre which also screens some movies.

Contributed by Ken Roe, RobertR

Recent comments (view all 4 comments)

Al Alvarez
Al Alvarez on May 1, 2006 at 2:14 am

As far as I can tell this location only ran one film, MALE MAGAZINE, in the late sixties for a few weeks and even that appears to have been a gimmick at turning gay porn loops into performance art. The Fortune should probably be delisted here.

verranth1 on February 25, 2008 at 8:01 am

As far as I know, this was a theatre owned by none other than Andy Warhol in the late sixties. It did indeed show adult fare and had the distinction of having Joe Dallesandro (Warhol Superstar) be a projectionist there as well have a revolving door of male clients who visited Dallesandro during the show.

kencmcintyre on July 17, 2008 at 3:42 pm

Here is a photo taken from Google maps. The white sign says “Theater Rentals”.

poman on June 9, 2009 at 3:16 pm

This was an off-Broadway house called Theatre 62 for a while, but in July of 1967 it made the national news as the Channel One video theater as a showcase for the satirical “Channel One Underground Television” productions that eventually became the 1974 motion picture THE GROOVE TUBE (named after Channel One’s fourth production, a compilation of the best skits from their three previous shows “First Production,” “Second Production,” and “Fugue Tube”). The theater had three 21-inch b&w television sets hanging from the ceiling that showed the Channel One programs on closed-circuit videocassette (usually 90 minutes in length). “The Groove Tube” show became so popular in 1969 that a second theater was added (Theater East at 211 East 60th Street) and soon the Channel One founders – Ken Shapiro & Lane Sarasohn – were franchising the tapes to college campuses and performance spaces across the country. I think Channel One moved out in 1970.

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